100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 30, 1947 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-07-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WED)NESDlAY, JULY 30,- 1947

SUCCESS IN SIGHT:
Uniform Traffic Laws Drive
By Truman Gaining Ground

TREND TO LEFT:
England's Economic Crisis
Leading to More Socialization

t

NEW YORK, July 29-(')--The
drive led by President Truman for

greater uniformity of State traf-
fic laws has been gaining ground,
but the opportunities are still
great for a motorist to end up in
a morgue or jail by observing the
Music Group
To6'Perform
Chorus To Present
Summer Concert
The University Summer Chorus,
under the direction of Miss Mary
Muldowney, will present its an-
nual summer concert at 4:15 Sun-
day in Hill Auditorium.
The program will include Mo-
zart's "Lacrymosa" from the
"Requiem" and "Hear My Suppli-
cation" by Arkhangelsky.
Elizabeth Green, violinist, and
Celia Chao and Elizabeth Powell,
pianists, will accompany the
chorus in the familiar Brahms
"Love Songs."
Howard Hatton, baritone, will
sing Samuel Barber's "Dover
Beach."
The program will also include
Vaughn Williams' "Serenade to
Music," sung by the vocal quar-
tet.
Miss Muldowney, chorus direct-
or, is in charge of Choral Music
at State Teachers' College in In-
diana, Pa.
The chorus program will be open'
to the public.

laws of his own state on the high-
ways of another.
This year at least 27 state leg-
islatures have made changes in
their traffic and highway safety
laws, an associated press survey
shows. The president's Highway
Safety Conference reported that
21 have adopted one or more of,
the provisions of the uniform ve-
hicle code which the experts have
been recommending since 1925.
Special Measures
A host of special measures also
was adopted in the hope of re-
ducing the effectiveness of Amer-
ica's favorite weapon for killing
Americans.
North Carolina doubled its
highway patrol, Tennessee added
40 men. Indiana demanded that
all physicians treating epileptics
and others suffering from nervous
disorders to report their names
to the State Board of Health,
which in turn gives them to the
Motor Vehicle Bureau.
Stiffen Drunk Penalty
Nebraska stiffend its maximum
drunk driving penalty to three
years -in jail. Iowa passed a law
requiring courts to record all non-
parking traffic violators on the
back of the driver's license. Tex-
as, among other things, now de-
mands that drivers striking unat-
tended vehicles leave written no-
tice of their name and address.
In 41 states, you must dim your
headlights when approaching an-
other car. In seven states, there
is no law preventing you from
blinding the other fellow into the
grave.
Griffin To Visit
Indian Excavation
Prof. James B. Griffin, direc-
tor of the Museum of Anthropol-
ogy, will go to Ottawa, Ill., today
to visit the site of excavation of
the Kaskasias Indians.
The excavation is of a large In-
dian village near the Illinois River
which was visited by Father Mar-
quette and Father Joliet nearly
300 years ago.
Prof. Griffin will spend four
days with directors of the work,
which is sponsored by the Univer-
sity of Chicago.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

WILLIAM KINZER-Student in
the speech department will play
one of the leading roles in the
Michigan Repertory Player's
p r o d u c t i o n of "Temper the
Wind" to be presented at 8 p.m.
tomorrow through Saturday at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
CamPus
Spanish Lecure ...
La Sociedad Hispanica will pre-
sent an illustrated lecture by Emi-
liano Gallo Ruiz, instructor in the
romance languages department, on
the topic "La Estetica de la Pin-
tura Mejicana Moderna" at 8 p.m.
today in the East Conference
Room of the Rackham Building.
* * *
Musical Program,...
Frank W. Baird, cornetist,
and Grace Harriman Sexton,
pianist, will present a recital at
8:30 p.m. Friday at the Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
The program will include a
Haydn concerto, and selections
by Barthe, Hindemith, Chap-
ius, Ibert, Emmanuel and Barat.
Noah A. Knepper, oboist, and
Mary Alice Duncan, pianist, will
be accompanists.
* * *
French Club Talk .. .
Prof. Ernest F. Haden, of the
University of Texas, will speak to
the French Club on "Les Acadiens
dans l'est du Canada" at 8 p.m.
tomorrow in the Terrace Room of
the Union.
Song Recital .-
Warren Allen, music school stu-
dent, will present a song recital at
8:30 p.m. Saturday at Rackham
Assembly Hall.
He will be accompanied by Wil-
liam Wilkins, pianist.

r
..
..
A
YI
11
4l
9i
11
Y'
4.
r.
i
61
P'
4'
91
41
4'
Y.
'I,
31

1V
SUMMER
And time for a more exciting,
~flattering hair-do. See the 0
new feather fluffs, up-sweeps
today!
7A NN'S ~
BEAUTY ARBOR
1315 S. University Ph. 7156
Qt Yom mo

By J. M. ROBERTS, JR.
AP Foreign Affairs Analyst
Seven years ago Great Britain
was saved by a few men in skill-
fully made machines who stopped
Hitler's Luftwaffe. Today she
faces a new crisis which somehow
seems to transcend the strength
of men and of the machines on
which she depends in peacetime.
The news from London serves
to re-emphasize the economic load
which the United States must
bear if the Western worldis' to be
held together either economically
or politically.
Britain is planning to reduce her
armed forces around the world,
both to save money and to divert
manpower into industry. She is
talking about spendinguher gold
reserve to tide her over until Eur-
ope can begin its comeback under
the Marshall plan.
For Everyday Living
For a country to spend its gold
reserve on everyday living is the
same as for a family to spend its
savings. Even though the gold
may not be linked to currency, its
presence is an indication of solv-
ency and its dissipation a threat
to monetary systems and public
credit.
The U.S. is extending aid to
Britain, just as we did seven years
ago, because she is a necessity in
our scheme of things. Since we
are committed to a policy of main-
taining the Western s y s t e m
against the inroads of totalitarian
Communism, we have to pick up
military burdens wherever Britain
lays them down, as we did in
Greece and as she she now wants
us to do in Germany and perhaps
elsewhere.
Also Political Issue
The economic situation in Eng-
land is also, of course, a political
Japanese ...
(Continued from Page 1)
"The main task in Korea . .. is
the establishment of a govern-
ment for all of Korea," Borton
said. "U.S. members of the Joint
Commission have been instructed
to stand firm, in order that ob-
jectives of this government shall
be achieved.
"These objectives are the es-
tablishment of a self-governing,
sovereign Korea as soon as pos-
sible, the assurance that the na-
tional government so established
is fully representative of the will
of the Korean people and assis-
tance to the Koreans in establish-
ing a sound economy and ade-
quate educational system."
Congress .. .
(Continued from Page1>)
own "delightful district," he de-
clared that the laboring men get
all of their information out of
CIO News while the NAM repre-
sentatives get their point of view
from the NAM publications. Mich-
ener explained that he prefers to
read the bills.
Michener is opposed to the Mur-
ray-Wagner-Dingell health bill as
it is now written. While advocat-
ing more privileges and hospitals
for the people, he has often told
his constituents that he is opposed
to "socialized medicine."
Wants Communists Registered
He is also opposed to having
Communists in the government,
contending that "they ought not
to be in the government if they
want to change it." While not
desiring to outlaw the Communist
Party, he favored a bill by Rep-
resentative Mundt (R.-S.D.) of the
Un-American Activities Commit-
tee which, if it had passed would
have required Communists to reg-
ister as foreign agents "so that

we would know who they are."
Something of a rebel in the mat-
ter of budget cutting, the con-
gressman from Ann Arbor served
notice on his party that he would
not be bound by the six billiion
reduction figure set by the House
leaders. He favored c u t t i n g
wherever possible but insisted up-
on distinguishing between essen-
tial and non-essential activities.
Reduced to a single tricky
phrase, M i c h e n e r's legislative
philosophy is: "We may not think
alike, but we can agree alike to
think."

issue. But the fate of any given
British government is of less mom-
ent in the United States, for the
present, than English economic
stability.
Lewis' _Novel
'Arrowsmith'
To BeShown
Ronald. Colman in "Arow-
smith," film version of the Sin-
clair Lewis novel, will be present-
ed by the Inter-Cooperative Coun-
cil at 8 p.m. Sunday and Monday
at Hill Auditorium.
The story is that of a young
doctor who after graduation from
college is unable to settle down
to the quiet life of a country doc-,
tor. In an effort to develop a
cure for bubonic plague, he goes
to the West Indies, where his wife
is killed by the plague.
Collaborated With Paul de Kruif
Lewis' novel, written in cola-
boration with Paul de Kruif, a
University graduate, contains a
fictionized version of life at the
University and in Ann Arbor, as
well as characterizations based on
members of the faculty.
However, when "Arrowsmith"
appeared as a novel several years
ago, it raised a storm of protest
from medical men all over the
world. Lewis' attacks on medical
pedantry were criticized as over-
bitter and untrue.
The same criticism has been
leveled against his latest best-
selling book, "Kingsblood Royal."
Best Known Works
"Arrowsmith," however, is one
of Lewis' best-known works, called
by many his masterpiece.
Featured in the film version is
Ronald Colman as Martin Arrow-
smith and Helen Hayes as the
nurse that later becomes his wife.
Produced by Samuel Goldwyn,
the picture is directed by John
Ford.
Tickets for the film will go on
sale today at Union and League
desks.
2 uPrices
25c until 5 p.m.
30c after 5 p.m.
-- Today & Tomorrow
"STRANGE WOMEN"
with
HEDY LAMARR
and GEORGE SANDERS
- Also-
"GAME OF DEATH"
with JOHN LODER

Program To
Feature Early
Secular Music
A program of secular music of
the Middle Ages, Renaissance and
Baroque periods will be presented
at 8:30 p.m. tomori'ow at Rackham
Assembly Hall.
Prepared under the direction of
Prof. Louise E. Cuyler, of the mu-
sic school, the concert is part of
a program to revive performances
of little known music of the period
before the 18th century.
Prof. Cuyler has supervised the
transcription and arrangement of
the music made by Mary Ellis,
Elizabeth Gould, Edwyn Hames,
Andrew Minor and Robert Warn-
er, music school students.
The program will include five
groups of secular music featuring
performances of the Madrigal
Singers, under the direction of
Prof. Wayne Dunlap of the music
school; a Brass Ensemble, con-
ducted by Paul Bryan, and a
Chamber Orchestra, directed by
Edwyn Hames.
Soloists in the concert will be
Robert Waltz, Howard Hatton,
Nathan Jones, Arlene Burt, Rob-
ert Warner, Willima Poland and
William Weichlein.
The program, including works
by Joaquin Des Prez, Monteverdi,
Banchieri, Pezel, King Henry VIII,
Dufay and Purcell, will be open
to the public.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
ALWAYS COOL!

LANSING, July 29-(P)--TheL
virtual end of war-time controls
on liquor was heralded today by
the liquor control commission an-
nouncement that individual cus-
tomers after Saturday can buy all
the scotch they want.
A commission spokesman said,

U

ART CINEMA LEAGUE Presents

x

increasing supplies permitted the
removal of the rule restricting in-
dividuals to purchases of one bot-
tle of scotch at a time.
Rationing of liquor, inaugurated
in August, 1943, has been gradu-
ally relaxed as supplies reached
normal.

I

."

HILL AUDITORIUM
Box Office Open 3 P.M. Thursday
Admission 45c (tax inci.)
Tickets, Phone 4121 Ext. 479

I

i

TE

r
i
I
AVofl

1

Commission Ends Liquor Controls

W' - PLUS
DONALD CRiSP NEWS
DON DeFORE
Cartoon
--STARTS THURSDAY--

THE FARM CUPBOARD
Specializing in FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS
Open 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. including Sundays.
5400 Plymouth Road (on the way to Detroit) Phone 9387
COTTAGE INN
Specializing in Home Cooked Food.. . Steaks and Chops
Open Weekdays 11:00 A.M. - 1:30 P.M., 5:00 -8:00 P.ML
Sundays 11:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M., 5:00 - 9:00 P.M.
Closed Saturdays 512 East William
GRANADA CAFE
. GOOD FOOD IS GOOD HEALTH
Open for your convenience:
Daily 7:30 A.M.-11:30 P.M. Tues., 7:30 A.M.-8:00 P.M.
Sundays 11:30 A.M.-11:30 P.M.
313 South State

4

SELL YOUR

CA R..
Now is the Time!
Top Prices Paid ! Damonds
For Top Dollar, see 0 and
KNOLL & ERWIN, inc. Wedding a
HUDSON DEALERS
907 North Main Rings
Phone 7040 or 406717 North University Ave.
Io

I1 ME F OO3VJU FOD
Lunches 11:30-1:30 - Only 65c
Dinners (family style) 5:00-8:00 P.M. - $1.45.$1.65
Evening Meals for $1.00 after July 1
418 E. Washington (one-half block off State) Phone 9717

Also! CARTOON - NEWSI

w

I'

1'

I-

1

FOR FUTURE REFERENCE

A few copies of the

- - -
OPENING
TOMORROW NIGHT -- 8 P.M
THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH presents
THE MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
in
~:"EMPER T'HE WINDV
By Edward Mabley and Leonard Mins
A STIRRING PLAY OF POST-WAR GERMANY fi
Acclaimed on Broadway this season.
Tomorrow through Sit. 8 P.M.
Saturday Matinee - 2:30 P.M.
Tickets $1.20-90c-60c (tax incl.)
Box Office Phone 6300
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

L

MICHIGAN LAST TIME TODA

r

Y

I.

IL

S

7T

PENT

I

BE

F-I i

fly

will be sold today for

h -

al

5O0C

I

BOY MEETS GIRL NIGHT
EVERY WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY
AT THE BEAUTIFUL
BILuIE LANTIERN BAILLROOM
SPECIAL ADMISSION TO LADlES WITH COURTESY PASS!
II A. .1 I * I I- I I III U IiLL. LIE WJL. ._ _

I

0 1

I

-

t __ i 1__ _.__ 1

II

1111

Hill

I

I

BILLY Ut WULUt It I

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan