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July 22, 1945 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-07-22

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PAGE TWO

THE IMICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 194

- _, _ _.. _

Conference

IWO VETS FROWN ON WAR FILAS:
Marines Favor Movies with Girls

'Frisco Parley IRA TO YEAR CIO VIEWS:
Is Dr. Slosson's Marq'uard To S

To Play Host
To Educators
High School Officials
Will Gather Tuesday
One hundred fifty school superin-
tendents representing institutions
throughout the state will attend the
annual Guidance and Placement
Conference sponsored by the Univer-
sity Bureau of Appointments and Oc-
cupational Information at 7:30 p.m.
EWT (6:30 p.m. CWT) Tuesday in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Purpose of the meeting is to ac-
quaint superintendents and teachers
with postwar problems in education.
Purdem to Speak
Dr. T. Luther,'Purdom, director of
the University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and chairman of the confer-
ence, will discuss "Immediate Prob-
lems of Replacement of Civilians,"
and Charles L. Anspant, president of
Central Michigan College of Educa-
tion, Mr. Pleasant, will analyze a co-
operative study made by placement
bureaus of colleges in Michigan on
"Supply, Demand and Placement of
Teachers."
Discussion of Veterans
Other conference speakers include
Ben R. Marsh, vice-president of
Michigan Bell Telephone Company,
Detroit, who will talk on the "Post-
war Program of Michigan Bell Tele-
phone Company" and William O'Neil,
director of the Yanks Service Bureau
of The Chicago Sun, whose topic is
"Veterans' Educational Problems and
Their Effect on Public Education."
Marsh and O'Neil are both Univer-
sity graduates and Anspach received
his Ph. D..here.
MosCow Requests
Alumnus Magazine
The end of the war in Europe took
on a special meaning this week for
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of Alumni Association.
He received a reply to a letter
written a year and a half ago to a
Russian university.
In February, 1944, Tapping wrote
to 85 universities all over the world
offering to exchange Quarterly issue
of The Alumnus. All except the Rus-
sian universities replied. A few days
ago M. Gorki Scientific Library of
the Moscow State University wrote
that it would be "extra grateful" to
receive the Quarterly Review Issues.
BUY WAR BONDS
* * ** ** * ** * * ******* **
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a Man"dd can be

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* * *

* * *

By U. S. Marine Corps News
SOMEWHERE IN THE PACIFIC
(Delayed) - Entertainment values
have changed but little for Marines
in the three years since Guadalcanal.
Leathernecks still prefer movies -
usually because there is nothing else
to "prefer," according to Sgt. Bill
Ross, Marine Corps combat corre-
spondent.
"Movies are better now 4han they
were in the 'old days' and we get
them from the States a lot faster,"
said Marine Lt. Everett G. Force of
Valdosta, Ga., motion picture officer
of the Third Marine Division.
The men, however, still want much
the same type of movies as when the
scope of Marine offensive operations
in the Pacific was limited to the
Solomon Islands, according to the
lieutenant.
Survey Shows Preferences
A survey of the Leathernecks of
the Third Division, upon their return
from the conquest of Iwo Jima, re-
vealed the following preferences in
types of movies:
First: Musicals (With Girls).
Second: Comedies (With Girls).
Third: Mysteries (With Girls).
Fourth: Dramas (With Girls).
Definitely on top of the "not want-
ed" list of films are war pictures. The
men who fought on Bougainville,
Guam and Iwo Jima don't even both-
er to explain why they'd almost
rather sit through a mortar barrage
than a "flag-waver," as they call war
movies. Out-of-date newsreels, ac-
cording to Lt. Force, also "are strict-
ly from hunger." And second-rate
"quickie" westerns are shunned like a
Japanese ambush.
Behind the showing of movies in
the Pacific is one of the untold stories
of the Pacific war. To get the films
from the movie lots of Hollywood to
the fighting fronts is, in itself, a vast
and complex job.
Film During Iwo Fighting
An example of the speed with which
pictures are handled can be found in
the fact that the movie "Saratoga
Trunk" was shown on Iwo Jima while
savage fighting was in progress, and
before the film had been exhibited in
any but the key cities back home.
Prints of movies shown to Marines
are found by a special section of the
Navy Department in San Francisco
and New York. All film is flown over-
seas and from 25 to 30 new pictures-
virtually all of Hollywood's output-
are received in the war zones each
month.
"Of course we get 'stinkers''now
and then," said a Marine private, a
projectionist who used to manage a
chain of six theaters in Texas and

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Louisiana, "but we used to get them
more often."
Bob Hope and Bing Crosby hold top
rank with the men of the Third Ma-
rine Division-in any movie, old or
new, Betty Grable, Judy Garland and
Gene Tierney are prime feminine fa-
vorites.
Like Re-Issues of Hit
Technicolor movies really hit ' the
spot and when it's a musical in color,
"Mac, it's right on," says more than
one Marine. Curiously enough,
Leathernecks don't mind re-issues of
outstanding hit pictures of former
years. "It Happened One Night,"
"Lost Horizon," "100 Men And A
Girl," and similar top-notch films are
in great demand. 0
"We've learned a lot of knacks that
make outdoor sound better, and the
pictures, too," Lt. Force explained.
Regular periods of examination and
repair on projectors and sound equip-
ment, he said, virtually has elimi-
nated breakdowns while films are be-
ing shown.

Now and then the outdoor cinemas
give way momentarily to "live" pro-
ductions: USO shows and home-tal-
ent affairs. But, by and large, enter-
tainment in the vast reaches of the
Pacific still comes from movies.
Sit Through Rain-Storms
Each evening, seven nights a week,
you'll see Marines-with improvised
chairs in hand-head for their re-
spective movie areas. They sit through
tropical rain-storms to see movies.
They sit on empty oil-drums to see
them. They sit in cocoanut groves
and on hillsides where fierce fighting
raged in the recent past.
"I was a once-a-week movie-goer
before the war," said Pvt. Raymond
J. O'Brien of Shreveport, La., "but
now I'm an 'everyniter'."
And the funny part about it is that
Marine O'Brien, like most of the other
Leathernecks, won't think of going
to a movie for at least six months
when he returns to the States.
"Then I'll be a twice-a-week man,"
he said.

Topic for Today
Lecture Will Be Given
At Williams Guild
Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department wil speak on the
San Francisco Conference at the
Roger Williams Guild, 502 E. Wil
liams,, at 5 p. in. EWT (4 p. m. CWT)
today.
Serving as assistant librarian to
the American Commission to Nego-
iate Peace after Wcrld War I, Prof.
Slosson spent one year in Versailles.
He was honored by an appointment
as Carnegie visiting professor to the
Universities of Bristol, Manchester
and Glasgow in 1932-33, and received
a similar appointment to the Univer-
sity of Bristol in 1933-39.
Formerly an assistant in the De-
partment of History at Columbia
University, Prof. Slosson has been
teaching at the University since 1921.
He studied at Columbia University,
receiving his B. S. degree in 1912,
his M. A. in 1913 and his Ph. D. in
1916.
The author of several books, Prof.
Slosson, in collaboration with Pro-
fessors A. E. R. Boak and Albert M.
Hyma wrote the textbook "The
Growth of European Civilization,"
which is used in the University His-
tory 11 and 12 classes. Some other
books which he has written are "The
Decline of the Chartist Movement,"
"Twentieth Century Europe," and
"Europe Since 1870."
Yale Professor
Will Address
LingQuist Group
Two scholars from other campuses
have been invited by the Linguistic
Institute to speak at public lectures
this week.
Dr. Edgar H. Sturtevant, profes-
sor of linguistics at Yale University,
will give the Wednesday evening spe-
cial lecture at 7:30 p. m. EWT (6:30
p. m. CWT) in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre. His subject will be "Three
Thousand Years of Greek." Dr.
Sturtevant, who was president of the
Linguistic Society of America in 1931
and president of the American Orient-
al Society in 1936, has taught Greek
and Latin at Yale and other univer-
sities and has conducted researches
in the history of the Greek language.
At the Thursday luncheon confer-
ence at 1 p. m. EWT (noon CWT), in
the ABC room of the Michigan
League, Dr. E. Adelaide Hahn, pro-
fessor and head of the department
of Latin and Greek at Hunter Col-
lege, New York City, will discuss the
question "Were the Moods Tenses?"
While she will draw illustrations of
her statements especially from Greek
and Latin, it is expected that the
problems raised will be of interest to
scholars in other language fields as
well. Luncheon at noon EWT '(11 a.
m. CWT) in the League Ballroom
will precede the conference.
The series of introductory lectures
on linguistic science by members of
the Institute's staff will continue
with Prof. Franklin Edgerton speak-
ing Tuesday and Thursday at 7 p. m.
EWT (6 p. m. CWT) in the Rackham
Amphitheatre. In his lecture Tues-
day, "Limitations and Dangers of
the Comparative Method," he will
re-examine Indo-European compara-
tive grammar in the light of recent
principles and methods developed in
linguistic study. His topic Thursday
will be "Analogical Creation of New
Linguistic Patterns."

"Labor and Racial Discrimination"
will be the subject of a lecture before
the Inter-Racial Association by
Frank Marquard, educational direc-
tor of the International Union, Unit-
ed Automobile, Aircraft and Agricul-
tural Implement Workers of America
(UAW-CIO), Local No. 212, at 7:30
p. m. EWT (6:30 p. m. CWT) Mon-
day in the Michigan Union.
Mr. Marquard has written several
pamphlets for distribution to union
members, dealing with the problem
of eliminating prejudice within the
manufacturing plants and within the
union itself.
Anti-Prejudice Program
In these pamphlets, Mr. Marquard
has stated that these steps must oe
taken to avoid. discrimination: in-
crease local union democracy; form
an interracial or anti-discrimination
committee in each local union; make
known and enforce the union's pol-

1 4

BRIDGE SET

S

These gay bridge sets in prints and
pastels make lovely gifts. W'e also have
a fine selection of breakfast and bridge
cloths in new summer colors.

icy; insist upon a fair hiring policy;
insist upon a fair policy in upgrading
and promotion; enforce union disci-
pline; preserve equal seniority rights;
improve living conditions; make
room for fair play; examine the pub-
lic schools; and perpetually educate
and publicize.
Committee's Function
Mr. Marquard outlined his fund-
tions as educational director in a re-
cent interview when he said, "The
education committee's fundamental
job is to foster democratic thinking
and democratic action. It must stay
on the offensive against all union-
splitting forms of intolerance, dis-
crimination and segregation."
Representing labor, Mr. Mar-
quard's lecture is the third in the
current IRA series entitled "Tech-
niges for Eliminating Racial Dis-
crimination in Your Community."
The public is invited to attend the
lecture.

Always Reasonably Priced
GAGE LINEN SHOP

On 'Labor, Racial Prejudice'

I

10 NICKELS ARCADE

i

"

.. .. . .

{ 'tr t mi,. 9 odern Cadfi~ - i T TiT~
NOW SHOWING ELA&

MICHIGAN MEN AT WAR

SHOCKED

TO DEATH?
* Amercan war doctors declare
that-apart from the injury itself
-the very shock and pain of being
wounded in action can kill a fight-
ing man.
That's why every American sol-
dier, sailor, and marine who is
wounded in combat needs a
"syrette." A "syrette," you know, is
a miniature hypodermic with the
merciful power to allay pain and
shock.
That's a good thing for you to
know - you folks who regularly
prepare and save all your empty
tin cans for collection and salvage.
For-there's enough pure tin in
only 2 ordinary tin cans to make
one "syrette."
So, by preparing all your tin
cans for salvage you're helping to
provide tin needed for the produc-
tion of "syrettes"-and countless
other vitally needed articles of
war equipment.
Remember...TIN is a "precious
metal" that goes to war in hundreds
of ways. TIN helps make protective
containers for blood plasma, medi-
cines, foods. TIN goes into every
field telephone and radio, into every

EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributions to this
column should be addressed to Michi-
gan Men at War, The Michigan Daily,
Student Publications Building.
Cmdr. J. PARKE SAGER, USN, has
been awarded the Legion of Merit and
the Air Medal for exceptionally mer-
itorious service in ceremonies aboard
a seaplane tender in the Southwest
Pacific. Presented the citations
while serving as war plans and ma-
terial officer for Aircraft, Seventh
Fleet, he has now been transferred
to duty in the United States.
A graduate of the University,
where he also received a master's
degree in aeronautical engineering,
Cmdr. Sager entered the Navy as an
aviation cadet in 1935.
* *t *
Now located at the Great Bend

Army Air Field, Great Bend, Kan-
sas, Second Lieutenants LUTHER
M. SAND WICK, Jr., a bombardier
on a combat crew, and NESTOR O.
VELASCO, a navigator on a com-
bat crew, are in Bombardment
Groups stationed at that B-29
operational training base of the
Second Air Force. Both Lt. Sand-
wick and Lt. Velasco attended the
University and have been in mili-
tary service since 1943.
* * *
Recently assigned to John H.
Payne Field, Cairo, Egypt, was First
Lieutenant CLIFFORD K. RIDING-
ER. A student at the University
prior to entering the service, Lt.
Ridinger will take part in the in-
creased activity at Payne Field, which
is the center for USAAF Air Trans-
port Command traffic movements
through the Middle East to the Asi-
atic Theatre of Operations.
Lieutenant ROBERT S. JUHL,
'39, recently returned from the
Mediterranean Area, where he
commanded a minesweeper, has
been temporarily assigned to duty
at the Minecraft Training Center

of the Atlantic Fleet at Little
Creek, Va. Lt. Juhl wears the
American Defense Ribbon, and the
American Theatre and European-
African-Middle Eastern Theatre
campaign bars, the latter with two
combat stars for the invasions of
Normandy and Southern France.
Recently graduated from an ad-
vanced communications course at
Boca Baton Army Air Field, Fla.,
was LIEUTENANT RALPH L. WIL-
LOUGHBY, whose parents reside in
Ann Arbor. Prior to entering ser-
vice, Lt. Willoughby attended the
University.
Senate Asks Release of
30,000 Army Coal Miners
WASHINGTON, July 21-0)-The
Senate sent back to its military com-
mittee today a resolution asking re-
lease of 30,000 coal miners from the
Army to help relieve the coal short-
age. The War Department announced
meanwhile that a group of German
prisoners would be sent back to
Europe to man coal mines there.

- -1
DIREDCTORY
WANTED
WANTED: A good 35 mm. camera,
preferably a Leica or Contax. Call
2-4481. Ask for Nando.
HELP WANTED
MEN: The hospital needs you. Janit-
ors, orderlies, and wall washers are
needed. Part time orderly positions
available in evening. Apply person-
nel office, Room 1022, Univ. Hosp.
STUDENT HELP WANTED in din-
ing room at Pinafore. Meals or
cash. Call 6737.
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND: Exnensive fountain pen on
campus nursday, July 19. Call
Pat Albin 2-2228.
LOST: Gold Marine bracelet. Re-
ward. Call Renee Kaire, 2-3225.
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARD FOR SUMMER TERM
available at 816 Forest. Good food,
all meals. Call 5974.

STARTS TODAY!
.o

66-

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

SUN., JULYa22, 1945
Eastern War 'ime
8 :00-News.
8:05-Organ Music.
8:15-Jimmy Wakely.
8:30-Frankie Masters.
9:00-News.
9:05-Ralph Ginsburg.
9:30-Ava Maria Hour.
10:00-News.
10:15-Edmond Pierson.
10:30-Charlie Barnett.
10:45-Jesse Crawford.
11:00-News.

11:05-Bethlehem Evangeli-
cal Reformed,
12:00-News.
12:05-Mario Morell.
12:30-Music & Verse.
12:45-Paul Baron.
1:00-News.
1:15-Baseball Brevities.
1:25-Baseball (Det. at
Phila.)
5:00-News.
5:15--Johnny Long.
5:30--Imperial Male Chorus
5:45-Dance Music.
6:00-News.

0:05--Wilson Ames.
6:15-Grace Bible Fellow-
ship.
6:30-Concert Hall.
7:00-News.
7:05-Let's Dance.
7:25--Band of the Week.
7:30-Jerry Sears.
7:45-Eleanor Meston.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.
8:15-Howard Farrar.
8:30-Daniel Leiberfeld.
9:00-News.
9:05-Milt Herth Trio.

OPEN! TO SERVE YOU
Cfejf'ee ?.'4onu t4
liA - 4 11

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