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July 16, 1944 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-07-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY WAR P A r--F'

S[TNT Y'''_ . '1

'- a.- ---avai v ri VTVtLy11I. Z. yy 11 1 AT U

r7U~r~t~iN .JUL

FRANCE
La
Haye AureR
Vs
Beauvais Cae n
ItGermain St
Lessay ' ' 0 /' Jean
P r ournay * Pont Hebert
Le Hommet e
Bauleroy
Le Mesni! Durand 0
5T LO La Boulaye
,,:..rr- aumont
COUTA NCE
Torigni
10 Villebaudon .
STATUTE MILES y.
WIWA-tE /AV1ERCANS ADVANCE-Arrows locate American drives in-
Cluding an advance to Beauvais in the push toward Lessay and the
cpture tof Le Hlommet on the front between Lessay and St. Lo. Heavy
black hine is approximate battle front.
ROMMEL INCREASES FORCES:
Delay of Normandy Offensive
-May Strengthen Nazi Position

U.S. Bombers
Blast Ploesti
Oil Refineries
LONDON, July 15-()-Five oil
refineries and a pumping station at
Ploesti were blasted today by 750
U. S. heavy bombers flying from the
Mediterranean but the worst weather
since D-Day frustrated Allied air
forces straining to get back into the
battle over the Normandy.
Columns of smoke 20,000 feet high
towered over the Romanian oil cen-
ter and crews looking back on their
handiwcrk said the smoke was visible
for more than 100 miles.
Escorting Mustangs downed a
number of enemy fighters who chal-
knged the big armada.
Supreme headquarters said the
weather over France was so bad that
it would go down in invasion history
as the worst ever. Less than 50
sorties had been flown by noon and
these were routine photo, reconnais-
sance and patrol sweeps.
The Germans took advantage of
the impasse and sent more flying
bombs over southern England, in-
flicting a number of casualties and
wrecking buildings.
BUY WAR BONDS -

death of U.S.
Airmen Told
By Japanese
By the Associated Press
A Japanese propaganda broadcast
from Singapore to American forces
in the southwest Pacific said yester-
day that an unstated number of U.S.
airmen from Superfortresses which
raided Japan had "bailed out to meet
with the same fate which was meted
out to the raiders of Tokyo some two
years ago."
In the 1942 raid, eight fliers were
believed to have been captured, of
which "some" were executed and
"some" were given commutations, ac-
cording to an announcement by
President Roosevelt a year after the
raid.
Today's broadcast, which was not
paralleled by any other Japanese
radio, came at an hour when the
Singapore radio often releases propa-
ganda designed to frighten or dis-
courage American and Australian
forces, said monitors of the Federal
Communications Commission, who
recorded it.N C
SI NV EST I N V ICTORY

WHERE RUSSIANS CONTINUE RAPID ADVANCES-Arrows locate
Red Army advances including the capture of Daugai and Novaya
Ruda in a thrust nearing East Prussia. The Russians also captured
formerly encircled Wilno (A) and Pinsk (B) Shaded area is German-
held.

e

pending doom to be read into them, gotten that German collapse in the
Yet to what extent they also reflect first World War began at home,
a rising tide of public despair in not at the front. And it is from the
Germany as the walls of Hitler's home front that the air waves now
Fortress Europe crumble under Rus- are carrying dark-hued pictures of
sian-Allied pressure can only be con- thesituationthat hint at wavering
jectured. public morale that only the rigid
There is no warrant yet to believe repression of Nazi police measures
that the German army has lost its may be holding in check.
will or ability to fight on. The toll Time Will Tell
of unwounded prisoners taken by Time alone will tell the real situa-
Russians and Allies alike runs high; tion in Germany. In his recent
but if any substantial number have warning to the people of the Anglo-
surrendered voluntarily while still American home fronts against over
there was chance of escape it has not optimism General Eisenhower was
appeared in official or unofficial re- careful not to dismiss the possibility
ports from the battle theaters. of internal collapse in Germany en-
Foe Is Courageous tirely; but he made it clear that
On the contrary, General Mont- Allied war plans were based on ex-
gomery, field commander of the Al- pectation that German armies would
lied invasion army in France, has fiht to the bitter end. There is no
noted with admiration the courage sugestion from Moscow of any
and skill with which the foe has other expectation in Russia.
fought it out against ever increasing Under the relentless pressure of
odds in Normandy. Fast-paced as both the Russian and Allied atacks,
the Russian advance has been to some revision of German dispositions
bring the distant muttering of the to mheet the ripening military crisis
guns to ears in the German home- is to be expected soon. It may be
land itself when the east wind blows, for that, to prepare the Nazi home
there is yet no evidence of a German front for "disenagement" retreats
rout or lack of the will in German on both fronts, that the Berlin radio
ranks to stand and die when ordered. has drawn so somber a picture for
Nevertheless, it can never be for- German ears this week end.
N \R.E G\ULARLY\?
OUR STATIONERY SHELVES "
HAVE JUST BEEN RESTOCKED
WITH NEW PAPERS, COLORED AND
%i WHITE WITH HEAVY AND
AIR MAIL WEIGHTS. USE V-MAIL
WHEN PRACTICAL
7'
f/
U-JiqHR S BOOKSTORE
316 South State Street

Executions o
French Patriot
Army 'I1legaI
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS AL-
LIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE,
July 15-UP)-Gen. Dwight D. Eisen-
hower warned the Germans today
that the French forces of the inter-
ior were a regular part of his Allied
forces and that steps already were
being taken to bring to justice the
Nazis who have been illegally execut-
ing members of this patriot army.
The FFI, Frenchmen fighting be-
hind the German lines for the libera-
tion of their homeland, are a regu-
larly constituted military force,
Eisenhower pointed out, and are en-
titled to the protection of interna-
tional law and usage covering com-
batants.
The Germans have been treating
them as "Francs-Tireurs," civilian
irregulars who may be shot when
caught.
In an official statement, Eisen-
hower said the French fighting in-
side France "constitute a combatant
force, commanded and directed by
Gen. Joseph Pierre Koenig, and
forming an integral part of the Al-
lied Expeditionary Force." Their
numbers have been estimated as high
as 500,000.
They are bearing arms openly and
are operating against the Germans
in accordance with the rules of war,
Eisenhower said, noting that "they
are provided with a distinctive em-
blem and are regarded by General
Eisenhower as an army under his
command." The emblem is a tri-
color arm band bearing the cross of
Lorraine.
His statement concluded :
"Thetsupreme commander is de-
termined that every effort shall be
made to trace the authors of any
atrocities committed against mem-
bers of the forces underdhis com-
mand. Steps to this end are al-
ready being taken. The guilty will
be brought to swift justice.''
Eisenhower did not disclose the
evidence he already had against the
Germans.

1 ,

'-- " i

SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, AL-
LIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE,
July 15.-UP)--Allied delay in laun-
ching a big offensive to break out of
the Normandy beachhead threatens
to put the Germans into the strong-
est defensive positions they have held
since D-Day, in the opinion of many
British and -American observers of
the French campaign.
Despite the capture of Caen, the
fact remains that Gen. Sir Bernard
L. Montgomery's forces on the east-
ern wing of the bridgehead today-
40 days since the invasion began-
hold less territory than they did six
days after D-Day when they reached
Villers-Bocage.
Early in the invasion, Allied air
forces had roads and bridges leading
to the beachhead so badly damaged
that Field Marshal Erwin Rommel
could gather only pieces of divisions
to plug the gaps.
Nazi Forces Increased
He has been outnumbered on the
front since the first day of invasion,
but because of bad weather and the
fact that air attack cannot complete-
ly halt the flow of troops and supplies
Rommel has been able to increase his
forces steadily.
* *
DViSions Are
Normandv '
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, AL-
LIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE,
July 15.-UP)-Twenty to 25 German
divisions, most of them crack guards
and armored units, are now ranged
against the Allies in Normandy, com-
paredswith only seven who met the
first shock of the invasion, it was
disclosed tonight.
Eleven to 12 of these divisions, it
was estimated, are confronting the
Americans.
Although two of the original divi-
sions have disappeared entirely-
wiped out in the fighting-German
Field Marshal Gen. Guenther von
Kluge was reported now to have
under his command 60 to 65 divisions
for the defense of western Europe, up
to five more than were allotted his
predecessor, Field Marshal Gen. Karl
von Rundstedt.
Divisions Were Scattered
When the Allies stormed ashore on
June 6, they found the Normandy
coast defended by about one German
division to each 20 miles.
The Allies poured in seven divi-
sions, and were faced by an equal
number of Germans, but it was the
following day before the Nazis were
able to mount a counterattack with
anything more than infantry and the
elements of a single armored division.
CLA 1 ]E1
u inA SI crf

The Allies have not yet launched
a coordinated large scale attack all
along the bridgehead. When the
Americans were taking Cherbourg,
the British and Canadians were on
the defensive around Caen. When
the British and Canadians took Caen
the Americans were busy regrouping
after Cherbourg and were engaged
in only limited activity.
Lt.-Gen. Omar N. Bradley's troops
now are engaged in the widest spread
offensive operation to date. It covers
40 miles of front down the Cherbourg
Peninsula, but by the nature of the
terrain the Germans retreating into
ever-stronger positions as long as
the Caen sector remains the same.
Time Is Factor
Gen. Montgomery in his campaigns
has been famous for taking unlimited
time to gather everything he wants
before the big attack, and his record
of never having lost a battle stands
in his favor.
He is gathering everything possible
into his narrow bridgehead now, but
further delays will -give Rommel a
chance to bring up more reserves.
An air force officer in Normandy,
lunching with the ground command,
recalled the days when the air forces
were criticized for not giving troops
enough support and jokingly said:
"The trouble with this campaign
is that the air forces are not getting
enough ground support."

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