100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 08, 1945 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-SUNDAY, JULY 8, '1945

THE MICHIGAN~ DAILY

PAGE FYVF

a

PAGE

SUN FUN, EH KEED?

Weather Man Schedules
Sun Eclipse Tomorrow

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)

When the alarm clock goes off bra-
zenly tomorrow morning, and you
look out the window with one eye
shut and. notice it's still fairly dark
heave a sigh of relief and turn over,
again.
The "ole faithful" clock did not
go on the blink, neither did your
eyesight. The morning dim-out
comes from a partial eclipse which
will cut off 7-10 of the diameter
of the sun.
But then, you won't be the only
All men interested in working on
the Union staff may register between
3 and 5 p. m. EWT (2 and 4 p. m.
CWT) beginning tomorrow through
Friday in the Student Office at the
Union.
Staff men begin work assisting the
committee chairman who direct
Union activities. Committee staffs
are reorganized at the beginning of
each semester, and the first organ-
izational meeting will be held at
7:30 p. m. EWT (6:30 p. m. CWT)
Tuesday.
* * *
First mixer of the summer term
will be held from 2:30 to 5 p. m. EWT
0:30 to 4 p. m. CWT) Saturday in
the Union ballroom.
Summer hours for the billiard
room are from noon to 9 p. m. EWT
(11 a. m. to 8 p. m. CWT). The
room is closed on Sundays.
A collection of pictures of Uni-
versity All-Americans since 1906 is
hung on the center pillars of the
room.
The swimming pool will be open
during the summer from 11 a. m. to
8 p. m. EWT (10 a. m. to 7 p. m.
CWT) daily except Saturday and
Sunday.
Union staff banquet will be held
at 12:30 p. m. EWT (11:30 a. m.
CWT) in the Henry P. Anderson room
of the Union.

,ne fooled. This affair isn't coming
merely to bother Ann Arborites, but
.s making a good, long trip. Begin-
.ing near Boise, Idaho, the path
Af totality will move northeast-
vard across Montana, swing through
Canada, the Hudson Bay region,
zcross the North Atlantic ocean,
Nforway, Sweden, Finland, Russia into
3iberia and will end at sunset in
Purkestan, not quite reaching Sink-
anthe most westerly province of
"L una-.
Outside of this so-called blackout
path, a partial eclipse may be seen
n nearly all of North America, all of
Europe, a large area of northwest
Asia and a portion of northwest
Africa as far as Ethiopia.
In Ann Arbor, the moon will
touch the sun at 7:07 a. m. EWT
(6:07 a. m. CWT)-specially for
those who rise for eight o'clocks-
reach its mid-point at 8:03 a. m.
EWT and pass over at 9:04 a. m.
EWT. At Detroit, the circumstan-
ces will be very similar to those in
Ann Arbor.
And it can happen again, only not
until 1954 and by that time you will
be University alumni.
y. ).
Use Colored Glass
To Observe Eclipse
DETROIT, July 7-UP)-From what
the weather man said today the
eclipse of the sun Monday morning
will be-"a show everybody can see.
The weather bureau predicted
"clear weather" for the extraordinary
celestial performance. A haze might
be the only flaw, if any.
Starting at 7:07 a. m. (Eastern
War Time), the moon will intrude be-
tween the sun and earth. By meteor-
ologists' calculations, the eclipse will
last two hours exactly.
At 8:03 a. m. will come the "maxi-
mum phase," when seven-tenths of
the sun will be obscured.
Observers were advised by F. H.
Pearson, weather bureau meteorolo-
gist, to use smoked or colored glasses
for best results.

ative, (3) The Director of Physical
Education and Athletics. hs
Petitions for exemption by stu-
dents in this College should be ad-
dressed by freshmen and sophomores
to Professor Arthur Van Duren,
Chairman of the Academic Counsel-
ors (108 Mason Hall); by all other
students to Associate Dean E. A.
Walter (1220 Angell Hall.)
Except under very extraordinary
circumstances no petitions will be
considered after the end of the third
week of the Summer Term.
The Administrative Board of
the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts.
Students Enrolled in Education
Courses are invited to meet in the
University General Library, Room
110 for a special tour of the Library
at 4:20 EWT on Tuesday and Wed-
nesday, July 10 and 11.
The following seminars will be con-
ducted in the Mathematics Depart-
ment during the Summer Session:
Transfinite Numbers, Professor
Dushnik, Tuesday at 3:00.
Geometry, Professor Rainich, Tues-
day at 4:15.
Statistics, Professor Craig, Wed-
nesday from 3 to 5.
Topological Aspects of Function
Theory, Profesor Rothe, Thursday at
3:00.
Topology, Professor Wilder, Thurs-
day at 4:00.
Each of the seminars will meet in
Room 3201 Angell Hall. The hours
given in each case are according to
Eastern War Time.
Social Dance Class: The Social
Dance Class originally scheduled to
meet on Thursdays at 6:30 CWT
(7:30 EWT) in Barbour Gymnasium
will meet regularly on Wednesdays at
7:30 CWT (8:30 EWT) at the Wom-
en's Athletic Building.
Dept. of Phys. Educ. for Women
Linguistic Institute. Introduction
to Linguistic Science. "Methods of
Analysis of Living Language." Dr. C.
F. Voegelin and Prof. W. F. Twaddell.
6 p.m. CWT (7 p.m. EWT), Tuesday,
July 10 and Thursday, July 12, Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Women students wishing part-time
employment while at the University
may register at the Office of the
Dean of Women. All students who
are now employed or who accept em-
ployment during the term are re-
quired to register at that office.
Graduate Students in Speech: The
exploratory examinations for stu-
dents in the Department of Speech
Flint Children,
Go to Louisville
To Be Married
LOUISVILLE, KY., July 7-(FP)-
A Travelers' Aid worker found in the
bus station here.today four 15-year-
old children who told her they had
come from Flint, Mich., to be mar-
ried.
The two boys and two girls said
they were high school sophomores
and had come to Louisville because
a soldier they met in Ohio told them
Kentucky was a "gopd place to get
married."
They were taken to the Children's
Center here when they told the Trav-
elers' Aid interviewer they had been
sleeping on church steps and in wait-
ing rooms. They had been traveling
with money from the sale of two war
bonds, the interviewer said.
They went to Detroit and Toledo
and were headed south to Florida
to visit the mother of one of the
boys. The Travelers' Aid Society no-
tified the children's parents.

Negro Is Appointed
To Naval Academy
WASHINGTON, July 7 -fP)- The
first Negro appointed to the Naval
Academy at Annapolis, Md., since
1937 reported to the institution June
30, the Navy said today.
Five Negroes have been appointed
to the Academy in its history. There,
have been no Negro graduates.

who are applicants for advanced de-
grees will be given at 4 p.m. Monday
(EWT) in room 4211 Angell Hall. Al'
students who have not taken th
examinations previously will be re-
quired to do so at this time.
Conets
Chamber Music Program: The Al-
beneri Trio will present a program
of compositions for violin, cello, and
piano, at 7:30 p. in., CWT, Thurs-
lay, July 12, in Hill Auditorium. The
group includes Alexander Schneider.
Benar Heifetz, and Erich Itor Kahn,
and will appear in Ann Arbor under
the auspices of the Elizabeth Sprague
Coolidge Foundation in the Library
of Congress.
The program will be open to the
general public, withbthe exception
of small children.
The First School of Music faculty
concert will be heard in Hill Audito-
rium, Thursday, July 12 instead of
Tuesday, July 10, as previously an-
nouneed.
Exhibitions
General Library, main corridor
cases. Books printed in English be-
fore 1640.
Clements Library. Japan in Maps
from Columbus to Perry (1492-1854).

JAP PRISONERS LINE UP ON OKINAWA. T/SGT. William S. Green, of Hinsdale, Ill., checks a group
of Japanese prisoners during one of the twice-daily roll calls at a prisoner of war camp on Okinawa.
FOUR LECTURES WILL BE GiVEN-:
Pike To Show Linguistic Methods

Architecture Building.
work,

Studentl

Four public lectures are announc-
ed by the Linguistic Institute for the
second week of its 1945 session.
Dr. Kenneth L. Pike, lecturer in
linguistics in the Institute, will speak
at the Wednesday evening special
lecture, at 7:30 p.m. EWT (6:30 p.m.
CWT) in the Rackham Amphithea-
tre. Dr. Pike will demonstrate the
methods used by a field linguist in
beginning to learn a new language.
from a native speaker when he lacks
even an interpreter capable of say-
ing "I want to learn your language."
To Meet For First Time
Dr. Pike, who has done extensive
work in the recording and analysis
p-

There's Unemployment in Detroit Again

DETROIT, July 7-(I'P)--Edward L.
Cushman, State Director of the War
Manpower Commission, estimated to-
day that approximately 40,000 per-
sons in Detroit now are actively seek-
ing jobs.
In March, 1940, Cushman said,

there was an unemployment load
of 135,000.
He said that approximately 50,000
persons visited the United States
Employment Service offices here in
June. At the end of the month,
Cushman added 14,575 jobopenings
were listed at the local USES offices.

Michigan Historical Collections, 160
Rackham Building. Representative
items in the Michigan Historical Col-
lections.
Museums Building, rotunda. Some
foods of the American Indian.
Events ┬žIoday
Carillon Recital. Professor Percival
Price, Univerity Carillonneur, 3:15
p.m. (CWT) or 4:15 p.m. (EWT).
The Congregational - Disciples
Guild will meet at the First Congre-
gational Church, State and William,
at 4:30 p.m. (EWT) to go in a group
to Riverside Park for recreation, a
picnic supper, and a closing Vesper
Service led by Johanne McMillin. In
case of rain the meeting will be held
in the First Congregational Church.
Coining Events
Russky Kruzhok (Russian Circle)
will hold the first of its weekly meet-
ings for the summer session at 7:00
p.m. CWT (8:00 p.m. EWT) Monday,
July 9, at the International Center.
The program will include election of
officers, group singing, and tea. All
interested are cordially invited.
University Lecture. Tuesday, July
17. Professor Preston W. Slosson,
"Interpreting the News." 3:10 p.m.
(CWTf) or 4:10 p.m. (EWT.
Play: "The Male Animal," Thur-
ber and Nugent. July 18 to July 21.
Conference on the United States
in the Postwar World. July 23 to
August 3. Special bulletin available
in the Summer Session Office, Room
1213 Angell Hall. Distinguished vis-
iting lecturers.
Motion Picture. Russian film,
"Beethoven Concerto" with out-
standing child stars. 7:30 p.m.
(CWT) or 8:30 p.m. (EWT). Rack-
ham Lecture Hall both Friday and
Saturday, July 13 and 14. Auspices,
Department of Russian.

MAGAZINE
Special
Student Rate
2.67 for8Months

i.

of American Indian languages, will
meet the native speaker for the first
time when he steps before the audi-
ence; and, after a half hour- inter-
view conducted by methods actually
used in field research, will tell the
audience what he has been able to
learn in that amount of time.
In order to create as close an ap-
proximation as possible to field con-
ditions, Dr. Pike will not be told the
name of the language his informant
speaks, and the informant will not
be told the purpose for which he has
been brought to the lecture.
At the weekly luncheon conference
at 1 p.m. EWT (noon CWT) Thurs-
day, in the ABC room of the League,
Prof. Robert T. Ittner, chairman of

the German department and admin-
istrative assistant to the president at
Indiana University, will speak on
"Testing Achievement with Various
Language Teaching Methods." The
conference will be preceded by lunch-
eon in the League dining room at 12
noon EWT (11 a.m. CWT).
The Institute's regular Tuesday
and Thursday evening lecture series
will have as the topic for both meet-
ings this week "Methods of Analysis
of Living Language." The speakers
will be Dr. C. F. Voegelin and Dr. W.
F. Twaddell, both of whom are mem-
bers of the Institute's staff. The lec-
tures will be held at 7 p.m. EWT (6
p.m. CWT) in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.

I

I

SUIT#MEHTIME LIFTS

by
Your round-the-clock concentra
cologne . . . perfect fragrance
augment your Hartnell perfume
a scent that will thrill him ...
2.75 to 8.50
Plus 20% Federal tax

!r
BE FIRM ABOUT YOUR
BUST-LINE!
Of great importance - in your buster
life -. is a well-cut Hoillywood Max-
well bra that brings comfortable sup-
port, with beautiful bosom contours.
2.50 to 3.25
FIT AS A FIDDLE!
that will be you in your new perfect-
fit, noul-riding Yolande slip. They are
Lovliens in Lingerie, white, tea-rose,
bluie.

Exclusively

FOLLETT'S
322 South State

at

I

BOBETTE

, "-

r
;
,_
/ .

to buy a permanent that will last,
that will look natural, and that
will keep your hair curly even on
the beach. The operators at Groom-
well's can give you a permanent
of this sort, and in the latest style.

IT'S WORTH
YOUIR MONEY ..

!III

ited
and

4.95 6.95 9.95

0oomwe
1205 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

O~eaujI

HONE 4818
= = =

FEATURED IN HARPER'S BAZAAR
SEVENTEEN AND PHOTOPLAY
Pert little open bacitalf-Ironnet of
soft black velvet witA a wIlsp of
flattering veil. Pe'fect to pick up
your suiiner vardrobe and wear'
d ating into te fall. Price 850
O.P.A. ODD LOT RELEASE
Ration-Free from July 9 to 28
Sohoes, 4.93
mostly pumps . . . spectators, semi-tailoreds,
a few dressy styles. All over calfskins, gabar-
dine and calf combinations. Browns and
navy blue.

P

IIi - -

I.

i

I

lHave Youlad YVour'Copy of:

UP FRONT - Bill Mauldin . . . ............. .
PROCEED WITHONT DELAY-Sgt. Thomas St. George.
DESERT DECAMERON - H. Allen Smith ...........
PUBLIC JOURNAL-Max Lerner ...... . ... .
JAP MILITARISM, ITS CAUSE AND CURE -John Maki
AMERICA: PARTNER IN WORLD RULE-William H. Chamberlain
THE FOLDED LEAF-William Maxwell ........ .
DRAGON HARVEST-- Upton Sinclair .......... .
THE HAPPY TIME -Robert Fontaine.. . ........ .
ARTIE GREENGROIN- Harrv Brown.

3.00
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
2.50
3.00
2.50
2.50

j) ~~{

.~-~-~,\xEl - I

iI

25 l

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan