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July 20, 1945 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1945-07-20

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20, 1945

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I:
~~~1

NEWS +VIEWS+COMMENT
By BILL MULLENDORE, Daily Sports Editor
OR QUITE SOME TIME, there has been a considerable movement in
professional golfdom to do something about lowering par figures for
the boys who regularly turn in scores well below the present standardr.
Now that Byron Nelson, who seems to be something of a superman in
golf, has come upon the scene, there seems to be some good reason
for the agitation.
Rarely has one figure dominated the field in any sport as has
Lord Byron in golf. This year's tournament circuit has been a monoto-
nous round of Nelson victories with the main interest centering
around the battle for second place. Nelson, for the time being
anyway, has the field all to himself,
In the process, Nelson has busted Old Man Par so many times that
the old gentleman must feel pretty well beaten by now. Par on the
average 18-hole course is 72, and the figure may be accepted as stand-
ard in , tournament play. Nelson has been averaging around 68 strokes
for 18 holes, and when any golfer, no matter how good he is, can con-
sistently chop four strokes off par figures, then something ought to be
done about par figures.
The process by which par was determined is just a little obscure.
It certainly doesn't apply to the average golfer, who is doing well if
he shoots in the middle 80's and very well indeed if he can get down
into the high 70's. Once upon a time, it may have been a good test
for the pros, but that time is long since past. The professional golfer
who can shoot no better than par golf in a major tournament is now
nothing more than an also-ran.
]VELSON is not the only golfer who consistently gives par' a drubbing.
N The Byrds, the McSpadens, the Hogans, the Sneads, and the rest of
them do pretty well for themselves, although not quite as well as Nelson.
Even the top-flight amateurs and the lesser-known pros turn in sub-par
cards with monotonous regularity.
In our opinion, par figures in golf should mean something. As
matters now stand, they don't mean a thing. To the Sunday golfer--
Mr. Average Man-they represent something unattainable. To the pro,
they stand for a convenient figure which has to be considerably bettered
in order to make any money,
f. The proposal about to be made here is one that has been put forth
many times in other places, discussed at great length, and lost somewhere
in the shuffle. In essence, it can be stated in a question: Why not have
two sets of par figures, one for the dub and one for the pro?
Give Mr. Average something to shoot at, something within the
limits of his abilities and time for practice. Just what the final
number would be can be left to the experts, but it seems to, us that
something in the neighborhood of 80 might do for a start.
As for the professionals, it would seem advisable to clip at least
four strokes off present 18-hole figures. In other words, fix par at 68
and let the boys shoot at that for awhile. Then maybe a par round
would mean something.
BERNIE'S IN LUCK:
Minnesota Grid Squad Boasts
16-Veterans in Summer Drill

Speed Is Theme for
Grid Line Candidates
Keen Competiti~o for Sawtitig Berths
Marks First Three Weeks 4f Practice

SOMETHING SHOULD BE DONE ABOUT HIM-By ron Nelson (right) receives the championship cup
from PGA President Ed Dudley at Dayton, O., as Sam Byrd (left), loser in the title match, looks on. Lord
Byron, par-breaker extraordinary, is responsible for c urrent talk of lowering the present average score.

DODGERS, CARDS LOSE:
Cubs Gain in Senior Cireuito
Three AL Games Postploned

CHICAGO, July 19-M- Hank
Wyse notched his seventh straight
mound victory today, with a five-hit
performance that gave the first-
place Chicago Cubs a 3-1 triumph
over the Brooklyn Dodgers before a
paid crowd of 10,128. It was Wyse's
13th win of the season.
Dixie Walker robbed Wyse of a
shutout when he singled across
pinch-hitter Morrie Aderholt fron
second in the ninth frame for his
74th RBI of the season.
Until the ninth inning, Wyse all-
lowed only two Dodgers as far as
second and had scattered three sin-
gles. In the final frame, Aderholt led
off with a single, moved to second on
an infield out and scored on Walk-
er's one-bagger.
Singles by Bill Nicholson. Andy
Pafko, and Peanuts Lowrey scored
the first Cub tally. The seventh in-
ning pair came on singles by Dewey
Wililams, Wyse, and Roy Johnson, a
sacrifice by Len Merullo, and a walk
to Stan Hack.
Brooklyn 000 000 001-1 5.0
Chicago 000 100 200-3 9 0
Lombardi, King and Andrews,
Sandlock; Wyse and Williams.
* * *
Pirates Blank Cards, 4-0
PITTSBURGH, July 19-(1P)-Rip
Sewell allowed the New York Giants
eight hits but shut them out. 4 to 0,
as the Pittsburgh Pirates won the
third game of a series tonight before
14,168 fans.
The first run cane in the first in-
ning on two walks, a double by Jim-

my Russell and a long fly by Johnny
Barrett.
Bill Ealkeld's seventh home run of
the season, off Ace Adams, who had
relieved Harry Feldman, drove in
three runs to sew up the game for the
Pirates.
New York 000 000 000-0 8 1
Pittsburgh 100 000 030-4 8 0
Feldman, Adams (8) and Klutz;
Sewell and Salkeld.
Sox Tangle: Whites Whin
BOSTON, July 19---)-Refusing
to take advantage of Thorny Lee's
generosity, the Boston: Red Sex to-
day waded many scoring opportuni-
ties while taking o 5-3 setback from
the Chicago White Sox.
The Chisox collected nine of their
12 hits and all but one of their tal-
lies off starter Emmett O'Neill duri-
ing the first seven innings. The other
counter was Johnny Dickshot's ninth
inning homer.
Jimmy Dykes' forces broke a 3-3
tie in the sixth when Tony Cuccinello
doubled and scored on Cass Michael's
single.
Chicago 100 021 001-5 12 0
Boston 100 020 000-3 9 1
Lee and Tresh; O'Neill, Byba and
Gartark.
Night Game Scores
NATIONAL LEAGUE-Boston, 3, 6,
Cincinnati, 4, 5. Philadelphia, 3, St.
Louis, 2.

vid you know?
By Herbert Ruskin
. That Michigan teams under the
coaching of Matt Mann have lost, in
21 years, only 16 dual meets, while
winning over 150 of them. In that
same stretch, in Western Conference
competition, the Maize and Blue mer-
men have taken 15 championships,
five seconds, and one third. In the
NCAA the Wolverines have taken 12
firsts and the rest of the time they
have finished second. Quite a rec-
ord!
*..That in the Olympic games
which have taken place since 1900,
Michigan rnen have taken 13 first
places. One of the better known
track men, Eddie Tolan, not only
won the 100 and 200 meter races,
but also set new records in each one.
The year 1904 seems to have been the
best for the Wolverines. The pole
vault, the 60 meter, 100 teter, and
the 200 teeter races were all taken
by men from Ann Arbor.
. .. .That in the realm of swim-
ming Michigan men hold quite a
few titles. The Wolverines hold
the 50-yard free style, the 100-
yard free style, and the 200-yard
breast stroke marks in Big Ten
competition. In addition to these
Big Ten records, the Michigan
300-yard medley relay team holds
the American record, the NCAA
record, the Big Ten record, and
the Michigan pool record. Harry
Holiday holds three records in the
150-yard backstroke. He has the
best time in the NCAA, the Big
Ten, and the Michigan pool.
. That the most points the
Michigan football team ever scorec
in a game was in the 128-0 wallor
of the University of Buffalo. This
event took place in the season of 1911
which the Wolverine gridders fin-
ished unbeaten, untied, and unscored
upon; The team's final record was
550 points for the season. This is
Michigan's third highest. point total
the only years which are higher be-
ing 1902 and 1903. The all-time higl
is 644 in 1902.

As the third week of the summerI
practice session for Michigan's 1945t
football squad nears its end, the
theme for the Wolverine line candi-
dates has become "speed and still
more speed."
Head Coach Crisler and Line Coach a
"Biggy" Munn are a bit worried over ,
the lack of speed showed by line
prospects. They made it known this
week that slow motion is out as of
now-heat or no heat. Every line
spot is wide open and it's going to be
a tight battle all the way for those
coveted first string berths, Crisler
said, and Munn added that speed
will be the deciding factor in pick-
ing a starting lineup.
Slower Than '44
Candidates for forward wall posts
are bigger than those of last year,
but also considerably slower. The
competition for first team positions
has been so keen and plose that the
coaches have been unable to choose a
starting line from the first twelve
men.
However, two changes have been
made by Munn, these being merely
shifting of men from one position
to another. John Lintol, a letter-
man who shared the center spot with
Harold Watts last season, and who,
earlier in the present practice ses-
sion, volunteered to play the tackle
position, has been moved from the
tackle post to the guard slot. Stan
Kuick, former Flint Northern star
athlete, is now playing tackle in-
stead of end.
Passing, Blocking Stressed
Bob Callahan, discharged service.
veteran and former center for the
* * *
Gridders Lose,
Gain Canidat
Michigan's football squad suffered
its first definite personnel loss of the
season yesterday as the Navy claimed
Don Krueger, 17-year-old end can-
date from Ba xMihgn
Krueger, listed as one of Coach
Bennie Oosterba an's toll prospects.
will report to radar school within a
week, it was .announced.
The news of Krueger's loss was
partially counterbalanced by the an-
nouncement that. John Smith, who'
won a letter at guard for the Univer-
sity of Indiana in 1943, will report
for practice Monday. In addition to
his Indiana laurels, Smith also won
letters in baseball and football at
Indiana State Teachers college.

University of Missouri, is recovering
from a tonsillectomy performed Wed-
nesday. Upon his return to prac-
tice next week, Callahan will be giv-
en a trial at tackle.
Offensive drills still command the
most attention from the coaching
staff with much emphasis placed on
passing. While the line was work-
ing on its blocking assignments, the
backs and ends engaged in passing
drills yesterday. The squad also ran
through the various pass plays. The
final event of the session was a
scrimmag.e in which the White, or
junior varsity squad, played the de-
fensive role.
Outstanding performances on the
Blue team were turned in by half-
backs Henry Fonde, who got off some
speedy end runs, and Pete Elliot,
brother of Chalmers (Bump) Elliot of
Purdue, who distinguished himself in
the passing and running departments.
Summer Cage
T'ryou11ts -To0Be
Pdared Tuesday,
Michigan's summer basketball
drills swung into their third day yes-
terday with Assistant Coach Bill
Barclay announcing that he will;
make his first cut of the squad Tues-
day..,
With only one letterman, forward
Keith Harder, returning, Barclay at-
taches great importance to the sum-
mer drills, because the men who are
out now will form the nucleus of
this year's basketball squad.
One of the many problems facing
Barclay will be the replacing of Don
xindquist,, regular guard on last
year's quintet and captain-elect for
this year's squad, who is leaving the
University at the end of this semes-
ter-
Scrimagaes are still being stressed
at practices, and will be carried on
until Augut, when Coach Barclay
wil start the team's regular defensive
and offensive maneuvers.
Keep A-head of Your Hair"
Bob, our new porter, says, "I'll
giveyou the best shine in Ann
Arbor."
The Dascola Barbers
Between Mich. and State Theatres

Bernie Bierman is back at the
football helm at Minnesota after, a
three-year stretch in the Marine
Corps, and reports from Minneapolis
way indicate that the Old Maestro
may come up with another winner in
his first year back at the Gopher in-
stitution.
Bierman, whose c h i e f delight
seems to be in beating Michigan, has
been working on his squad of 60-odd
aspirants for the past month and is
reportedly well along in molding his
eleven to the famed Minnesota sys-j
tem of offense.
Included on the squad are 16 hold-
over lettermen from last year, and
six more varsity holdovers are slated
to report at the beginning of fallj
workouts. Despite the heavy crop of
experienced talent, however, it is ex-
pected that two or three positions
will be filled by newcomers.
Early workouts have unearthed de-

ficiencies at tackle and end positions,
where only two lettermen have
shown up to fill the four berths. The
rest of the line, and the backfield,
have plenty of talent to go around
with three or four men fighting for
every spot.
In the backfield, Bierman has
Merlin Kispert and Dale Rappana,
both lettermen, at quarterback; Bob
Kasper, Phil McManus and Johnny
Lundquist, also lettermen, at halves;
and letterwinners Vic Kulbitski and
Hockey Mealey at fullback. Wayne
(Red) Williams, another varsity man
from last year, is also expected to be
available for a halfback role.
Minnesota will travel to Ann Ar-
bor, Nov. 3, for a renewal of the fa-
mous "Little Brown Jug" rivalry.
Michigan has won the last two
games between the two schools.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

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Weekdays Open 5 P.M. to 1 A.M.
Sundays 12 to 8:30 P.-M.
JENNINGS RESTAURANT
512 East Williams Telephone 5703

FRI., PULY 20, 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00-News.
7:05-Morning Round-up.
7:15-Sleepy Head Serenade
7:30-Musical Reveille
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55-Musical Interlude.
9:00-News.
9:05-Music Box.
9:30-Community Calendar
9:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15--What Do You Einrw.
10:30-Broadway Melodles.
10 :40-Women Today.
10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Al & Lee Reiser.
11:15-Parson's Grist Mill.
11:30-Farm & Hompe Hour.

11:55-College & Martial 4:00-News.
Airs. 4:05-Wladimir Selinsky.
12:00-News. 4:30-Ranch Boys & Betty
12:15-Jesse Crawford.' Lou.
12:20-Lan! McIntyre. 4:45-Misch Borr & Orch.
12:25-College & Martial 5:00--LNews.
airs. 5:05-Music for Listening.
12:30-Trading Post. 5:10-Hollywood Reporter.
12:45-Luncheon Melodies. 5:15-Mystery Melodies.
1:00--News. 5:30-Rec. Room Rythms.
1:05----Salon Music. 5:45-Sports Review.
1:10-Songs by Southern- 6:00-News.
aires. 6:15-David Rose & Orch.
1:15-Salute To The Hits. 6:30-Telephone Quiz.
1:30-Johnny Messner. 6:45-Flashes From Life.
1:45-D. Lamnour & D. Mc- 6:55-Piano interlude.
Intire. 7:00-News.
1:55-'Today's Hit Tune. 7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
2:00-News. 7:25--Band of the Week.
2:05--Hal Saunders. 7:30-Bill Erkhart,
2:15-Frankie Masters. 7:45-Evening Serenade.
2:00-News, 8:00-News.
2:45-RaysBloch's Orch. 8:05-Dance Time.
3:00-News. 8.15-Put & Take It.
3:05-Arthur Chapman. 8:30-String Trio.
3:15-John Kirby. 8:45-Pan Americana.
3:30-Band Music. 9:00-News,
3:45-Lawrence Quintet. 9:05-Jerry Sears.

; - i

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i

Major League Standings

I4

AMERICAN LEAGUE

TEAMS
Detroit ........
New York. -...-.
Boston....
Washington
Chicago ,...... .
St. Louis,...... .
Cleveland,.
Philadelp hia,

W L
...46 32
41 36
-..42 38
.40 36
41 40
,..37 38
..37 39
,M 51

Pct.
.590
.532
.525
.526
.506
.493
.497
.338

GB
4
5
5
61
71/2
8
19A

TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Washington, twi-
night.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, twi-
night.
St. Louis at New York (2).
Chicago at Boston.

I

1

' ~r
Y
. i:. bessp'yyM.t. :v: J:f 'f
{ 6:

I BE

C

QL

I

NA'
Chicago
St. Louis
Brooklyn
New York
Pittsburgh
Boston ...
Cincinnati
Philadelnh
TC

rIONAL LEAGUE
..... ...50 31 .617
........47 35 .573
...47 37 .560
....45 41 .523
.......41 41 .500
.....39 41 .488
37 39 .487
ma .......23 64 .264
ODAY'S GAMES

31,
41/2
71/2
91,
101/2
101/2
30

If"

SPORT
Short Sleeves . .

$1.60 to $4.50

Brooklyn at Chicago.
New York at Pittsburgh.
Boston at Cincinnati.

FOR SUMMER SPORT WEAR - SMART, LIGHT-
WEIGHT SHETLAND AND PLAID SPORT COATS.
DESIGNED FOR COMFORT, THESE CASUAL COATS
MAKE JDEAL SCHOOL WEAR.

Long Sleeves ... $3.50 to $10.00
PLAIDS and PLAINS

All Wool
Tropicol Worsted
SUITS
$2750
r ,. _ AI

I ve- tv ,. ,

I I

II f~ ~7A ~I

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