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July 21, 1946 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-21

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1U

Crisler Heads for Chicago-
Assembly of Conferences

Has No Definite Proposals To Present;
Amteurism To Be Key-Note of Meeting

Coach H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler leaves
Ann Arbor this morning to attend the
general meeting of American collegi-
ate conferences being held in Chi-
cago tomorrow and Tuesday.
Crisler is official representative of
the Western Conference, along with
Prof. George Richert of Illinois.
Asked if he had any particular sub-
ject which he wished to touch upon
at the gathering, Crisler said yester-
day, "I am going to the meeting with
an open mind. I have not seen any
specific agenda concerning the topics
which are going to be discussed, but
the key-note of the conference will
be the question of amateurism as
against semi-professionalism in col-
lege athletics."'
Sponsored by Tug Wilson
The meeting of the conferences is
being sponsored by Big Ten Commis-
sioner Tug Wilson, and precedes a
Wednesday assembly of the National
Collegiate Athletic Association Coun-
cil.
It is hoped that the meeting will
clarify the picture of college athletics
as it looks today, bringing to light
many of' the problems which face
scholastic sports. Wilson, also sec-

retary of the NCAA, feels that the
Chicago discussion will indicate what
action should be taken at the coming
annual meeting of the NCAA in New
York.
Commenting on the possible re-
sults of the conference, Coach Cris-
ler declared, "I hope that many
things will come out of this meeting
which will act strongly to the definite
advantage of inter-collegiate sports.
We want very much to strengthen
the spirit of amateurism in athletics."
No Actual Alarm
In his statement announcing the
meeting Wilson expressed the opinion
that there was no actual feeling of
great alarm over the condition of
collegiate sports, but continued that
the conferences should get together
and coordinate their actions in pro-
moting scholastic athletics before
some permanent damage is suffered.
Representatives from the Border,
Central Collegiate, Middle Atlantic,
Mid-West, Big Six, Missouri Valley,
Mountain States, Pacific Coast,
Southeastern, Southern, Southwest,
Eastern, Western, Obio, Ivy, and
Rocky Mountain Conferences will at-
tend the sessions.

TEN OVER MACK:
Detroit Edges Athletics, 4-3
As Bridges HelpsHutchinson
4'>

Rams Acquire
Tom Harmon
For Two Years
Adam Walsh Berates
L. A. Dons for Snub
By The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES, July 20-The Los
Angeles Rams of the National Foot-
ball League today signed Tom Har-
mon, fresh from a snubbing by the
Los Angeles Dons of the rival All-
America conference, to a two-year
playing contract.
Ram'cGeneral Manager Chile
Walsh said Harmon was obtainable
Canja Cops Diving Title
DETROIT, July 20-(IP)-Alex
Canja, University of Michigan
diving ace, won the three-meter
springboard diving title today in
the Michigan AAU swimming
meet held at Rouge Pool.
Michigan State entries splashed
their way to team and individual
honors racking up a total of 67
points to 13 for Kronk, in the run-
ner-up spot. The Detroit Athletic
Club totalled 12 points, U of Mich-
igan, 6; Wayne, 5; and Grosse
Pointe, 2.
from the Chicago Bears in exchange
for halfback Dante Magnani and
tackle Fred Davis. Terms were not
disclosed, but Walsh declared Har-
mon will be paid a salary "in keep-
ing with his ability and reputation."
Signing of the former Michigan
All-America (1938 and 1939) added
more torrid feelings between the
Rams and the Dons. Only yesterday
Slip Madigan, Dons' general mana-
ger, said his club had stopped nego-
tiations with Harmon, who, he add-
ed, was "away from football too long
and ... too much interested in ra-
dio work."
Walsh, in his announcement to-
day, upbraided Madigan for "q
most upsportsmanlike gesture in
suggesting Harmon was an in-
ferior player."
"Harmon is 26, the same age as
Bob Waterfield, our quarter-back
who last year was the most valuable
player in the National League,"
Walsh fumed in his statement. "The
entire National League considers it
a great honor to accept Harmon as
a player, returning war veteran and
highly respected individual.
Rams' Coach Adam Walsh said
Harmon will play left half and wear
his famous No. 98 jersey.
The Michigan star, who now re-
sides in nearby San Francisco Valley
with actress wife, Elyse Knox, and
their daughter, will return to the
Rams' training camp at Compton
July 29.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

FORTHREOD.
By JACK MARTIN, Daily Sports Editor
COACH RAY FISHER during his extensive tenure at the helm of Wol-
verine diamond squads has probably produced more championship ag-
gregations than any other two colleges in the country can boast. In addi-
tion to fashioning top-notch teams, however, Ray has launched many an
individual star into a successful career in the highest brackets of baseball.
The latest installment to this ever-continuing story is now taking
place in the Eastern League, where a pair of Michigan's outstanding
sluggers are being initiated into O.B. at Williamsport, Pa. Bruce Blan-
chard has been there since early season, while Elmer Swanson, after a
preliminary report at Buffalo, has just joined him.
The name of Elmer Swanson is extremely fresh in the memories of
Wolverine baseball fans, having clouted homers and triples all over the
Western Conference only last Spring. Blanchard, on the other hand, has
been absent from the Michigan sports scene since 1944 due to an iron-clad
contract with the Marines. Discharged last Spring, he was immediately
grabbed by the Detroit Tigers and farmed to their Eastern club.
First reports on his progress are now trickling back, and it seems
the Ex-Marine has the situation well in hand. He has been boosted by
his Williamsport bosses into the lead-off spot in the batting line-up, and
is currently blasting the ball at an average pace of well over .300. A red-
letter day came on July 7 when he connected for his first professional
home run against Scranton, a rather solid blow that sailed 370 feet. ,
Blanchard also provided his owners with a few eye-openers when the
Tigers invaded Williamsport for an exhibition game and he bored through
Detroit pitching for a two-for-four performance at the plate.
THERE IS A TALE behind Bruce Blanchard's rise to fame that has never
been told. It begins at Cooley High School in Detroit where Bruce re-
ceived his prep school education-and it begins with a touch of irony. For
Blanchard, later to become one of Michigan's infield greats and destined
for duty in big time circles, did not make his high school nine!
In his second year at Cooley High in 1939, Bruce, who had breathed
baseball since he was a tyke, decided to try for the school squad. Third
base was his choice, but it so happened that, at that particular time, the
hot corner was in the hands of the team captain; so the young rookie
was relegated into the distant background.
Disappointed but undaunted, Bruce turned from his scholastic scene
and plunged into the crowded and confused Detroit. sand-lot picture. In
a short few weeks he became the most respected newcomer in the league and
a bane to the existence of all enemy pitchers. In his first season, playing for
a Class D outfit, he slammed the ball all over the Motor City for a terrific.
season batting average of .520.
It was only the beginning. He repeated his torrid performance in
1941, ending the year slugging at a .465 pace. Bruce then went to Kiski
Prep School in Pennsylvania, where, with tongue.in cheek, remembering
his high'school experience, he ventured out for the school team, He not
only made the squad-he shattered all the local hitting records into
atoms, establishing an all-time batting tecord with a season average of
.630. This was the third baseman for whom Cooley High had no room!
RETURNING to the sand-lot wars, Bruce helped the Altes nine capture the
crown, and again struck terror into the souls of opposing pitchers with
a .420 average. In 1942 he set a record when he walked off with his third
Sandlotter-of-the-month award in July. The first two came in 1940-41. No
other player in the circuit's history has carried home three of the' coveted
prizes. At the time he won the third trophy, Bruce was hitting at a fantastic
.778 average.
It is one of the unexplained wonders of the baseball game that during
this period when Bruce Blanchard was literally setting fire to the base-
paths of Detroit's, sand-lot diamonds. he was never. seen on his hirh
school nine's roster. One can only raise an eye-browshrUg a-shoulder, .
and murmur, "That's baseball!"
Pick Flam for Western Net Crown

Bob Bussler Opposes
Carbrey in Top Match
First rounds of match play in the
intramural golf tournament begin
next week, with the 32 contestants
divided into four flights.
Howard Leibee, intramural direc-
tor, declared that all the first round
matches must be completed by
Wednesday, July 24. Second rounds
play is scheduled to finish the fol-
lowing Wednesday, and the finals
are to be finished by August 7.
Eight men are listed for each flight,
with the top Championship Flight
composed of men scoring below 78
in the medal play the past week.
Robert Bussler, winner of the me-
dal play, is scheduled to meet Lee
Carbrey in the Championship first
rounds, while the other top matches
are: William Powers vs. Bob Cam-
pan; Doug Beath vs. Henry Pryzbek;
and John Olsen vs. Dick Savage.
The Wolverine Flight will compete
in the opening rounds as follows:
John Page vs. Fred Campan; Harold
Swim Meet Planned
The Intramural department an-
nounced yesterday that an all-cam
pus swimming meet will be held at
the Sports Building Pool on August
14.
All entrants -must be entered at
the intramural offices by August 12,

First Rounds of Match Play
In IMGolf Tournament Begil

RESIDENCE HALL
Runsey . . .........
Prescott ..............
Hinsdale ...........
Fletcher ............
Tyler ............... .
Vaughn............
Wenley........ ....
Green ..... . .......

3
3
2
2
1
1
0
0

FRATERNITY
Chi Phi.......... .
Sigma Alpha Epsilon,.
Sigma Chi............
Zeta Beta Tau......
Theta Xi . ..........
Delta Tau- Delta .......
Phi Sigma Delta.....
INDEPENDENTS
Vets Housing .........
Gamma Delta.........
Lawyers............
Pick-Ups ....... . ... .

2i
21
1
1
1
1
0
2
1
1
0

0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
0
0
0
1
2
2
3
0
1
I
2

00

Price vs. William Peet; D. M. Cla
han vs. J. J. Benavel; Gil Westa
Dick Dragen.
In the Maize Flight the mat
are: Jim Franger vs. McKee;
Stottsterner vs. R. L. Thompson
Germain vs. Ray Burton; Fri
Morgan vs. Winfield.
The Blue Flight is scheduled
follows: Ed Vogt vs. Robie; F
McMahon vs. John Gent; Dick St
ley vs. Cecil Sink; John Gwin vs.
Rush.
Sfa Sa*
Softball Standngg

two days before the meet . . .
The competition will include
following events:
25 yard freestyle, backstroke,
breast-stroke.
50 yard freestroke, backstroke,
breast-stroke.
15 yard freestyle, backstroke,
breast-stroke.

the
and
and
and

Mangrum Leads Golfers
CHICAGO, July 20- (R) - MU
tachioed Lloyd Mangrum, ignoring
war wound twitch in his left shoul
er, today spanked a course recor
matching 67 to bound three strol
in front of the $10,000 Victory N9
tionlal Open Golf field at the 3
hole mark with a six-under-par 1
The U.S. Open champion slamm
five birdies as he added a 33-34
his opening 69 yesterday.

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA, July 20-Detroit
won its tenth straight game over the
Philadelphia Athletics 4 to 3, today
as Fred Hutchinson and his relief
hurler, .Tommy Bridges, halted the
lMackmen in the pinches.
It was see-saw contest with Bridges
stopping a final A's threat in the
- ninth when the Mackmen had two
mn' on base and none out.
Browns Edge Sox, 5.4
BOSTON, July 20-The trouble-
* some- St. Louis Browns pushed a pair
of runs across the plate in the sev-
enth inning today on a trio of singles,
a sacrifice and two walks, to edge
the League leading Boston Red Sox,
5-4, -
Although Jack Kramer was relieved
in the eighth by Tom Ferrick after
Ted- Williams doubled off the left
field wall, he received credit for his
10th victory of the season.
Yanks Blast Chicago, 7-0
NEW YORK, July 20-Three Yank-
ee home runs by Joe Gordon, Rook-

ie Steve Souchock and Aaron Robin-
son helped Spud Chandler record his
14th victory and fourth shutout in
the sweltering heat today, 7-0, over
the Chicago White Sox.
Dodgers Clip Bucs, 4-1
PITTSBURGH, July 20-Brooklyn
scored three unearned runs in the'
eighth today to upend the Pitts-
burgh Pirates, 4-1, despite 11 hits by
the home club.
With two out, Lee Handley let
Dixie Walker's grounder get through
him for an error that enabled Pee
Wee Reese to score. Carl Furillo's
double followed by Bob Ramazotti's
two-run single doomed lefty Ken
Heintzelman to his seventh loss.,
Cubs Nip Phils Twice
. CHICAGO, July 20-The Chicago
Cubs swept a double header from the
Philadelphia Phillies before a paid
crowd of 35,600 in Wrigley Field to-
day, 4-3 and 3-2. Andy Pafko's ninth
inning single decided the opener.

150 yard medely, freestyle, back-
stroke, and breast-stroke.
200 yard freestyle relay-4 men 50
yards apiece.
200 yard freestyle individual.

. I

ss

BBOOat all times
Come in and browse
OVERBECK BOOK STOR
Phone 443 6 1216 South University

-I,

tE

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

DETROIT, July 20-VP)-Play in
the Western Junior and Boys' Tennis
Championships opens Monday at
Cranbrook School in suburban Bloom
Cranbrook School in suburban
Bloomfield Hills, with a field of 91,
including 64 juniors and 27 boys.
Herbie Flam of Berverly Hills,
Calif., and Hugh Stewart, South Pas-'
adena, Calif., 1945 junior winner and
runner-up, respectively, will feature

the competition. Flam is seeded no.
1 and Stewart third. Buddy Behrens,
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., is second seed-
ed.
Dean Mathey; Princeton, N.J., is
seeded fourth; Mac Donald Mathey,
his brother, fifth; Gilbert Shea, Los
Angeles, sixth; Ed Chew, El Paso,
Tex., seventh, and Dick Mouledous,
New Orleans, last year's Western and.
National Boys' titleholder, eighth.

Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the office of the Summer Ses-
sion, Room 1213 Angell Hall by 3:30 p.m.
on the day preceding publication (11:00
a.m. Saturdays).
SUNDAY, JULY 21, 1946
VOL. LVII, No. 148
Notices
Members of the Summer Session
Staff: If you have notfilled in the
Employe's Withholding Exemption
Certificate it is necessary to do so
at once if you expect a check at the
end of the month.
Dependents Schools Services: Rep-
resentatives from Dependents Schools
Services, recruiting teachers for Ger-
many, will meet with al those inter-
ested in these opportunities, on Mon-
day, July 22, at 10 a.m. in 216 Haven
Hall. At this time full information
about conditions of employment, etc.
will be discussed. Individual appoint-
ments will be scheduled on Monday
and Tuesday. Call Bureau of Ap-
pointments for interview - Miss
Briggs, Extension 489.
Mathematics: Copies of the Alex-
ander Ziwet Lectures given by Dr.
Kurt Friedrichs, My 6 to 15, on the
Mathematical Theory of Gas Flow,
Flames and Detonation Waves, are
now available and may be had by
applying at the office of the Depart-
ment of Mathematics, 3012 Angell
Hall.
The YWCA is looking for women
graduate students and senior under-
graduates with sociology, group,
health and physical education majors

who would be interested in working
in an international, interracial and
inter-faith organization. There are
openings for teen age program direc-
tor, business and industrial health
education, and executive director. All
those interested in talking to Miss
Lois McColbch of the National Staff
call the Bureau of Appointments, 201
Mason Hall, ext. 371, for further in-
formation..
Lectures
Colton Storm, Curator of Manu-
scripts and Maps at the Clements
Library will give three lectures on
the Collecting of Rare Books, July
22, 23, 24. In the Rare Books Room,
Clements Library, 5:00 p.m.
There will be a lecture by Bernard
Brodie, Associate Professor, Insti-
tute of International Studies, Yale
University, on Monday, July 22 at
8:10 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre. The topic will be "The Ab-
solute Weapon-Military versus Soc-
ial Invention." The public is invit-
ed.

w w W

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Boston ........
New York ....
Detroit..... ..
Washington ...
Cleveland.....
St. Louis .....
Chicagi.......
Philadelphia .. .

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SATURDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7, Chicago 0
St. Louis 5, Boston 4
Detroit 5, Philadelphia 3
Cleveland 10, Washington 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Brooklyn ......
St. Louis.....
Chicago......
Boston ........
Cincinnati
New York .....
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh ....

51
51
46
42
40
36
34
34

34
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MIRON
SLACKS
by
McGregor
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Pastel
Colors

100% Wool

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