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August 23, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-23

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a

SrORTS

NEWS + VIEWS + COMMENT
[y HILL MULLENDORE, Sports Editor
THE PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES have finally come to life for their new
manager, Ben Chapman, and have compiled a five-game winning streak.
All of which proves the validity of that old, and somewhat moth-eaten,
adage, "If at first you don't succeed, etc., etc." . . . The Phils, incidentally,
have come up with the best relief pitcher in the majors in the person of
young Anton Karl. Karl's wide assortment. of tricky slow stuff is prac-
tically unhittable for a few innings, but a shoulder injury prevents his
going the route.
If Detroit's Hal Newhouser manages to win 25 bal games this year
on the mound (he notched number 20 the other day), he will become the
first American Leaguer since the days of Robert Moses (Lefty) Grove
to turn the eiviable trick in two successive seasns . . . Newhouser won
29 last year, while losing nine . .. This season, he has 20 and seven so
far . . .Dave Ferriss still leads the loop in percentage with 19 and six.
Rumor has it that Newhouser and Bob Feller will hoo up in a night
game Friday at Cleveland, as the Indian ace makes his comeback debut
after being discharged from the Navy . .. Should be quite a trissle, un-
less one manager or the other decides to withhold his star . .. Feller,
incidentally, hung up his record of 18 strikeouts against the Tigers, but
lost the game, 4-3.
BARRING THE UNFORESEEN, Hank Greenberg will lead the American
League in the batting average column come the end of the season ...
But the mark won't be official, as Hank won't get to bat 400 times . . . Dick
Wakefield, the former University of Michigan star, did the same thing
last year ... He hit .355, but Lou Boudreau's .325 took official honors . . All
of which makes us wonder just a little at the criteria for determining bat-
ting leaders.
Who was the best hitter of all time? A lot of old-timers stick up
for Hugh Duffy, of the old Baltimore Orioles, who holds the record with
an average of .438... Other candidates for the laurel: Ty Cobb, George
Sisler, Rogers Hornsby, Ed Delahanty, Babe Ruth, Harry Heilmann, Ted
Williams .. . And you can write your own choices from there.
Brooklyn Dodgers who hit home runs are awarded a carton of cigarettes
for every home run hit, by a tobacco firm sponsoring Dodger broadcasts.
. . Tommy (Shotgun) Brown, the seventeen-year-old second base wonder,
clouted his first the other day, but didn't get the smokes . . . Manager Leo
Durocher confiscated the weeds, claiming Brown was to young to smoke.
. Brown supposedly has the strongest throwing arm in baseball, but
his accuracy is not all it could be . . . Fans who sit behind first base at Eb-
bets Field when Brown is on the premises are in danger of their lives from
Brown's bullet-like heaves.
PEM Highlights .
Postwar Plan Unchanged Athletic Official Returns
End of the war will, in all proba- Howard C. Leibee, assistant super-
bility, have no immediate effect on visor of the department of education
the University's physical education and athletics, has just returned to
program, according to Coach Ches- Ann Arbor after teaching at the Uni-
ter Stackhouse, who has been in versity of Alberta in Edmonton,
charge of the PEM program for -the Canada, for the last six weeks.
first eight weeks of the semester. Leibee was invited to attend the
"Stackhouse also said that the pro- University of Alberta and teach as a
gram would probably run for the member of the faculty for education.
-next school year, but that after that, He taught courses in physical educa-
there are no definite plans. Final tion to athletics instructors of Can-
word on the post-war future of PEM ada's intermediate institutions and
would have to come from Athletic high schools.
Director H. O. (Fritz) Crisler, who is During the last eight weeks he will
out of town on his vacation. teach PEM.
AN LE-FASH IONED SHiOES
FOR MEN

rout os As
As Tigers Keep
American Lead
Greenberg Homers,
Doubles in 4-1 Victory
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, Aug. 22--The Detroit
Tigers made it five out of seven over
the Philadelphia Athletics today as
Paul (Dizzy) Trout stopped the
American League tail-enders, - 4-1,
with a seven-hit pitching chore.
The victory, Trout's fourth
straight, was his 13th of the season
and came at the expense of 19-year-
old rookie righthander Bill Connelly
of Alberta, Va., who yielded three
runs in the first inning of his debut
in organized baseball and promptly
retired for a pinch-hitter.
A pair of walks, preceding Hank
Greenberg's double and Rudy York's
triple, helped Detroit to its three-
run cluster and Greenberg provided
the last Tiger run with his seventh
homer, a terific clout into the upper
left field seats in the eighth inning.
Luther Kneer, who relieved Con-
nelly in the second, gave the Tigers
only four hits the rest of the way.
Trout pitched his way over three
rough spots enroute to his second win
over the A's in the current series.
Ernie Kish's double and a pair of
walks filled the bases for the Macks
in the first inning and Buddy Rosar
drove in the only Philadelphia run
with a single to right. Mayo Smith,
trying to score from second on the
hit, was thrown out at the plate by
Roy Cullenbine to end the inning.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

DIZZY TROUT..
His own V-Day smile.

1
By Herbert,, Ruskin
. . . That the biggest score that
Michigan ever ran up against a Big
Ten opponent did not come, as many
would suppose, against Chicago, but
in a game with Iowa. It was in 1902
that the Wolverines racked up a total
of 107 points to hapless Iowa's none.
The Michigan eleven finished the
1C02 season with a record of 11 vic-
tories and no defeats or ties. The
total number of points for the men
in Maize and Blue was 644. The op-
position scored only 12.
. . . That in 1932, the Univer-
sity baseball team took a tour of
Japan, playing 15 games with the
men of Nippon. The Wolverines
took 10 of the games, while losing !
the other five. Michigan took at
least one game from each team
that it played.
. . That Michigan track squads
won their first meet from each of
their Big Ten opponents. The first
Ohio State-Michigan meet score
found Michigan with 104 1/3 to
OSU's 57 2/3. This is only four
points lower than the Michigan high
which was scored against the Univer-
sity of Chicago.
. . . Michigan holds an impres-
sive record over Michigan State
College when it comes to hockey.
The Wolverines have won 12 of
the 13 games played. Their only
loss came in the 197 season, when
the Spartans eked out a 2-1 deci-
sion over the Michigan sextet.
. . . That Beloit did not seem to
have much luck either in scoring
against or holding back Michigan
football sqtiads. It has been held
scoreless in the three games played
while the Wolverines have scored a
total of 190 points, averaging better
than a point-a-minute.

Illness Strikes
Three Michigan
Athletic Figure
e es
Illness has struck at three promi-
nent Michigan athleic figures with-
in the last two weeks, but all are well
on the road to recovery.
Fielding H. Yost, former Michigan,
football coach and athletic director,
suffered a gall attack last Wednes-
day and underwent treatment at
University Hospital for four days.
A former trainer of Michigan
teams, Dr. George S. May, who served
under Yost, has been a patient at
University Hospital since Aug. 11.
The last of the trio to have been
overcome by illness is Ray Fisher,
baseball coach who celebrated his
25th anniversary at Michigan this
year. Fisher underwent a hernia
operation two weeks ago.

k

91

TEAMS W L Pet.
Detroit..........67 48 .583 .
Washington.......67 49 .578
Chicago...........60 55 .522
St. Louis .........58 54 .518
New York ........56 55 .505
Cleveland.........58 57 .504
Boston ...........54 62 .466 1
Philadelphia ......36 76 .321 2
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Philadelphia 1, Detroit 4.
New York 5, Chicago 6.

GB
'/r
7
712
9
9
13lI4
291/

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Washington 3-6, Cleveland 0-5.
NATIQNAL LEAGUE

TEAMS
Chicago ....
St. Louis ...
Brooklyn ...
New York ..
Pittsburgh
Boston.
Cincinnati

W
74
70
63
64
... 62
54
45

L
40
47
52
54
58
66
69
81

Pet.
.649
.598
.548
.542
.517
.450
.395
.302

GB
42
11
15
23
29
40

ROOM AND BOARD
I ______-.__________ ______ _ _ _ .
MEALS SERVED: BREAKFASTS
AND DINNERS AT CHI OMEGA
SORORITY. 1503 WASHTENAW,
FOR LAST EIGHT WEEKS OF
SUMMER. RESERVATIONS AC-
CEPTED NOW WITH DOWN
PAYMENT.
BOARDERS WANTED last eight
weeks. Good food, reasonable
prices. Call Fritz Bade, Phi Delta
Theta, 2-4551.
FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR RENT: 420 S. Division,
front suite for 2 men students.
Also single.
FOR RENT: Singles and suites for

LOST: One small black Chicago Li-
brary book about Confucius. Mail
to Chicago Library, Chicago, Illi-
nois. Reward.
LOST: One maroon Eversharp foun-
tain pen between Stockwell and
Student Publications Building. If
found call 2-4471, room 4056.
LOST : Eversharp pen and pencil in
red leather case in rear of woman's
League. Reward. Call 8994 or 26064.
LOST: Black prayer book with Mas-
sachusetts license on fly leaf. Con-
tact Freedman, 319 E. Williams.

Philadelphia......35

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled.

1 i

Twi-Night Twin Bill

i

-1 i

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Boston .........000 002 000-2 8 2
St. Louis.......200 000 20x-4 5 0
Woods. F. Barrett (8) and Steiner;
Muncrief and Mancuso.
Boston ........010 200 200-5 10 1
St. Louis ......100 000 012-4 9 4
Ryba, Ferriss (9) and Holm; West,,
Zoldak (4), Jakucki (8) and Schultz.

ten girls for last eight weeks sum-
mer session. Half block from cam-
pus. Mrs. Wood, 725 Haven. Phone
5938.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Phi Kappa Phi key. Initials
M. J. K. on reverse. Please return
to Dental School or call 8260.

G ERSHWIN ... o Pecpa

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

THURS., AUG. 23, 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00-News.
7:05-Morning Round-up.
7:15-Sleepy Head Serenade
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.?
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55-Musical Interlude.
9:00-News.
9:05-Music Box.
9:30-Little Show.
9.:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-Bea Potter
10:15-What Do You Know.
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.

10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Carmen Cavallero
11:15-,Three-Quarter Time
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Merle Pitt.
12:25-College & Martial
Airs.
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Community Calendar
1:15-Burl Ives.
1:30-Johnny Long.
1:45-Marie GreeneI
1:55-Today's Hit Tune
2:00-News.
2:05-Bob Halsey.
2:15-U. of M.

2:45--Baseball Brevities.
2:55-Baseball (Phila. at
Detroit)
5:00-News.
5:05-Music for Listening.
5:10-Hollywood Reporter.
5:15-Mystery Melodies.
5:30-Rec. Room Records
5:45-Sports Revue.
6:00-News.
6:15-Harry Horlick.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Flashes From Life.
6:55-Piano Interlude.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Popular Music.
7:30-A. A. Civic Program.
7:45-Virginia Kidwell.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.
8:15-Put & Take It.

! _. _.._ _w _ --
- - e I

ENSIAN
SUBSCRIBERS... i
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weeks and will not be back in the fall, please
leave your address at the Student Publications

TRY NUNN BUSH SHOES
They fit the ankle
They it the heel
$10.00 to $11.00
Sold.Only at

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