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July 06, 1946 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-07-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

American Form Two

Wells Accuses
Royal Family
Of Fascist Link

AMERICAN STORY!

lnguages, Says Norwegian
ON_________________

Snead, Bulla Finish One-T wo
In British Open Golf Tourney

Majior League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

le sharing of a common language
ngland and America is a mixed
ing, Prof. Aasta Stene, of the
ersity of Oslo, Norway, told
bers of the Linguistic Institute
rday.
nglish is mutually intelligible
partially," Prof. Stene explain-

emocrats

0

Narrow Slate
For Convention
LANSING, July 5-(P)--Democra-
tit strategists began narrowing the
list of possible candidates for five
major state offices as delegates to
Saturday's state conventicn began
arriving 'for the pre-convention ban-
quet and informal caucuses.
There were indications however,
that there would be much switching
and trading to satisfy geographical,
nationality, labor and veterans in-
terests before the final slate takes
form.
Slate for Tomorrow
Former Governor Murray D. Van
Wagoner, the gubernatorial nomi-
nee, and his board of advisors did
not expect to come up with a com-
pleted slate until late this evening
or early tomorrow morning.
When they do, however, the con-
vention is expected to follow his
leadership.
Elihminating many of those whose
names had been mentioned as ps-
sibilities before the delegates started
arriving Friday afternoon, early ho-
tel room talk centered about the fol-
lowing possibilities:
Schuler Proposed
For Secretary of State: Charles
Schuler, Muskegon City Clerk; Wil-
liam Connelly, Detroit.
For Attorney General: Thurman
(Sam) Doyle, Menominee, and Noel
Fox, Muskegon.
For Auditor General: Leo J. Now-
icki, former Lieutenant Governor
and Budget ,Director, Detroit, and
John J. Kozaren, of Detroit, present
Wayne County Treasurer who was
defeated for renomination.
For State Treasurer: Kozaren or
Nowicki if- neither is nominated for
the Auditor General post.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Tuesday Sargent key on or
near campus. Phone 7036.
FOR SALE
BOIS BLANC ISLAND: A beautiful
cabin with 2-story living room and
cobblestone fire place completely
furnished, 11/2 acres overlooking
Mackinaw Island. Ready to move
in. Complete book of pictures
available. A bargain. Don't miss
this one. Inquire Wi. - .Kirby,
Realtor, 500 Michigan Bank Bldg.,
Detroit
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Experienced lino-
type operator in union shop. Per-
manent position. No layoffs. For-
ty hour week. Scale, $1.55 an hour,
highest in state for comparable
cities. Modern plant in residential
suburban city. Daily Tribune, Roy-
al Oak, Michigan.
MANUFACTURER of temperature
instruments wants engineering stu-
dent for part-time work in Ann
Arbor. Hourly basis to suit your
schedule. Write, stating age, year
in school, and hours 'available be-
tween 8 and 5 each day. H. 0.
Trerice Company, 1420 W. Lafay-
ette Blvd., Detroit, 16, Michigan.
MISCELLANEOUS
TUTORING IN ENGLISH for For-
eign Students. Call at 527 Church
St., No. 7. Near South University.
ALL MEMBERS of Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity enrolled in the summer
session contact Bernard E. Burke,
K.R.S. 311 Glen'Ave., by postal
card.
B3ROKEN STRINGS in your tennis

racquet? Call at 2-7360 for over-
night service or restringing. I pick
u pand deliver. Dean McClusky,
417 8th St.
FOR RENT
ANY GIRL interested in sharing ideal
apartment including piano near
campus, call 4813 immediately.

ed, "and the failure of Americans
to understand what Englishmen mean
by their words, and vice-versa, may
lead to more misunderstandings than
would arise if they spoke entirely
different languages.-
Miss Stene was a visiting professor
at the University of Wisconsin dur-
ing the past winter. She acquired
her knowledge of English through
study at the Universities of London
and Cambridge, but found it neces-
sary to make extensive modifications
in the spoken language when she
came to America.
"Although the grammar and vo-
cabulary of English and American
are essentially the same," she said,
"there are wide differences in tempo,
pitch and intonation of the spoken
language. For example, Americans
speak more loudly than the British,
leading to the popular judgment in
England that Americans are bad-
mannered and rude. This same dif-
ference causes Americans to judge
the English as being unfriendly and
standoffish."
Prof. Stene spoke at the first of a
series of public programs which will
be given by the Linguistic Institute.
Other speakers who will be presented
by the Institute, which continues
through August 23, are Dr. Kenneth
Pike, University of Oklahoma; Dr.
Edgar H. Sturtevant, Yale Univer-
sity; Dr. F. W. Twadell, Brown Uni-
versity; Dr. Eugene Nida, University
of Oklahoma; Dr. Adelaide Hahn,
Hunter College, and Dr. Milton Cown,
American Council of Learned Societ-
ies.
Army To Begin
Return of All
Overseas Dead
Peacetime procedure of returning
to the United States for burial mem-
bers of the Army who died in mili-
tary service overseas became effec-
tive July 1.
This procedure has not been fol-
lowed since Sept. 3, 1939, the date
of limited National Emergency.
In cases of deaths of Army per-
sonnel overseas after July 1, the
Quartermaster Corps will not inter
bodies in temporary cemeteries but
will hold them in mortuary chapels
at overseas stations until the next
available transportation, either Army
transport or commercial carrier.
Current deaths are not to be con-
fusedwith deaths during military
operations. Those who died in mili-
tary .operations or subsequnt to
v-J Day, but before July 1, are bur-
ied in temporary military cemeter-
ies overseas. Final disposition of their
remains will be made according to
the wishes expressed by next of kin
following a questionnaire which will
be sent to next of kin, according to
a program which is now being care-
fully worked out by the Office of
the Quartermaster General, Wash-
ington, D.C.
Mobs Kill 34 Jews
In Polish Pogrom
WARSAW, July 5-AP) - Mobs
rampaging through the streets of
Kielce in Poland's bloodiest post-
war pogrom killed at least 34 per-
sons and injured 42 others, mostly
Jews, before government armored
cars dispelled the anti-Jewish rioters
and restored order today to that
city of 60,000.
Unverified reports said that some
militiamen and security police also
were killed in battling the mobs,
which smashed shops and invaded
Jewish homes and apartments yes-
terday. Further check of the dead
and injured may cause an upward
revision of casualties.
The government charged that "fas-
cist elements" set off the pogrom,
perhaps started by false reports

spread by a Polish boy who claimed
to have been held in a cellar by Jews
who threatened to slay him. Another
rumor was that a Polish baby had
been killed by Jews.

Writer
House

Says British
Aided Italians

DESCRIBES ACTIVITIES-Ma-
jor ,General William N. Porter
(above), retired chief of the Army
Chemical Warfare Service, tells the
Mead Senate War Investigating
committee that Rep. Andrew J.
May (Dem., KO), chairman of the
House Military Committee, inter-
vened three times with the Army
on behalf of an Illinois munitions
combine whose war profits are
under congressional investigation.

Lectures ...0

(Continued from Page 1)
speak on "Psychology of Social
Change" at 4:10 p.m. and Prf. Wil-
liam F. Ogburn, of the University
of Chicago, will deliver an address
on "How Technology Changes Socie-
ty" at 8:10 p.m.
Prof. Bernard Brodie, of Yale Uni-
versity, will discuss "The Absolute
Weapon-Military versus Social In-
vention," at 8:10 p.m. Monday, July
22. "The Political Impact of Modern
Science on Public Health" is the
topic of a lecture by Prof. Gaylord
W. Anderson, of the University of
Minnesota, at 8:10 p.m. Tuesday,
July 23.
"Recent Advances in Medicine" is
the subject to be discused by Prof.
Albert C. Furstenberg, dean of the
University medical school, at 4:10
p.m. Thursday, July 25, and Prof.
Robert E. Cushman, of Cornell Uni-
versity wil speak on "Civil Liberties
in the Atomic Age" at 8:10 p.m.
Dr. Warren S. Thompson, of Miami
University, wil discuss "The Impact
of Science on Population Growth"
at 8:10 p.m. Tuesday, July 30. Thurs-
day, August 1, Prof. Howard B. Lewis,
director of the University College of
Pharmacy, will speak on "Nutrition"
at 4:10 p.m.
Monday, August 5, Dr. John W.
Studebaker, United States Commis-
sioner of Education, will deliver an
address on "The High School Cur-
riculum in a New World" at 4:10
p.m., and at 8:10 p.m. Prof. Howard
A. Meyerhoff, of Smith College, will
speak on "Some Social Implications
of Natural Resources."
Prof. Louis Wirth, of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, will discuss "Social
Science Research and the Impact
of Science upon Society" at 8:10 p.m.
Tuesday, August 6. "Good, Evil, and
Beyond" is the topic of a talk by
George N. Shuster, president of
Hunter College, at 8:10 p.m. Thurs-
day, August 8, and Dean E. Blythe
Stason, of the University Law School,
will speak on "Technology, Law, and
Administration" at 4:10 p.m.
"Economic Changes Produced by
Modern Technology" will be discus-
sed by Prof. Sumner H. Slichter of
Harvard . University, at 8:10 p.m.
Tuesday, August 13. Prof. William
Haber, of the University economics
department, will speak on "Security
and Freedom" at 4:10 p.m. Wednes-
day, August 14.
The 20th lecture will be delivered
by Dean Hayward Keniston, of the
literary college, at 4:10 p.m. Thurs-
day, August 15, on "The Humanities
in a Scientific World." Concluding
the series is Dr. Arthur H. Compton,
chancellor of Washington University,
who will speak on "Atomic Energy,
a Human Asset" at 8:10 p.m. Friday,
August 16.
No. Main - Opposite Court House
-- Starting Today -
Eddie Dean in
ROMANCE OF THE WEST
(in Technicolor)

LONDON, July 5-W)-H. G. Wells,
in an almost unprecendented attack
upon a British King's family, asked
publicly today whether the Royal
Family was involved in the "huge"
sums which, the House of Commons
was told recently, the Italian govern-
ment of Benito Mussolini paid to Sir
Oswald Mosley, British Fascist lead-
er, before the war.
The 79-year-old novelist and his-
torian declared in an article in the
magazine Socialist Leader that if the
Royal Family were involved, "Then
there is every reason why the House
of Hanover should follow the House
of Savoy into the shadows of exile
and leave England free to return to
its old and persistent republican tra-
dition."
Buckingham Palace authorities
could not be reached for comment
on Wells' blast-one of the very
few attacks on the Royal Family to
appear in a British publication in
many years.
The Socialist Leader is published
weekly by the Independent Labor
Party, left-wing offshoot of the Labor
Party.
Wells said of the British Royal
Family:
"Even this German-ruled . . .
monarchy which links the English
with the crumbling monarchist sys-
tem of the world is menaced by a
gathering accumulation of revela-
tions. Things are coming out and
they are bound to come out.
"Why cannot these tainted people
do the sane and patriotic thing while
they may still be treated with consid-
eration?
"Now they can be bought out and
set apart with the sort of dignity and
honors they value. Later on, their
dismissal may have to be ruder."
Suggesting that a "royal reserve"
for exiled kings and queens be creat-
ed "in America or elsewhere, where
people appear to be hungry for uni-
forms and titles," Wells said:
"The genuine democratic com-
munities throughout the world need
to know what is going on in this
hushed-up business of the huge
Mosley funds and how far our own
Royal Family is involved in this
affair.
Archeologist To
Continue Work.
Greenmnan Leaves for
Ontario Huron Site
Dr. Emerson F. Greenman, well-
known University archaeologist and
anthropologist leaves this morning
for Killarney, Ontario, on the north
shore of Lake Huron, to continue his
explorations on sites of early Ameri-
can culture, ranging in age from
1400 to over 10,000 years old.
Dr. Greenman began his excava-
tions in 1938 and has continued
them since, in cooperation with the
Canadian government. He has found
evidence which has led some leading
authorities to the opinion that the
early primitive tribes of northeastern
North America may have come from
western Europe, rather than from
eastern Asia.
Five students will accompany Dr.
Greenman, who will instruct them
in Archaeological Field Methods.
They expect to return in early Sep-
tember.
Back the
Famine Drive
Continuous from 1 P.M.
ALWAYS COOL!

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland, July 5-
(P)-Outsteadying a jittery field in
a strong wind, Sam Snead won the
first postwar British Open Golf
Championship today with a 72-hole
total of 290, winning back for
America the trophy it had not held
since 1933.
The rounds of the slammer from
Petra Outlasts
Brown for Title
At Wimbledon
WIMBLEDON, July 5-(P)-Thir-
ty-year-old Yvon Petra, who sold his
Paris sidewalk cafe six months ago
to concentrate on tennis, reaped the
first big dividend today when he de-
feated Geoff Brown, 23-year-old
Australian, in a hard-fought final of
the All-England Championships, 6-2,
6-4, 7-9, 5-7, 6-4.
The giant Frenchman, whose six-
feet, seven inches earned him the
nickname "Eiffel Tower," subdued
his much smaller opponent with a
whistling service and smashing game
at the net.
An All-American final was assured
in women's doubles tomorrow when
the top seeded teams of Louise
Brough and Margaret Osborne and
Pauline Betz and Doris Hart came
through on schedule in. today's semi-
finals.
The Misses Broughdand Osborne,
four-time American doubles cham-
pions, had little difficulty subduing
their Wightman Cup teammates,
Dorothy Bundy and Mrs. Patricia
Canning Todd, 6-4, 6-2, but the Betz-
Hart combination was given a real
scrap before it advanced over Mrs.
Kay Stammers Menzies and Mrs.
Jean Nicoll Bostock of Britain by
3-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Cullenbine's .Bat
Beats 'Cleveland
DETROIT, July 5-P)-Grabbing
the slugger's role heretofore reserved
for Hank Greenberg, outfielder Roy
Cullenbine of the Detroit Tigers plas-
tered two honmers today and drove
in four runs as Detroit took a 7 to
5 twilight decision over the Cleve-
land Indians.
Virgil (Fire) Trucks coasted to his
10th pitching victory after the Ti-
gers scored three runs in the fifth
inning for a 4-0 lead. Trucks went
all the way to yield nine hits, two
more than the Tigers collected oft
Red Embree and Don Black.

White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., were
71-70-74 and 75, and the 290 was
two under par for the famous old
St. Andrews course. The last Ameri-
can to win the title was Denny Shute.
Second to Sammy with scores of
294 were Johnny Bulla, another
American who also was second in
the last British Open played in 1939,
and South Africa's Bobby Locke. It
looked for a while as though each
of them had missed a golden oppor-
tunity to win by missing two-footers
and three putting the home green,
but as it turned out it made no dif-
ference because Snead, burning up
the second nine behind them in two
under par finished four strokes in
front.
Back of Bulla and Locke at 295
were the veteran Henry Cotton, lea-
der of the field when play started
this morning; little Dai Rees, who
fired a record 67 yesterday; Norman.
Von Nida, the Australian, and
Charley Ward, 34-year-old British
professional.
The two other American pros-
Joe Kirkwood and Lawson Little-
finished further back in the field.
Kirkwood faltered badly in his morn-
ing round today with a 78 and finish-
ed with 298, and Little carded a 299.
Both turned in 74's for the final
round.
The 33-year-old Snead's prize mo-
ney amounts to only 150 pounds
($600) but as this is one of the major
international golf events it will be
worth much more to him in pres-
tige and exhibition fees when he re-
turns home. Bulla estimated earlier
this week that an American pro
could make $20,000 out of the title.
Snead did not make an estimate.
Snead is flying back to the United
States July 9 and will play in a
tournament in Kansas City July 11.

Boston .......
New York. . .
Detroit.......
Washington ..
St. Louis ..,.. .
Cleveland.....
Chicago. ..
Philadelphia

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 5, Philadelphia 2
Washington 6, New York 1
St. Louis 1, Chicago 0
Detroit 7, Cleveland-5
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Detroit
Chicago at Cleveland (N)
Boston at Washington (N)
New York at Philadelphia (N)
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Brooklyn .......46 25 .648'.,.
St. Louis....... 40 31 .567 6
Chicago....... 37 32 .536 8
Cincinnati .... 33 34 .491 11
Boston........33 38 .465 13
Philadelphia.. 30 36 .455 13x
New York......30 41 .422 16
Pittsburgh .. 29 41 .414 16%
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7, Brooklyn 6
St. Louis 1, Chicago 0
Cincinnati 4, Pittsburgh 3
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Boston. (N)
Philadelphia at New York
Cincinnati at Chicago
Pittsburgh at St. Louis
Red Sox Rally Tops Aff's
PHILADELPHIA, July 5-(AP -
Bunching four runs in the eighth
inning, th Boston Rd Sox wallopci
the Philadelphia Athletics tonight,
5-2. An estimatd 25,000 arc-light
fans watched Joe Dobson limit the
Mackmen to five hits.

W
52
45
40
36
34
34
27
21

L
22
30
32
34
39
40
43
59

Pet.
.703
.600
.555
.514
.466
.459
.386
.300

GB
7
11
. 14
171/.
18
23
29

r

MICHIGAN

Now Showing

Memories
of Hawaii

Let's Go Cartoon
Gunning and News

;;:

Coming
Sunday

"SMOKY"

Will James' Story
in Technicolor

F
i

/3a cical

Cxperierwe

in

RDVE RTI SING

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a-u-

Last Day Today
TARZAN AND THE
LEOPARD WOMAN
and
GIRL ON THE SPOT
-- Sunday & Monday -
LITTLE GIANT
with Abbott & Costello
and
BORN FOR TROUBLE
with Van Johnson

Last Times Today
HEX tm
UFRUSTY'
TED
DONALDSON
MARK
T DENNIS
A O M A Pi TR
Coming Sunday
0 ter A

plus
Stephanie Bachelor in
PASSKEY TO -DANGER!
News and Serial

4.

I

""NI

ART CINEMA LEAGUE,
INTERNATIONAL SUMMER PROGRAM
WEDNESDAY, July 10 . "HEART OF PARIS" (French) with Raimnu,
THURSDAY, July 11 Michele Morgan
THURSDAY, July 18 "THE WILDFLOWER" (Spanish)
FRIDAY, July 19 with Dolores Del Rio
TH-4 }R,' PA'Y' irly 29 "ARRIAC AND T ITRICE" (9 Raimal

TRY-OUT MEETING TUESDAY, JULY 9th
AT 3:00 P.M.

I MV - Ii inuu U I

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