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August 15, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

momw-= l INI oil

Harmo
Etter Finishes,
Year as Sports
Publicit Chief
Served on Minnesota
Student Publications
Les Etter, who heads the publicity
department of the University ath-
letic association, celebrated his first
anniversary at Michigan this week.
This anniversary also marked the
15th year that Les has spent as a
reporter and public relations man.
His career started in his senior
year at the University of Minnesota
in 1930. That year he served in nu-
merous writing capacities such as as-
sistant sports editor on the "Min-
nesota Daily," sports editor of the
"Gopher," school year book, and pub-
licity ad manager of the school, a
job that was created the spring of
that year. Les also covered school
sports for the "Minneapolis Journal"
before graduating.
Working hard to establish himself
in the field of journalism, his next
move carried him to the "Duluth
News-Tribune," where he was as-
signed to coverage of police events.
He returned to Minnesota as a mem-
ber of the university news service
in 1935, shortly before taking a po-
sition with the Associated Press. In.
1937, he again resumed relations with
his Alma Mater, this time as director
of the news service. He spent some
time later as public relations man
for several private concerns before
coming here
In his present position, Les keeps
in constant touch with more than
600 newspapers and radio stations
throughout the country, sending
them all important sports news on
Michigan events. In addition, his
department issues a five-page month-
ly summary of sports events that
reaches more than 150 former "M"
students who are now in the armed
forces.
Etter was a member of the cross-
country and track teams at Minne-
sota, but as he aptly states, "I never
won any real recognition."

in

Receives

Discharge,

To

Return

Here

SPOUTS
iEWS +VIEWS + COMMENT
By BILL MULLENDORE, Sports Editor

v

Confused Sports Scene .. t
FOUR WEEKS from this coming Saturday, King Football will take over
the collegiate sports scene here at Michigan as the Wolverines make
their initial appearance of the season against Great Lakes at the Stadium.
From that date, Sept. 15, onward, Michigan's 1945 grid squad will see
action every weekend until Nov. 28 with the exception of the Oct. 20 date,
which has been left open owing to the intrusion of final exams.
Time was when no one thought of playing football until well along
into the month of October, but I.s schedules grow to include an ever-
increasing number of games, it has been necessary to lengthen the
season to accommodate the additions. Extension of the campaign fur-
ther into winter has its well-defined limits. Eventually, it becomes
too cold even to play football. Apparently, however, those who make
up the schedules don't worry about a possible heat wave during the first
few contests.
The result of all this schedule lengthening, and it has been going on
in other sports besiiles football, is that the formerly clearly-marked dividing
lines between one season and another have been fused almost beyond rec-
ognition. It used to be that football did not get underway until the baseball
season was pretty much a matter of history. Basketball and the other
winter sports followed football, baseball took the place of ice hockey in
the spring, and so on.,
NO LONGER is that the case. Football, both collegiate and professional,
will be well started this fall long before the curtain has rung down on
the final World's Series game. Michigan will play its first basketball
games under the direction of Assistant Coach Bill Barclay, simply because
Head Coach Bennie Oosterbaan will still be occupied with his football
Iduties. And many other examples of this same sort of thing can be
found, both here at Michigan and in other places as well.
We don't know how others may feel on this matter, but for our
part we would just as soon see a return to the old way of doing
things. This new practice has served to leave the sports fan in some-
thing of a muddle, dividing his interests where he might otherwise
remain loyal. And, for some reason, we find it difficult to get particu-
larly enthused over a football game in the middle of September. Shirt-
sleeves and a boiling sun never did fit in with our conception of foot-
ball, which, in our mind, remains as a fall sport.
Another trick of the schedule-makers that has given us some unhappy
moments is the carding of home contests in three or four sports for the
same day, and, quite often, for the same hour. As a sports fan, we have
always been keenly interested in all forms of competition, but the funda-
mental truth that a man can't be two (or three, or four) places at once
makes it impossible to follow all teams closely. From the journalistic angle,
the practice is particularly maddening. If you don't believe us, just try to
,cover a basketball game, a swimming meet, and a hockey game at the
same time.

IN THE FAMILY:
'Brother Act'
Featured Tilt
With Wildcats
When Michigan played Northwes-
ern in football last season, two bro-
thers, playing on opposite sides of
the line, were playing against one
another.
The two players in question were
Quentin and Duane Sickles. Both of
these boys had played high school
football together, and upon grad-
uation went to different colleges.
These brothers were playing for
their high school in Benton Harbor,
when they both made the mythical
All-state team. The boys had good
reason to play excellent football, be-
cause their father was a football
coach at the junior high school in
Benton Harbor.
Duane went to Northwestern Uni-'
versity upon his graduation from
high school, and played right end for
the Wildcats. In 1943 he received
honorable mention for All-American
Football. Duane was a NROTC at
Northwestern, and played with them
for two years.
Quentin, on the other hand, came
to the University of Michigan upon
his graduation from high school. He
entered school last summer, and im-
mediately came out for the football
team. Due to his height and weight
which were 6 ft., 2, and 200 lbs., re-
spectively, he gained a berth on the
starting. eleven.

By HERB RUSKIN
Tom Harmon, called by many, one1
of the greatest backs Michigan has
ever seen, found himself a civilian
today for the first time in almost
four years.
Harmon, a Captain in the Army
Air Forces, received his discharge
last night and left to join his wife
and six-week-old daughter herewin
Ann Arbor.
Harmon came to Michigan as a
highly touted football player from
Gary, Indiana. He played his first
game in a Wolverine uniform against
Michigan State in 1938. It was in
that game that Harmon first showed
the stuff that was to make him All-
American for two years. Harmon
lugged the ball for two long gains,
even though he did not score in the
game.
During his long career, Harmon
scored 33 touchdowns, kicked two
field goals and 33 points after touch-
down. This gave him a total of 237
points for three years in a Michigan
uniform. As if that were not enough,

16 other Michigan touchdowns re-
sulted from his passes.
All-American in 1939 and 1940,
Harmon enlisted in the Air Corps in
November, 1941. He had two close
calls with death. The first occurred
in Dutch Guiana in April, 1943, when
the bomber he was flying crashed in-
to the jungle. Harmon, however, par-
achuted to safety. The other oc-
curred when his plane was shot down
over China in October of the same
year. He was found 32 days later.
Harmon holds the Silver Star and
the Purple Heart medals.
Harmon's plans are still indefinite,
but he might return to radio sports
announcing, at which he had a short
whirl after his graduation.
MOSELEY TYPEWRITER CO.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
SOON - ORDER NOW!

Former Ali-American
A Civilian Once More
'Gary Ghost' Silent on Possible Pro Offers;
May Return to Career as Sports Announcer

1 14 So. 4th Ave.

Ph. 58881

TOM HARMON
Nussbaumer May Return
There is a rumor that Bob Nuss-
baumer, former Wolverine foot-
ball player, will be discharged from
the armed services.

F

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"GUEST
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LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Fraternity ring, identification
bracelet at Palmer Field Tuesday
evening. Call Daily, box 2.
LOST: One Physiology, lab manual,
between New Granada and East
Med. Bldg. Call 4493.
LOST: August 10, gold Bulova watch
in or between Rackham and Stock-
well. Reward. Call 24471. Jose-
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FOR SALE
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WANTED
WANTED: Two tickets to Saturday
night's performance of "Naughty
Marietta." Any seats. Call Michi-
gan Daily, Box 1, before Thursday
evening.
PERSONALS
A YOUNG NAVAL OFFICER on
leave, training for State Depart-
ment examinations, would like to
exchange a couple of hourstutoring
a day in French for three weeks
vacation at a beautiful northern
Michigan summer home for tutor
and wife. Leave Ann Arbor August
16 or 17, return September 6. Phone
Ann Arbor 2-4180 between 8:00 and
0:00 p. m, Lieut. Wells.

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
TEAMS W L Pet. GB
*Chicago ..........69 36 .657 ..
St. Louis .........65 44 .605 6
Brooklyn .........61 46 .570 9
New York.. .....59 50 .541 12
Pittsburgh .......57 54 .514 15
Boston ...........50 61 .450 22
Cincinnati ........43 62 .410 26
*Philadelphia ......28 79 .262 42
TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 7-6, Boston 5-2 (first
game 10 innings).
St. Louis 2, Brooklyn 1.
New York 5, Cincinnati 2.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Rain Postpones
Detroit Game
Yank-Tiger Clash Will
Take Place in N. Y.
DETROIT, Aug. 14 - (W) - Rain
washed out the fifth and final game
of Detroit's series with the New York
Yankees today, forcing transfer of
the scene of the clash to New York,
where it will be played as part of a
seven-game series opening Sept. 4.
Jim Tobin had fanned George
(Snuffy) Stirnweiss and had a count
of three and two on Art (Bud) Me-
theny when rain put a stop to today's
game with one out in the top half
of the first inning.
After an hour's delay the teams
took their places on the field to re-
sume play but before Tobin could
throw another pitch a downpour made
further play impossible.
The washout gave Detroit a sweep
of the four games that were played
here with the Yanks.
Second place Washington opens a
fourg-game set with the Tigers here
tomorrow and manager Steve O'Neill
of the Detroit club said Tobin would
start the first game against the Sen-
ators.

';'
, r=
u

0
EARLY AMERICAN

I

W L Pct.
Detroit ..........61 43 .587
Washington ......58 47 .552
Chicago ..........54 50 .519
New York ........52 49 .515
Cleveland ........53 51 .510
St. Louis .........51 52 .495
Boston ...........51 55 .481
Philadelphia......34 67 .337
TUESDAY'S RESULTS

GB
31/z
7
71/
8
101/2
11
251/

/f

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

XA

OLD SPICE in cologne,
soap, dusting powder,
talcum, bath salts, and
sachet.

COOL!

Last Times Today

Philadelphia at Chicago, rain.
Cleveland 3, Boston 0.
St. Louis 5, Washington 4.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

Starts Thursday

WED., AUG. 8, 1945
E.W.T.
7:00-News
7:05-Morning Round-Up
7:15-Sleepy Head Serenade
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55-Musical Interlude.
9:00-News.
5.05-Music Box.
9:30-Little Show.
9:45-Lean Back and Listen
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15-What Do You Know.
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.

10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Popular Vocalist.
11:15-Listen Ladies.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
11:55 Martial & College Airs.
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Milt Herth.
12:30-Trading Post
12:45 Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Dick Gilbert
1:15-Reuel Kenyon.
1:30-Lawrence Welk.
1:45-Ellen Mitchell-Al &
Lee Reiser.
1:55-Today's Hit Tune
2:00-News.
2:05-Bob Chester.
2:15 Duke Ellington.

2:45 Baseball Brevities.
2:55-Baseball (Bos. at
Det.)
5:00-News.
5:05-Music for Listening.
5:10-Hollywood Reporter
5:15-Mystery Melodies.
5:30-Rec. Room Rythms.
5:45-Sports Review.
6:00-News.
6:15-Albert Wallace.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Flashes from Life.
6:55-Piano Interlude.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Popular Music.
7:30-Evening Serenade.
7:45-Dave Reed.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time
8:15-Put & Take It.

'1

i t I X-

der *(eh

7

EARLY AMERICAN
".ti

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