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August 12, 1945 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-12

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGTAN fDAILY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 12. 1945

0 xsvr . a aaL1

Second Atomic Bomb Dropped on
Japan Packs More Punch than.

$2

Billion

First

One; Is

Easier

To Control

{

30Per Cent City Destroyed*
Big Crater Forme Missile
Shipping, Aircraft, Steel Industries, Rail,
Naval Installations Wrecked or Damaged

By The Associated Press
GtAM, Sunday, Aug. 12-Brig.
Gen. Thomas F. Farrell, commander
of America's atomic bomb operations
in the Pacific, declared yesterday
that the A-Bomb which struck the
war-bristling city of Nagasaki packed
more punch than the first one drop-
ped on Hiroshima.
Farrell said the second bomb not
only was more potent, but made obso-
lete the No. 1 parcel of death, and
was less difficult to construct.
30% Nagasaki Destroyed
The U. S. Army Strategic Air For-
ces announced that 30 per cent of
Nagasaki had been destroyed in the
mission of devastation Thursday.
Reconnaissance photographs show-
ed that destruction at Hiroshima was
greater, however. General Spaatz
strategic command said 60 per cent
of Hiroshima was destroyed in the
bombing last Monday.
Farrell did not elaborate on the in-
creased potency of the bomb or its
manufacture, size or weight, nor on
the comparative destruction handed
the two cities.
Pictures Show Crater
Post-bombing pictures of Nagasaki
showed a great crater where the bomb
struck. No crater appeared in the
Hiroshima photographs. The Japa-{
nese claimed both missiles were drop-

ped by parachute and that the Hiro-
shima bomb exploded before it struck
the ground.
In any event, much of Nagasaki's
vast war facilities-shipping, aircraft
and steel industries, rail, naval and
other vital installations-were either
completely wrecked or heavily dam-
aged.
FBI Agents
Watched "Too0
WASHINGTON, Aug. 11-0)-Tho
Army kept such a tight guard on the
work of developing the atomic bomb
that even the FBI agents, who helped
guard its secrets, had to get special
passes to get into the bomb plants.
The War Department disclosed this
tonight in telling part of the story.
of a special intelligence and security
organization which protected the
war's best kept secret.
Two hand-picked men from the
Army Military Intelligence Division
were given the job of establishing
the intelligence and security policies.
These were Col. John Lansdale, of
{ Cleveland, O., and Lt. Col. W. A.
Consodine of Newark, N. J.

Germans Killed
Captured GIs,
Army Reveals
Raiders Found Buried
In Common Grave
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Aug. 11-Fifteen
American soldiers were ruthlessly
executed by Germans on March 26,
1944, in complete disregard for the
rules of warfare, the War Department
said today.
The Army said two officers and 13
enlisted men were on a military mis-
sion, trying to blow up a railroad
tunnel near La Spezia, Italy. They
were captured, it continued, and al-
though they were wearing uniforms,
were executed and buried in a com-
Mon grave.
Retribution Sought
"Every effort has been made to
apprehend the Germans responsible
for the execution," the statement
said. "At present, several are in' cus-
tody and are expected to be brought
to trial in the near future."
The Army told this story:
An attempt was being made to cut
all German communications in prep-
aration for an Allied offensive which
later resulted in the liberation of
Rome.
Fifteen Volunteer
A special crew of 15 volunteered
to put one important railroad line out
of commission. When they were
landed on the Italian mainland by
navy PT boats, the PT's ran into a
German convoy. In the battle that
followed one PT was damaged, and
when it was all over it was too light
to pick up the men on shore.
The PTs were back the next night,
but German patrol boats kept them
from landing. The next night a
heavy storm drove them away. But an
airplane flew over the area, and the
pilot reported the tunnel had not
been blown up, and that there was
no sign of the raiding party.
Learn of Capture
Later it was learned that the party'
had been captured, and a German
broadcast boasted that a Commando
raiding party had been "wiped out."
The 15 men were listed as missing in
action.
More than a year later, in April,
1945, two officers made an on-the-
spot investigation. They found that
the 15 men had been executed, and
they located their common grave.
Each man still was in his uniform;
each had his hands tied behind his
back; each was barefooted.
The Army reburied them in an
American military cemetery.
The War Department's list of the
15 included Technician Fifth Grade
Santoro Calcara, Detroit.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

SUN., AUG. 12, 1945
Eastern War Time
8:00-News.
8:05-Organ Music.
8:15-Jimmy Wakely.
8:30--Frankie Masters.
9:00-News.
9:05-Ralph Ginsburg.
9:30-Ava Maria Hour.
10) :00-News.
10:15-Edmond Pierson.
10:30-Charlie Barnett.
10:45-Jesse Crawford.

11:00-News.
11:05-Second Baptist
Church.
12 :00--News.
12:05-Mario Morelli.
12:30-Music & Verse.
12:45-Paul Baron.
1:00-News.
1:15-Baseball Brevities.
1:25-Baseball (New York
at Detroit) (2).
5:00-News.
5:15--Johnny Long.
5:30-Wake Up America.

6:00-News.
6:05-Wilson Ames,
6:15---Grace Bible Fellow-
ship.
6 :30-Concert Hall.
6:45-Concert Hall.
7:00-News.
7:05--Music for Sunday.
7:25-Popular Music.
7:30-Jerry Sears.
7:45-Eleanor Meston.
8 :00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.
8:15-Howard Farrar.

Elsenhower's
Plane Arrives
At Moscow
General Invited for
Short Pleasure Trip
By The Associated Press
MOSCQW, Aug. 11-Gen. Eisen-
hower and Marshal Georgi Zhukov
arrived in Moscow today by plane
and were greeted by a guard of hon-
or parading across the flag decorated
airport.
Eisenhower's visit was described
as a short pleasure trip at the in-
vitation of the Soviet Government.
He said:
"It is a great pleasure to be in the
capital of the country which con-
tributed so materially to the success
of the war against Germany."
Eisenhower was accompanied by
his son, Lt. John Eisenhower.
The Chief of the Red Army Gen-
eral Staff, Gen. S. A. Antonov, of-
ficially welcomed the former Allied
Supreme Commander.
Red Cross Will
Seek Workers
For Overseas
Miss Margaret Margrave and Miss
Thelma'Keyes, of the Red Cross Mid-
western Area office, St. Louis, Mo.,
will -be in Ann Arbor tomorrow and
Tuesday to recruit hospital workers
and women to go overseas in the
capacity of hospital and recreation
personnel.
Appointments for interviews with
the two personnel recruiting officers
may be made by calling the Red Cross
headquarters, now located at 1601
Washtenaw Ave.
The local campaign is being con-
ducted to fulfill the recruitment
quotas given all chapters of the Red
Cross.
"The need is described as desper-
ate," Mrs. Wells Bennett, chairman
of the local personnel recruitment
committee, said, "and we have been
informed that less than half of the
workers needed in hospital service
throughout the country are now on
duty."
The proximity of the end of the
war does not alter the need for Red
Cross help here and overseas, it was
pointed out.
The local chapter's quota is one
recreation worker, two social workers,
and three hospital staff aides.
The new headquarters for the local
chapter is 1601 Washtenaw Ave.
More Industry
Seen for Brazil
EAST LANSING, Mich., Aug. 11-
()-A Michigan State College horti-
culturist just back from two years
in Brazil where he served with the
Food Supply Division of the Coor-
dinator of Inter-American Affairs,
today predicted that the large Latin
American nation would soon exper-
ience a tremendous growth in agri-
culture and industry.
H. A. Cardinell, research associate
in horticulture, was granted a leave
of absence in 1943 to be senior ag-
ricultural extension specialist with
the staff organized to increase civil-
ian food supplies.
The work of Cardinell and his as-
sociates was to help relieve the food
problem and work toward improving
agricultural methods of Brazil.
CLASSIFIED

DIRECTORYI
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Phi Delta Theta pin. H. J. K.,
Jr., Mich. Alpha on back. Call
Jayne Gourley, 24514. 836 Tappan.
LOST: Welsbro Sweep second men's
watch. Green strap. Contact Jim
Landers, telephone 9896.
LOST: Fraternity ring, identification
bracelet at Palmer Field Tuesday
evening. Call Daily, box 2.
FOR SALE
STANDARD ROYAL TYPEWRITER
for sale. Like new. Call Leo Boron,
3018.
I W A WUId1W! "!.L...MW7 .M

Neededby
UNRRA
By The Associated Press
LONDON, Aug. 11-Director Gen -
cral Herbert Lehman tonight esti-
mnated, "more than $2,000,000,000" in
new funds would be necessary to car-
ry on the task of the United Nations
Relief and Rehabilitation Admini-
stration because the work had been
"suddenly doubled" by the approach
of the end of the war in the Pacific.
In a speech prepared for delivery
over CBS while the third interna-
tional conference of UNRRA was in
recess over the weekend, hiedeclared
that "large as this sum may seem, it
will barely suffice Io bridge the gap
until the minimum of restoration has
been achieved."
$1,500,000,000 for Next Year
Earlier this week he told the con-
ference that "at least" $1,500.00.000
more would be needed to finance the
organization's program through the
next ,year.
The former governor of New York
said that "if the United Nations can-
not pull together for the most urgent
of all their endeavors--relief and re-
habilitation of those crushed by the
war-then there will be little hope
for their pulling together for larger
tasks of building the peace."
Supplies To China
Lehman said plans had been for-
mulated for sending supplies, chiefly
trucks, over the Stilwell Road, and
an even larger program of shipments
through the ports of liberated China,
calling for "some hundreds of thou-
sands of tons."
Earlier in the day Australia had
demanded a broader base for'
UNRRA's central government, urg-
ing its expansion from four to nine
members to give greater representa-
tion to the smaller nations.
The proposal was sent to commit-
tee for study, delaying temporarily, a
plan to give France and Canada im-
mediate membership.
Empire Builderi
Crash Death
Total Mounts
MICHIGAN, N. D., Aug. 11-UP-
Great Northern Railway officials to-
day reported removal of a 34th body
from the wreckage of the Empire
Builder and said incomplete reports
indicated the list of injured in Thurs-
day night's collision would approxi-
mate 214.
The last body found was that of
a man; believed to be a civilian.
John Cameron, division superin-
tendent, said the shell of the tain's
observation-sleeping car had been
removed from the locomotive of the
second train which telescoped it.
He said no other bodies were dis-
cernible in the remaining debris.
Identification of the 34 dead pro-
ceeded slowly. The Fort Snelling
public relations officer said the
names of 17 servicemen included
among them would not be made pub-
lic until after the next of kin had
been notified.

I. JOE,

_ . _ ._

I

NOW ON THE SCREEN
The immortal motion picture of the Tittle man
with the big heart who loved and understood
your fighting G.I. From the pages of his true,
human stories, "Here Is Your War" and "Brave
Men"
TOY LE'S

ALEXANDER DRUG STORE
727 NORTH UNIVERSITY
E WAnnounces
NEW STORE HOURS
OPEN WEEK DAYS from 8:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M.

Mornet Asks Death Sentence
For Petain as Trial Nears End
Prosecutor Cites Actions of V ishy Premier;
Cliaxes Speech with Charge of 'Treason'
By The Associated Press seek a death sentence for Petain and
PARIS, Aug. 11-The prosecution then ask clemency.,
demanded the death penalty for 89- The silver-haired old soldier, who
yeam-old Marshal Philippe Petain to- still is a Marshal of France, was doz-
day as France's greatest trial in 150 ing comfortably in his chair as Mor-
years neared its close. net made his demand at the climax
Prosecutor Andre Mornet, summing of a five-hour speech. Petain is hard
up state's evidence given during 17 of hearing.
trial days; told the high cou't, that Decision Expected Tuesday
the former head of the Vichy gov- The decision is expected next Tues-
erment had: day night. For the first time in
Accepted a "dishonorable armis- French history the radio will be taken
tice." into the court to disclose the outcome
Shown "servility to Ge-mans" and of the ease, which is comparable in
condoned the "assassination'of French trial history to that of King
French patriots." Louis XVI in 1793. Louis was be-
Worked "systematically against our'headed.
Allies." Mornet read a sheaf of messages
Calls It Treason which. quoted Petain a ordering var-
"That is treason," the red-robed ions'French commanders ing orth
prosecutor shouted. "It is a crime for Africa and Syria to resist Allied mi-
which no excuse exists. For four years, tary operations. He accused Petain of
Petain was guilty of treason.tI mews- indirect responsibility for the mur-
Lire my words when I say that. der of ex-Minister of the Interior
"I ask the death penalty for him Georges Mandel, and said Petain had
who was Marshal of France." scuttled France's fleet at Toulon when
Mornet said last April lie would he might have sent it to the Allies.

Starring
BURGESS MEREDIT H as E RNIE PYLE
with ROBERT MITCHUM as THE CAPTAIN
FREDDIE STEELE as THE SERGEANT
WALLY CASSLL as THE PRIVATE
Extra
WALT DISNEY CARTOON
DONALD'S CRIME"
Shows Today at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

_. '

WAR BONDS
ISSUED HERE!

*

CONTINUOUS
DAILY FROM 1 P.M.

I

I

British Permit
German Schools
To Reorganize
WITH BRITISH FORCES IN GER-
MANY, Aug. 11--(;P)-Schools for
children between the ages of six and
10 rapidly are being reopened in the
British occupation zone in Germany.
The German teachers employed
must take the following oath:
"I will not teach anything which
glorified militarism: which seeks to
propagate, revive and justify the doc-
trines of National Socialism or exalt
the achievements of Nazi leaders;
which favors a policy of discrimina-
tion on the grounds of race and reli-
gion: which is hostile to or seeks to
disturb the relations between any of
the United Nations; which expounds
the practice of war or the mobiliza-
tion or preparation for war whether
in the scientific, economic or indu-
strial fields, or which promotes the
study of military geography."
Lay That Pistol Down
GUAM, Sunday, Aug. 12-(A)-The
announcer of the Guam radio sta-
tion for the armed services broke
into a musical program today to an-
nounce the Allies' conditional ac-
ceptance of Japan's surrender offer.

NOW!
STARTS TODAY!

BARGAIN MATINEES WEEKDAYS 30c to 5 P.M.

77.
:7 -, '. ;r 1 11 7' r
:8 " t ' 'r 'T t:0

- I

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_

THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PRESENTS
THE MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
. . . lIn . . .

VtM A 0 10-4 M'WW

A nN E A FF

i

I } lid P $ a ° ._: away ... :. 35 l w Iaw.._ Wt6 Y srrgtV ':

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