100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 17, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 17, 1945

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

PAGE THREE

Sporting

World

Compiles

Outstanding

Record

in

Wartime

By BILL MULLENDORE
Daily Sports Editor
Now that the war has finally been brought to a conclusion and can be viewed
increasingly in retrospect, the world of sport can review a record that stacks up as
pretty good on the whole, even though from the beginning it was apparent that
athletics, both professional and amateur, had, at best, but a passive role to play in
the conflict.
One notes a tendency on the part of some writers to over-estimate the importance
of that role, to dramatize it into something it very definitely wasn't. It is fairly certain,
for example, that, contrary to what some persons would have us think, the men
overseas thought of other things than the delights of Ebbets Field and the right to boo
the umpire. It would be a sad commentary on the young men of the nation if, in the
time of the world's greatest crisis, they worried only whether Notre Dame would go
through its football schedule undefeated.
As a matter of fact, there is no real need to overemphasize the contribution of
sport,indirect though it necessarily was, to the war effort. The record, as it stands
and will continue to stand, is good enough. While individual instances of a more
or less unsavory character can be located here and there, the over-all picture is one
to inspire public confidence, not contempt, for athletics as a mature American institu-
tion capable of handling itself with decision and firmness in a time of national crisis.
We are not thinking so much of the fact that a great many of our professional and

amateur athletes saw service in the Armed Forces and that not a few of them gave
their lives in the process. After all, despite the sometimes almost supernatural aura
with which we often enshroud our heroes of the playing field, such men are, in reality,
only ordinary individuals equipped with special physical talents. Essentially, they
differ not in the slightest from the millions of other men in other walks of life who
also found themselves involved in the terrible b?., ness of making war. Yes, sport
has its war heroes, but so does every other phase of that complex thing we call
American civilization.
Sport, however, did accomplish some things that only sport could accomplish,
and, for the most part, accomplished them very well. And in doing that, and that
alone, sport proved to the world its right to a place of some prominence in the
American way of life, not only in peace but also in war.
At the outset of hostilities, those in command of the destinies of the nations
clearly defined the role of athletics. Severe drains were to be made on its manpower.
Numerous difficulties were to be placed in its way as part of the unavoidable dis-
comforts of a total war effort. But, despite the handicaps, sport was told to continue,
in fact to increase its normal peacetime function as a source of entertainment for
LIhe American people. For it was recognized that even in time of war the public;
benefits by occasional relaxation from the increased tempo of living concomitant
;with waging war. This function, too, runs the danger of over-emphasis, but its
existence is beyond doubt.

Sports fulfilled that function and did it in such a way as to exact high tribute
from the nation. The handicaps were great. At times they seemed almost over-
powering. Horse racing was forced to discontinue its activities entirely for a time.
Some colleges and universities had to curtail their athletic programs. Almost all
fields were at one time or another faced with the necessity of eliminating parts of
their services. But in the main, they carried on, and in carrying on performed as a
credit to the vision, industry, and common sense that characterize those at the head
of our many fields of athletic endeavor.
In the actual theatres of operations, sport also had its place to fill. That it filled
it adequately is attested by the myriad baseball diamonds, football fields, basketball
courts, and other arenas to be found on the plains of France, the fields of Germany,
and the islands of the Pacific. Battle-wearied men relaxed with the equipment sent
}to them from the United States, and helped to regain their sense of proportional
values at the same time. The world of sport can be proud of that, too.
One may mention other contributions-the tours by important figures, the many
contests played for war relief, the use of competitive athletics in the training of men to
fight. But what stands out above all else is the spirit of carrying on, of keeping one
foot solidly on the ground, of striving to retain an appearance of normalcy in an
abnormal world crying for something of the old to cling to. Of that spirit, and of its
many manifestations, the world of sport can be justly proud as it looks to the future
and greater things to come.

I

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

HOT TIME IN PASADENA:
'01 Gridders Won Michigan's
Only Rose Bowl Appearance

TEAM
Chicago.......
St. Louis.....
Brooklyn......
*New York.
*Pittsburgh.
Boston.........
Cincinnati ....
Philadelphia ....

.
....
...;fi
....G
....5
....5
....
....3
....3

W L
70 38
67 45
62 47,
59 52
59 54
52 63
35 64
30 81

Pet. GB
.648
.598 5
.569 8'l
.532 121/
.522 1312
.452 21a2
.413 30%/2
.270 41%

THURSDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 2, Chicago 1.
St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 2.
Cincinnati 5-8, Boston 3-3.
New York 2, Pittsburgh 1.
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Brooklyn.
Pittsburgh at New York.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, night.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

By SY LICHTER
New Years day, 1902, saw the first
and only Michigan football team com-
pete in the Rose Bowl game.
Under the coaching of Fielding H.
Yost, the Wolverines ran wild over
the Stanford Indians to the tune of
49-0, at the Rose Bowl Stadium in
Pasadena, California.
Heat Has No Effect
Although the game was played in
typical California weather, the Yost
mend did not find the sudden change
in climate a nemisis to their superior,
playing form. As the Los Angeles
Times put it, after the game had
been played, "Enormous crowd sees
Michigan Back-breakers make
monkeys out of Stanford footballers."
The captain of the Stanford team,
wishing to alleviate the humiliation
his team was suffering, asked cap-
tain White of the Wolverines to dis-
continue the game after five minutes
of the last quarter had been played.,
No 'M' Substitutes
Stanford played six substitutes,

while Michigan played the whole
game with its original starting eleven.
The Wolverines rushed the ball 503
yards, kicked 881 yards, ran back
kicks 127 yards, made' twelve first
downs, and was penalized only once.
The eleven Michigan men who
played the entire game were Redden,
left end; White, left tackle; McGugin,
left guard; Gregory, center; Wilson,
right guard; Shorts, right tackle;
Sweely, right end; Weeks, quart-
erback; Herrnstein, right half; Hes-
ton, left half; and Snow, fullback.
The return of the team to Ann Ar-
bor was the occasion of one of the
biggest demonstrations that have
ever occurred in this town. When
the team arrived at the station, "M"
men were carried on the shoulders of
crowd, as the rooters sang "Oh, How
He Ran," mixed in with famous loco-
motive yell. Up State Street the
procession went, to the accompani-
ment of red fire, Roman candles, and
rockets, a Fourth of July celebration
in January.

DID YOU KNOW?
By HERBERT RUSKIN
That the University of Michi- Wesleyan in 1897. Nebraska fol-
gan football team has played against lowed in 1898; Kansas in 1869;
88 different teams and has a record Stanford in 1900 and then he came
88 d69irentteamlsseanda reod to Michigan in 1901. The first five
o~ 369 wins, 105 losses and 21 ties. teams he coached played a total of
Against schools which are now mem- 57 games winning 55, tying 1 and
bers of the Western Conference, Wol- losing the last game. This loss
verine grid squads have won 139 con- happened to be in the last game
tests, losing 58 and tieing only eight. of the 1905 season, when Chicago
Of the 88 teams played, 63 of them wone2-0 s
have never beaten the Maize and won, 2-0.
Blue on the gridiron. . . . That during the four years
that Willie Heston played football for
. That Fielding Yost played Michigan he played in 44 games,
football at the University of West scoring the incredible total of 110
Virginia and at Lafayette. The touchdowns and average of two and
first team he coached was Ohio one-half per game.
AO
AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

TEAM
Detroit .,... .
Washington
*Chicago ....,
*Cleveland.
*New York.
*St. Louis ..

W
62
......59
,.....56
54
52
52

L
44
48
50
51
50
52

Pct.
.585
.551
.528
.514
.510
.500

GB
3'
6
7%
8
9

*Boston... ... ..51 57' .472 12 .
*Philadelphia ...... 34 68 .333 26
*Does not include night games.
THURSDAY'S RESULTS
-Detroit 9, Washington 2.
Cleveland 7, Philadelphia 0.
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Washington at Detroit.
Boston at Chicago.
New York at St. Louis, night.
Philadelphia at Cleveland.
Continuous COOL
from 1 P.M.
- Tn
-- Today and Saturday --

CL ASSIFIED ADVERTISING

FRI., AUG. 17, 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00-News.
7:05-Morning Round-up.
7:15-Sleepy Head Serenade
7:30-Musical Reveille
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.'
8:55-Musical Interlude.
9:00-News.
9:05-Music Box.
9:30-Little Show.
9:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15--What Do You Know.
10:30--Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.
10:45--Waltz Time.
11 :00-News.
11:05-Al & Lee Reiser.
11:15-Hollywood Melodies.

11 30--Farm & Home Hour.
11:55--College & Martial
Airs.
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:;,3-Today's Band.
12:30-Veterans Counselor.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1 :00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Community Calendar.
1:15-Salute To The Hits.
1:30-Johnny Messner.
1:45--Dinah Shore.
1:55-Today's Hit Tune.
2:00-News.
2:05-Hal Stuart.
.2:15-Frankie Masters,
2:00--News.
2:05-Hal Saunders.
2:15--Lawrence Welk.
11:15--Listen Ladies.
12:30--Veterans Counselor.
2 :45--Baeba Brevities.
2:55--Baseball (Washat
Detroit) .

5:00--News.
5:05-Music for Listening.
5:10-Hollywood Reporter.
5:15--Mystery Melodies.
5:30--Rec. Room Rythms.
5:45-Sports Review.
6:00-News.
6:15-David Rose & Orch.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Flashes From Life.
6:55-Piano Interlude.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Band of the Week.
7:25--Popular Music.
7:30-Bill Urquhart
7:45--Evening Serenade.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.
8:15--Put & Take It.
8:30--String Trio.
8:45--Ray Bloch's Swing
Fourteen.
9:00--News.
9:05--Jerry Sears.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Fraternity ring,. identification
bracelet at Palmer Field Tuesday
evening. Call Daily, box 2.}
LOST: One Physiology lab manual,j
between New Granada and East
Med. Bldg. Call 4493.
LOST: August 10, gold Bulova watch
in or between Rackham and Stock-
well. Reward. Call 24471. Jose-
phine Fernandez.
LOST: Brown wallet near library or
Angell Hall. Contains identifica-
tion card. Call Peggy Casto, 22755.

LOST: One Alpha Delt fraternity
pin Thursday afternoon, August 9
in vicinity of campus. Reward, call
21561.
PERSONALS
A YOUNG NAVAL OFFICER on
leave, training for State Depart-
ment examinations, would like to
exchange a couple of hours tutoring
a day in French for three weeks
vacation at a beautiful northern
Michigan summer home for tutor
and wife. Leave Ann Arbor August
16 or 17, return September 6. Phone
Ann Arbor 2-4180 between 8:00 and
9:00 p. m. Lieut. Wells.

il

I

a

..........

JIVE BUSTERS
CARTOON -NEWS
HI HO RODEO
Coming Sunday
ROSALIND RUSSELL
"ROUGHLY SPEAKING"
e, ec-An m modern
NOW SHOWING

I

Any way you look at it-
the casually tailored classic
is a scene stealer - on cam-
pus - going to business -
or just running about.
Of Rayon Gabardine or
lightweight wool - one- and
two-piece styles - clever
little dresses all- wonderful
colors. Sizes 9-15 and 10-20.
Priced $8.95 - $22.95

Py,

l
.:.. r.
} 1 \ SD J
!t(

<* .&~&:-':UZ:. --- -.

AY
CHW NN-BUIL1 LIGHTWEIGHT
YOU'LL BE SURE to get to class on time and still
have time for those last forty winks if you rent
a bike from THE CAMPUS BIKE SHOP. A basket
to carry your books is included in the weekly or
monthly rates.
OPEN SUNDAY AND EVENINGS
RELAX from those eight-weeks exams
and go bicycling.
ALL DAY TILL SIX P.M. Is $1.00.
FOR ONE HOUR, 25c.

11

wt I
#v
4
c y

Featured in MADEMOISELLE RCHARM
,GLAMOUR *"SEVENTEEN *.PHOTOP.AY
'iether a smooth newly-upped
Lair-do or long flowing locks.a4
FLAPJACK is yours to ear-our
wa :Cheltonfflat felt in an ar-
xay of exciting colors. Head sizes,
small; medium and large.

SALE
Skirts n' Sweaters
-Just in Time for School!

K
tS
S~
::

I

I

I

i i

I

III

Ill

I

"-D 4WD

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan