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August 03, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAOZ SEE'

U

Gridder s

Ready

for

Practice

Game

Tomorrow

I

Tigers Shut Out St. Louis, 6-0;
Mayo Hits Two Circuit Blows

f

1 - - --________-______

I I

SPORTS
NEWS + VIEWS + COMMENT
By BILL MULLENDORE, Daily Sports Editor

Assistant Coaches To Handle Team
As Crisler AttendsBigTenMeeting

Detroit Gets Sixth
Straight Victory
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, Aug. 2--A pair of time-
ly homers by Eddie Mayo, his second
and third in two days, drove in four
runs today as the Detroit Tigers
stretched their winning streak to six
games-longest this year-by beat-
ing the St. Louis Browns, 6-0.
Al Benton, big righthander return-
ed to the Tigers this season from the
Navy, scattered seven hits in making
his 10th victory his fifth shutout.
For seven innings, the game was
a tight pitchers' battle between Ben-
ton and Jack Kramer, with Mayo's
third inning home run providing the
Tigers with a 1-0 margin.
The Tigers had only four hits off
Kramer until they exploded for five
runs in the eighth, three of them
on Mayo's ninth circuit swat of the
season and another on Hank Green-
berg's lofty double that dropped
against the left field wall.
Benton, reducing his earned run
average to 0.89, fanned five Brown-
ies-three of them in one inning-
and pitched his way out of a tight
spot in the sixth when St. Louis put
men on second and third with only
one out. The Browns had two men
as far as third and advanced only
three others to second.
The Tigers had eight hits off Kram-
er and lefthander Sam Zoldak, hand-
ing Kramer his 10th defeat.
A crowd of 13,782 fans watched
the Tigers waste a scoring chance in

the second inning when they filled
the bases with two out, but Detroit
made the most of every opportunity
thereafter, leaving only four run-
ners stranded on the bases.
Rudy York's single, Bob Maier's

1k

i

* AL BENTON
Among those present .
double and an intentional pass to
Bob Swift put three Tigers on board
in the second but Benton bounced
out to kill the rally.

EVERY SUMMER along about this time, approximately half the clubs
in the two Major Leagues decide things are ripe for a change of man-
agers. So, a few pilots get the boot, a few more are ushered in, the world
sits up and takes momentary notice, and affairs in general go on about
the same as before.
So far this season, one manager has been sacked, another is on the
doubtful list, and five more have reason to fear for their positions. The
fist to go rwas Bob Coleman of the Boston Braves, whose job was taken
over by coach Del Bisonetex. The ouster came as no surprise, as the
Braves are notorious for this business of changing leaders in the middle of
the pennant race.
Joe McCarthy of the New York Yankees, down in bed with gall
bladder trouble at his farm near Buffalo, is also probably on his way out.
McCarthy's case is a little bit different, however, since his retirement,
if it does come, will be a matter of choice rather than pressure.
Meanwhile, rumblings against managers are being heard at such
scattered points as Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and Philadelphia in the Na-
tional League, and at Cleveland and Washington in the American. Further
developments can be expected almost any day at any, or all, of these points
In every instance, with the possible exception of the McCarthy
puzzle, discontent stems from popular dissatisfaction with the team's
position in the current pennant scramble. The attitude seems to be
that a change in managers can accomplish miracles, can make ordinary
ball players into stars, and can automatically transfer lost games into
the win column. It doesn't work of course, but people seem to think it
does, and that is all that really matters.
N ONE in his right mind, for example, could possibly dream that a
'1 1managerial shift could do much to alter the plight of the Philadelphia
Phillies, perennial National League tail-enders. The Phils have had more
managers than a cat has kittens during the past few years, and still faith-
fully bring up the rear with monotonous regularity.
The trouble with the Phillies is not one that any human being
could solve as manager. Given John McGraw, Hughie Jennings, F
Miller Huggins, or McCarthy, the Phils would still be a last-place ball
club. They need players, not managers. But it is much easier to
get a new manager than a new ball club, and the fans seem to be just
as happy--if there are any fans left in Philadelphia.,
As a matter of fact, there is not a great deal of difference among
Major League managers. Occasionally, you find a very good one, or a
very bad one., but for the most part they are cut from pretty much the
same pattern. And the best of managers cannot win ball games with poor
playing talent, nor can the worst fail to win if handed the ranking stars
of the pastime.
Of course, some pilots seem to go on forever, regardless oI what
they do, or do not do. Jimmy Dykes of the Chicago White Sox is a
case in point. Most people cannot remember when the Sox last won a
pennant, but it was long before your time and ours. Yet, Chicago
fandom seems satisfied with the rotund, cigar-smoking, umpire-baiting,
loud-talking Mr. Dykes and his usual second division ball club. In
this respect, Chicago fans are more tolerant than most. Along with
the boosters of Connie Mack's Philadelphia A's, they seem to be the
only fan group around the circuit with enough sense to realize that no
manager can produce championship teams without championship
players.
MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Cubs Whitewash Pirates, O
Derringer Hurls Three Hitter

Offensive Tactics
Stressed in Drills
Under a hot sun, Michigan's 1945
football squad continued to prepare
for the first intra-squad game, which,
will be held tomorrow, six weeks be-

tactics as the boys continued to run
through basic line plunges and end
runs. Speed, mostly among linemen,
is still lacking, and its necessity is
being stressed.
Only Dress Rehearsal
Tomorrow's game wil) be a dress
rehearsal scrimmage, as no partic-
ular group of eleven men will work
together. Instead, various combina-
tions of line and backfield men will
be used and frequently changed a-
round. Head Coach H. O. (Fritz)
Crisler and his staff are more inter-
ested in how individuals are progres-
sing and how they act under simu-
lated game conditions. Crisler left
yesterday to attend a meeting of the
Western Conference Coaches at Ev-
anston, Ill., today and tomorrow. In
his absence, Coaches Munn, Ooster-
baan, Martineau and Junior Varsity
Coach Art Valpey will take over.
Positions Still Doubtful
At present, very iew positions have
been clinched, and tomorrow's tussle

Ii

'FRITZ'
Among the

CRISLER
missing . . .

ENG IN EERS!!
Vote Today!
TOMDO NIL
for
UNION, VICE-PRESIDENT

will be a decidinig factor in picking
a starting lineup. The quarterback
post is ably filled by Captain Joe
Ponsetto, Howard Yerges and Bill
Redmond. Halfback candidates are
Hank Fonde, Warren Bentz, Pete El-
liot, Russ Reader and Walt Teninga,
while Jim Foltz, George Chiames and
Dan Dworsky are holding down the
fullback spot.
The line picture is not as clear,
however. Harold Watts appears to
have the inside track on center; John
Lintol, Dom Tomasi, Joe Soboleski
and Cecil Freihofer are working for
guard assignments; George Johnson,
Al Wahl, Jim Rihberger and Bob
Callahan are trying for tackle; and
Ed Bahlow and Don Hershberger for
the ends.
After running off the various plays
yesterday, the squad was divided in-
to separate teams and went through
practice kick-offs. Wind sprints, un-
der the direction of Line Coach Munn
finished the afternoon's work.

fore the season's opener with Great
Lakes.
For the second straight day, the
Wolverines shed all their contact
equipment and worked out in T-
shirts and short pants, thus eliminat-
ing the possibility of scrimmage. Em-
phasis was still placed on offensive
Byrd Favored
I State Open
GRAND RAPIDS, Bich., Aug. 2-
(P-A field of nearly 200 of the
state's top profesional and amateur
golfers, including at least a dozen
former state champions, is expected
to tee off here tomorrow at Cascade
Hills Couniry Club in search of the
1945 Michigan Open chapnionship,
defended by Detroit's hard-hitting
Sam Byrd.
While Byrd, runner-up to Byron
Nelson in the 1945 National PGA
championship, is definitely rated as
the man to beat, the crack field in-
dicated that Byrd will have his hands
full defending the crown he won
last year at Orchard Lake with a
54-hole total of 208.
Top threat to Byrd this year in
the three-day tourney which has
been restored to its original 72-hole
distance, is Claude Harmon of De-
troit, runner-up two years straight.
Harmon, who bowed to Nelson in
the semi-finals of the National PGA,
finished a stroke better than Byrd
in last week's big Victory Open event
at Chicago.
Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

SCHWINN.BUILT LIGHTWEleHT
Plan a
BICYCLE DATE
WEATHER FAIR AND WARM .. the perfect
week-end for a bike-hike. Plan to start early
in the morning, cycle along cool, level River Drive,
swim and picnic at Delhi. Fun insured at $1.00
for the entire day.
OPEN SUNDAY AND EVENINGS
FOR A DATE THAT'S DIFFERENT, try an old-
fashioned ".Bicycle Build for Two" from the
CAMPUS BIKE SHOP. Also single- or three-speed
bikes ..baskets included to carry your lunch.
CAMPUS BIKRAE SHOP
510 East William Street, One Block from Campus
BUYING ... SELLING... REPAIRING

CHICAGO, Aug. 2 -(P)- Harry
(Peanuts) Lowrey slammed a double
into left field today with Don John-
son on first to give the Chicago Cubs
a 1-0 victory over the Pittsburgh
Pirates.
The game was almost a repetition,
in reverse, of Wednesday's game
when the Pirates handed the Cubs
a 1-0 beating, also on a double,Cand
also in the only inning in which
either team could put together two

hits.
Pittsburgh ...000 000 000--0
Chicago ......000 001 00x-1
Gerhauser, Roe and Salkeld;
ringer and Williams.

3 0
8 2
Der-

third, scoring Manager Lou Boudreau
and Al Cihocki hit a one-baser to
bring in Frankie Hayes who had
walked. Salveson's single scored
Mackiewicz and Cihocki. Meyer
doubled and Rocco - walked, filling
the bases for Seerey's homer.
Chicago .....120 031 000- 7 15 1
Cleveland .. .228 000 10x-13 17 0
Humphries, Ross, Johnson and
Tresh; Reynolds, Salveson, Klieman'.
Center and Hayes, Desautels.
Ruffing Stars for Yanks
BOSTON, Aug. 2 -()- Red Ruf-
fing, 40-year-old pitching veteran,
and first baseman Nick Etten teamed
up today to give the New York Yan-
kees a 3-1 victory over the Red Sox,
In winning his second straight
since his recent honorable discharge
from the Army, Big Red yielded only
seven hits and got all the runs he
needed when Etten clouted a homer
off Clem Hausman with two on .in
the first inning.
New York . . . .300 000 000-3 10 2
Boston .......100 000 000-1 7 0
Ruffing and Robinson; Hausmann,
Ryba, Barrett and Holm.

Indians Win Slugfest
CLEVELAND, Aug. 2 -(R)--- The
Cleveland Indians jumped to fifth
place today, dropping Chicago into
sixth as they defeated the Pale Hose
13-7, to take two out of the three-
game series.
The Tribe scored eight duns, in
a wild third inning as Pat Seerey
homered with the bases loaded, scor-
ing Jack Salveson, Dutch Meyer and
Mickey Rocco.
Felix Mackiewicz, singled in the
Twi-Night Doubleheader
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Philadelphia ...00'0 010 000-1 4 2
Washington .. .001 000 0001-2 6 0
Knerr and Rosar; Haefner and
Evans.
Philadelphia .. . 100 000 000-1 7 1
Washington .....000 000 20x2 6 1
Gerkin and George; Pieretti and
Guerra.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Left in Women's League, 2nd
floor washroom, white gold wrist-
watch. Finder please call 2-2986 or
Un. Ex. 505. Reward.
WANTED

TEAMS W
Detroit..........53
New York ........48
Washington ......47
Boston ..........47
Cleveland .........45
Chicago..........45
St. Louis ..........42
Philadelphia ......30

L
36
41
41
44
45
46
46
58

Pet.
.596
.539
.534
.516
,.500
.495
.477
.341

GB
5
5 1/
7
814
9
101
22%

NAT]
TEAMS
Chicago ...
St. Louis ..
Brooklyn .
New York.
Pittsburgh.
Cincinnati.
Boston
Philadelphia

LONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. G
........59 33 .641 ..
........56 41 .577 5
........53 39 .576 6
.,.....51 47 .520 11
.... 50 47 .515 11
........42 49 .462 16
........42 53 .442 18
a .....26 70 .271 35

B
Ca.
a
12

COTTON

SPORT CSLRTS
ALL COLORS

SWIM T RUNKS
HANDSOME WOOL AND COTTON GABARD!NE
TRUNKS IN PLAIN TAN, BLUE, AND YELLOW
OR PRINTED FABRIC. ESPECIALLY TREATED
TO DRY RAPIDLY.

Short Sleeves
Long Sleeves .
BE COOL!

. . . . $1.60 to $6.50
. .. $2.25 to $16.00
BE COMFORTABLE!

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