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August 11, 1945 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIG AN DAILY

SATURDAY. AUGUST 11.194s

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Marine Gets
Citation For
3 Campaigns
Pvt. Duter Served
On Guam, Iwo Jima
For meritorious service on several
Pacific Islands, Rex T. Duter, now
with the Marine detachment at the
University, received a Marine Corps
citation this week.
The citation, signed by Maj. Gen.
G. B. Erskine, U. S. Marine Corps,
commanding officer, reads: "For
meritorious service while serving
with a Marine infantry regiment at
Bougainville, British Solomon Islands
from November 6,1943, to January,j
1944; at Guam, Marianas Islands,
from July 21, 1944, to August 15,
1944; and at Iwo Jima, Volcano
Islands, from February 21, 1945, to
March 16, 1945."
The citation continues, "In the
first of these three campaigns Cor-
poral Duter served as a radio oper-
ator; at Guam, he was a radio op-
erator; and at Iwo Jima he served
as a radio operator. Throughout
these periods of repeated action a-
gainst the enemy, his unflagging zeal
in the face of extreme hardship and
danger, and his outstanding devo-
tion to duty, were an inspiration to
all who served with his. He made
a material contribution to the suc-
cess of these operations. His exem-
plary conduct was in keeping with
the highest traditions of the United
States Naval Service."

Duter, whose home is
kee, Wisconsin, joinedt
Corps in July, 1942. He
University in June, 1945.

in Milwau-
the Marine
entered the

Center Will I
Salute Students
From Far East
Gale, Edmonson, Chin
To Address Group
"The International Center Salutes
Our Far Eastern Students on the
War's End" is the title of the pro-
gram to be presented at 8 p. m. EWT
tomorrow at the International Cen-
ter.
Speakers for the occasion are: Dr.
S. M. Gale, counsellor to foreign stu-
dents, whose subject is "AncOld Chi-
na Hand Greets the Peace;" Dean
James B. Edmonson of the educa-
tion school, who will speak on "The
University Congratulates the Chinese
Students;" and Miss Betty Chin,
whose topic is "As a Chinese Girl
Saw the War." Miss Chin, who is a
student here, is from Chunking.
Other speakers will be Prof. W.
Carl Rufus, secretary of Barbour
Scholarship committee, who will
speak on "America, China and Ko-
rea in the Peace." Miss Rosalie
Jhung, a native of Korea, will follow
Prof. Rufus, speaking on "Korea at
Long Last Free." P. C. Ku, presi-
dent of the Chinese Students Club,
will give the last address. His sub-
ject is "What the War's End Means
to Us Chinese."
Refreshments will be served at
the program, and all Far Eastern
students, their friends and faculty
members are invited.
Prof. Lobanov
Will Discuss
Soviet Enigma
"What Not To Believe About Rus-
sia" is the topic of a talk to be given
by Prof. A. Lobanov-Rostovsky of
the history department before a
meeting of Russky Kruzhok, Russian
Circle, at 8:15 p. m. EWT Monday,
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Prof. Lobanov will analyze and
discuss some of the erroneous ideas
and beliefs concerning Russia. He
will analyze these half-truths from
the political, geographical, historic-
al and economic angles.
Teaching Standards Will
Not Be Lowered -- Elliott
LANSING, Aug. 10-OP)-An esti-
mated shortage of 1,000 rural school
teachers in Michigan for the ap-
proaching school year will not force
the lowering of teaching standards,
Dr. Eugene B. Elliott, state super-
intendent of public instruction, said
today.
State Men Discharged
LANSING, Aug. 10-()-State Se-
lective Service headquarters an-
nounced todaythat 10,528 Michigan
men were discharged from the armed
forces during July, twice the num-
ber who returned in June.
ertion im 71oaern
NOW
ROMANCE...
The Love Life
of a Girl Who
MIGHT be YOU

Vi

Co-ops To Give
'Co-Hop Dance'
Co-Hop, an outdoor dance spon-
sored by the Inter-Cooperative Coun-
cil, will be given from 9 to midnight
EWT- Saturday, Aug. 18, in the Uni-
versity parking lot behind U Hall.

GEN. MACARTHUR READS NEWS-Gen. Douglas MacArthur, com-
mander of the Army forces in the Pacific, reads the news of Russia's
declaration of war against Japan.
(AP Wirephoto via Signal Corps Radio from Manila)
THINK IT OVER, NIPPON:
Text of Potsdam Ultimatum
EDITOR'S NOTE: Reprinted here is the text of the Potsdam declaration all the
provisions of which the Japanese find adequate. Missing from the declaration is a
definite statement as to the status of the emperor. This, according to late dis-
patches is the point the Jap government wants clarified before accepting peace
terms.
The ultimatum contained these points:
1. Elimination "for all time" of the authority and influence of those
who led Japan into her career of conquest.
2. Occupation of points in Japanese territory to be designated by
the Allies until a "new order of peace and security" in the world is
assured.
3. Limitation of Japanese sovereignty to the main Japanese islands
of Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu, Shikoku and a few ninor islands.
4. Carrying out the terms of the Cairo Declaration which would strip
Japan of all her conquests.',
5. Complete disarmament of Japanese Armed Forces.
6. No enslavement of the Japanese nation.
7. Stern justice for waa criminals.
8. Removal by the Japanese government of all obstacles to a revival
of democracy, freedom of speech, religion and thought.
9. Permission for Japan to retain such industries as will sustain her
economy and permit reparations in kind.
10.. Access for Japan to raw materials and world trade.
11. A promise to withdraw occupying Alfied forces when Japan has
established a peacefully-inclined government "in accordance with the
freely expressed will of the Japanese peqti 4.o
'MUSIC OF SPEECH'
Linguistic Institute To Hear
Pike at Rackham Wednesday

Sun Goddess, a "Son of Heaven.",
But to the Western world, the
124th emperor of Japan was not even
a regal figure. Middle age found him
pudgy, short even for his race,
stooped, his mustard colored uniform
a little too tight in the wrong places.
He carried his head thrust for-
ward as if to get his myopic, thick
lensed eyes as close as possible to
whatever there was to see.
Some authorities close to Hirohito's
court said he would have been a man
of peace if he had had his way and'
would not have gone to war withl
the United States had lie actually
held a small part of the power at-
tributed to him.
They held the opinion that he hadI
no real chance to prevent Japan's
entry into World War 11 on the side}
of the Rome-Berlin axis, assuming
that he wanted to, for the fate of
Japan, of his dynasty and of himself
was in other hands.
Actually his personal views made
little difference for he was a figure-
head, the vast powers of the throne
always wielded in his name by a
group of his subjects strong enough
to seize control.
For a decade prior io Pearl Har-
bor, the dominant group was com-
posed of generals and admirals,
and Hirohito had to do their bid-
ding. That group used the mys-
tical authority of the emperor to
regiment and dragoon the people
into war.
Whatever his personal inclination,
Hirohito dutifully played the role ex-
pected of him by the real rulers of
Japan - the generals and admirals.
In the imperial rescript proclaim-
ing Japan at war with the United
States and Britain, Hirohito called
on the "hallowed spirits of our im-
perial ancestors" and "the courage
of our subjects" to achieve victory
and make possible the preservation
of the "glory of the empire."
He repeated Japan's argument that
the United States and Britain pro-
longed the war in China by aiding
the Chunking government, thus leav-
ing Japan "no other recourse but to
appeal to arms."
The late President Franklin .
Roosevelt sent to Congress a few
days later the documented story
of the peace talks that smoke-
screened Japan's sudden Sunday
morning attack on Pearl Harbor
to bring the United States to
grips with Japan.
His message characterized it as a
record for "all history to read in
amazement, in sorrow, in horror and
in disgust."
The late president revealed that
it was not until three days after the
treacherous attack on United States
ships, men and territory, that he re-

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

SAT., AUG. 11, 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00--News.
7:05-Songs by Rudy Check
7:15-Sleepy Head Serenade
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55-Musical Interlude.
9:00-News.
9:05-Music Box.
9:30-Little Show.
9:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00--News.
10:05-David Rose & Orch.
10:15-What Do You Know.
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.
10:45--Waltz Time.

11:00--News.
11:05-Kiddies Party.
11:30--Farm & Home Hour
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Merle Pitt.
12:25-College & Martial
Airs.
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Dick Gilbert.
1:15-U. of M.
1:30-Mitch Ayres.
1:45-Phil Hanna.
1:55-Today's Hit Tune.
2:00--News.
2:05-John Kirby.
2:15-Jerry Wald.
2:45--Baseball Brevities.

2:55-Baseball (Bos. at
Detroit),
5:00-News.
5:05-Music for Listening.
5:10-Hollywood Reporter.
5:15-Hollywood Preview.
5 :30-Rec. Room Records.
5:45-Sports Review.
6:00-News.
6:15-Albert Wallace.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Flashes From Life.
6:55-Piano Interlude.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harnton*s.
7:25-Popular Music.
7:30-Front Page Drajma.
7:45-Evening Serenade.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.
8:15--Put & Take It.

ceived an answer to his urgent mes-
is divine, a direct desc eidi nt of the

lii -- M._._ - -

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r i

ALEXANDER DRUG STORE
727 NORTH UNIVERSITY
Announce:
NEW STORE HOURS
OPEN WEEK DAYS from 8:30 A.M. to 10:00 P.M.

UDGY 'SON OF HEAVEN':
Hirohito MightHave Been 'Man of Peace'

asking this cooperation in further
efforts to preserve peace.
This answer was to the effect that
the emperor's "cherished desire" was
establishment of peace in the Pacific
and that "his majesty trusts that
the President is fully aware of this
fact."
Japan's ambassador, Kichisaburo

Nomura, and special envoy, Saburo
Kurusu were still negotiating for
"peace" in Washington on Dec. 7
when the Japanese attacked Pearl
Harbor. Upon their return to Japan
some months later, they were re-
warded with a dozen bottles of wine
and other delicacies from the emper-
or "in recognition of their conduct of
Japanese-American relations."

------

.

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL!

Last Times Today -

Learn-to FLY'!
It's part of a Modern Education
ENROLL NOW IN OUR LOW-COST CLUB PLAN
This ad is worth $5.00 to you if you enroll during
the month of August. Bring the ad with you.
Gridley Flying Service
(Formerly Ann Arbor Aircraft Co.)
ANN ARBOR AIRPORT
Phone 25-8825 4320 S. State St.
VISITORS ARE WELCOME

with Alan Curtis- Noah Beery, Jr.
Coming Sunday

THE
RELEASED
ARTISTS 0 1 NL
Linda DARNELL. Barbara BRITTON
an nrducing
Greg McCLURE
as John L. Sullivan

A public lecture-demonstration,
"The Music of Speech," will be given
by Dr. Kenneth L. Pike, lecturer in
phonetics in the Linguistic Insti-
tute, at 7:30 p. m.EWT,Wednesday
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Of special interest to speech and
drama students will be Dr. Pike's
method ofdemonstrating the teach-
ing of intonation, stress and pause.
He intends to show by means of
slides a passage of a play in which
he has marked these qualities ac-
cording to his ' own pronunciation,
and will recite the passage, following
the text on the screen with a flash-
light.
Dr. Pike's description, from the
point of view of a scientific analysis
of vocal processes, of the articula-
USO Hostesses
To Hold Meeting
Women who wish to become USO
junior hostesses must attend an ori-
entation meeting at 730 p. m. EWT
Monday in the USO Club at State
and Huron.
All women between the ages of 18
and 30 who will be on campus for
some time are eligible. They are
expected to contribute one hour a
week in addition to the social hocial
hours.
If possible, two letters of reccom-
mendation, one from a minister,
should be brought to the meeting.

tory basis for good tone production,
will be of particular interest to mu-
sic students.
For students of English and other
languages he will illustrate the im-
portance of intonation in determin-
ing meaning by pronouncing the
same expression with various inton-
ations.
Flood of Joy
Boils over All
Allied World
By The Associated Press
A mighty flood of jubilation boiled
up throughout the Allied world yes-
terday (Friday) with the news that
Japan had offered to surrender.
While caution checked celebrations
in the United States, rockets soared
skyward from far Pacific basesand
American soldiers, without waiting
for an official end to hostilities,
surged through the streets of London
cheering and singing.
Firecrackers exploded the length
and breadth of Free China, and the
canyon-like str.;ets of Chunking
were jammed with men, women
and children yelling their delight
at the imminent end of the "dwarf
devils" aggression.
America watched and waited.
Bursts of torn paper fluttered down
from New York's skyscrapers and
troops returning from Europe set
up a jubilant din when they heard
the report that led them to believe
they might be going home instead of
toward Tokyo.
New York's 14,800 policemen were
ordered to stand by for a demonstra-
tion far greater than the one V-E
Day. %w i ver the actual end of the
war should come.
Washington was quiet but tension
mounted hourly.
Ticker tape was showered down
from some buildings in Detroit
but most large cities, like the small
towns, awaited developments.
There was no such calm at Pearl
Harbor, scene of the sneak attack
that brought the United States into

CO0ME 10 4
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State
Ministers: Dr. James Brett Kenna
Rev. Robert H. Jongeward
Mark W. Bills, Summer Director
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Student class, Wesley Foundation
Lounge.
10:40 A.M.: Church School for children - Nur-
sery through sixth grade.
10:40 A. M.: Worship Service. "The Dimensions
of Life" by Dr. Kenna.
6:00 Wesleyan Guild meeting at the home of
Qr. and Mrs. Kenna, 2016 Seneca Avenue.
The topic is "Intelligent Living in the Larger
Self" by Dr. G. E. Carrothers. Those not
knowing the direction may meet in the lounge
at 5:30.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. A. Shrady Hill, Curate.
(Eastern War Time)
Sunday. Aug. 12---
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M.: Morning prayer and sermon by Mr.
Hill.
11:00 A.M.: Nursery and kindergarten at Tatlock
Hall.
5:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club (students and serv-
icemen) meeting at the Student Center, 408
Lawrence, to go to the Hall farm,
Tuesday, Aug. 14-
10:00 A.M.: Holy Communion, War Shrine.
Wednesday, Aug. 15-
7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by break-
fast at Student Center, reservations, phone
5790).
Friday, Aug. 17-
4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Open house, Student Center.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Alfred Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 11:00: Service with Holy Communion.
ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC STUDENT
CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mass: Daily 6:30, 7:00, 8:00.
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 10:00, 11:30.
Novena devotion Wednesday evening, 7:30.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
sponsored jointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches
Zion Lutheran Church-
E. Washington St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A. M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rob-
ert Eibling, Vicar.
Trinity Lutheran Church-
E. William St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A. M.: Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Henry O. Yoder.
Lutheran Student Association-
309 E. Washington St.
3:00 P. M.: Meet at Trinity Lutheran Church
and leave from there for the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Daniel Bennett who will be hosts
for the afternoon and evening.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Director of Student Work: Rev. H. L. Piclerill
Assistant Director: Miss Bobbie Simonton
Choir Director: Leonard V. Meretta
Organist: Howard R. Chase
(Eastern War Time)
10:45 A.M.: Public worship. Prof. Preston W.
Slosson will give the sermon, his subject be-
ing, "The Seven Virtues of Science."
4:30 P.M.: Congregational - Disciples Student
Guild will have a midsummer Homecoming
party for former students in and near Ann
Arbor, at Riverside Park.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
Aug. 12: Spirit.
10:30 A.M.: Lesson sermon.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P. M. Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
This church maintains a free Reading Room
at 706 Wolverine Bldg., Washington at Fourth
which is open daily except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Here the Bible
and Christian Science literature including all of
Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy's works may be read,
borrowed or purchased.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counselor
Ruth McMaster, Associate Student Counselor
ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD HOUSE

Also
"DAY IN DEATH VALLEY"
Paramount News
Dippy Diplomat
cartoon
Sunday: "G. 1. Joe"

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ROJACI C. NKEIN /ANU T1UKEtY the way you like
! them, savory BAKED HAM, and a dozen other

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