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August 15, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-15

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PAGE ST.'S

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"VI'EL NTx' SDAY, AUGUST 13,

__ _ ___ ____SD ,AUG ST15

ARMY TO DISCHARGE 5,000,000:

9,

Vast Number of Soldiers To Be Released
From Army; Draft Age To Be Lowered

I

CIIC

ICTORY.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 - President Truman tonight forecast that
5,000,000 to 5,500,000 men now in the Army may be returned to civilian life
within the next 12 to 18 months.
Furthermore, he said in announcing Japan's surrender, only the lowest
age groups will now be drafted into the army. Preliminary estimates indi-
cate only those under 26 will be called, Mr. Truman added.

His recommendation was that Se-l
lective Service reduce inductions im-
mediately from 80,000 a month to
50,000...
Occupation Troops
"It is too early to propose a defi-
nite figure for the occupation forces
which will be required in the Pacific
12 months from now or what reduc-
tion it may be possible to make in
the strength of the army force now
allotted to occupation duties in Eur-
ope," the President said in a state-
ment.
"It is apparent, however, that we
can release as many men as can be

brought home by the means available
during the next year."
Army releases will be speeded by
air and sea transportation in an ef-
fort to attain that. 5,000,000 to 5,-
500,000 figure, he said.
Mr. Truman said that in justice
to millions of men who have given
"long and faithful service under the
difficult and hazardous conditions of
the Pacific war and elsewhere over-
seas a constant flow of replacements
to the occupational forces is thought
Lo oe imperative."
He added that inductions of 50,000

Congress To Reconvene Sept. 5;
Tax Changes Added to Agenda

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 - Con-
gress, under the urgency of trans-
forming the nation from war to peace
was called today to reconvene Sept. 5.
Senate Democratic leader Barkley
(D-Ky.) voiced the hope that the
legislative body would work with the
same harmony in "the momentous
transformation" that marked "the
greatest victory ever won in a war
for freedom."
He asked tax adjustments, with re-
duction of individual and corporate
income taxes, as the sixth major
point on Congress' agenda. The other
points for consideration, which he

said conform with the President's
desire, are:
1. Expansion of unemployment
compensation.
2. Alteration of surplus property
disposal laws.
3. The so-called full employment
bill. through which sponsors hope
60,000,000 Americans will be gain-
fully employed.
4. Abolition of the no longer need-
ed war agencies; continuation of
others.
5. Government reorganization,
which was one of President Truman's
early recommendations as chief ex-
ecutive.

II ,

i
..

MAY THE TORCH
OF LIBERTY-
ALWAYS BURN!

The Radio & Record Shop

per month in the lowest age groups
"will provide only sufficient men tc
support the forces required for oc-
cupational duty and to permit th
relief of long-service men overseas
to the maximum extent transporta-
tion makes possible."
The present problem, he said, cen-
ters on the readjustment of person-
nel now in uniform and induction of
new men through Selective Service
to "permit the earliest possible re-
lease from the army of those men
who have long records of dangerous,
arduous and faithful service."
Didn't Mention Navy
The President did not mention the
Navy draft call, currently about 20,-
000 men a month.
Selective Service Director Lewis B.
Hershey said he had no word of the
Navy's plans, but that it would be
"reasonable to expect a cut there
too."
Actually men through 37 previous-
ly were subject to the draft, but in
practice calls the past few months
have been confined to men under 30.
.Hershey said he regarded the Pres-
ident's instructions "as a fiat prohi-
bition" on drafting men of 26 and
over.
Auto Workers
No-Strike Vow
To End Today
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, Aug. 14 - The CIO's
United Automobile Workers Union
tonight declared its no-strike pledge
ended.
A proclamation declaring the war-
time pledge at an end but expressing
hope there would be no "rash of
strikes" was issued by the Union's
top leadership at headquarters here.
The proclamation, announced by
President R. J. Thomas, Secretary-
Treasurer George F. Addes, and Vice-
Presidents Walter Reuther and Rich-
ard Frankensteen, was sent to the
Union's 1,000 locals in this country
and Canada.
OPinions . e
(Continued from Page 1)
until the objects of the occupation
period are fulfilled. Those who know
something of the Japanese people
and those who possess a competence
in the Japanese language," he con-
tinued, "will realize that a serious
responsibility exists and will exist
until we help the Japanese people
finally to accept the ideals and prac-
tices of a democracy."
Prof. Roy H. Holmes of the sociol-
ogy department said, "Reconversion
will be the big domestic problem. We
must get full employment, fix all
men and women on jobs."
Must Provide for Vets
Prof. Russell A. Stevenson, Dean
of the School of Business Admini-
stration, in commenting on this new
period we have just entered, stated,
"It will increase the importance of
our specialized programs for the vet-
erans that we have been planning
for some time. These include," he
went on, "refresher courses and spe-
cial courses in business administra-
tion and management for veterans
planning to go into business for
themselves."
"Providing 'for the increased en-
rollment will be a difficult problem
because of the difficulty in increas-
ing our own staff," Prof. Stevenson
explained.
"We have a number or research
projects under way dealing with the
postwar period. Now that we are in
that period, these studies will be of
particular concern," he said. "They
are intended to be of aid in adjust-
ment to the conditions that will de-
velop in the immediate future," Prof.
Stevenson added.

Half-Million Swell
Times Square, N.Y.C.
By The Associated Press
IN TIMES SQUARE, New York,
last night, a crowd of 150,000 that
almost lost heart during a day of
alternate hoping and doubting, swell-
ed to half a million when the news
finally came, and never had there
been such jubilation.
Not on Armistice Day, 1918, and
not on the day in 1945 when General
of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower
came home from the wars to an un-
paralleled ovation, had there been so
thunderous a roar, so joyous an oc-
casion.
Navy Cuts Contracts,
Curtails Shipbuildin
WASHINGTON, Aug. 14 -(IP)-
The Navy announced tonight it is
cancelling nearly' $6,000,000,000 in
prime contracts.
This is in addition to a recently

GENERAL MACARTHUR

ADMIRAL NIMITZ

ADMIRAL HALSEY

GENERAL MARSHALL

S P E A R H E A D S OF U. S. SOUTH PACIFIC MIGH.T -These U. S. Navy PBY patrol bonbers on an Australian
beach are part of a large force that scout the vast South Pacific sea and air in advance of heavier Anerican forces.

Ic.

CALKI NS=FLETCHER
WHO HAS SEEN MICHIGAN
THROUGH TWO WARS
REJOICES AT THE
VICTORIOUS CONCLUSION
OF

SEARCHLIGHT BARRAGE-Searchlights and tracer bullets probe the
sky for attacking Jap planes.

LANDING SHIP TANK-LCT's helped materially in the many south
Pacific invasions.

WORLD WAR

II

*

FOR

A

A 8 A N D 0 N S H I P !-Hundreds of men crowd the deck of the mortally-wounded U. S. aircraft carrier Lexington as the order to
abandon ship is given. Some men descend on ropes. The Lexington was lost in the Battle of the Coral Sea.

LASTING PEACE
*_

IA

111111

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