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July 14, 1944 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Roosevelt Tells
Of More Bribes
In Senate Trial
Ex-Senator Speaks
Of Hotel Graft Center
By the Associated Press
MASON, MICH., July 13-Former
state senator Joseph C. Roosevelt,
errand boy, bartender and aide to
Maj. Charles F. Hemans' admitted
bribery of Michigan law-makers, to-
day added new details to Hemans'
testimony as the legislative graft
trial neared the end of its fifth week.
Roosevelt testified that he, too,
had been paid a bribe by Hemans
while he was a member of the 1937
legislature.sHe testified, also, that
he knew that an envelope of cash
which he said he delivered to Senator
Jerry T. Logie was bribe money and
declared he had neither been in-
dicted for participating in a felony
nor had been granted immunity from
prosecution.
Recounting details, of the hotel
room headquarters which Hemans
operated for his lobbying activities,
Roosevelt testified he had person-
ally placed bribe money in the hands
of six of the legislator defendants.
Eighteen of them came to Hemans'
rooms at one time or another, he
said, eight of them having gone once
or more times with Hemans into the
adjoining bathroom in which He-
mans testified he often paid bribes.
The witness said that he paid for-
mer state senator Ernest G. Nagel
of Detroit between $50 and $75 and
obtained for him a new overcoat
which Hemans paid for.
He denied a ,aefense attorney's
question as to whether he had con-
tacted legislators about introducing
a bill legalizing slot machines.

CHINESE CIVILIZATION:
Shih Chia Chu Lectures On
Post-War Reconciliation Plan

Stressing the great need for under-
standing between the Chinese and
the various races which have infil-'
trated into China, Shih Chia Chu
gave the first in his series of lectures
on "Chinese Civilization" yesterday
afternoon in the Rackham amphi-
theatre.
"Effort should be made by the
Chinese in the near future to make
reconciliation with the Aborigines, in
particular, and to provide better
treatment of these people," said Chu,
adding that equal opportunities in
education would be one main stop to
foster a better relationship.
In order to present background
material for his future lectures, Chu
devoted most of yesterday's lecture
to the impact of other races upon the
course of Chinese history. Begin-
ning with the migration of the Turks,
or Huns as they became known to the
Chinese, into North China after the
first century, A.D., he went on to
describe the movements of Hindus,
Persians, Arabs, Sogdians, and Jews
into that country, of which the latter
Price To Give
Carillon Recital
Percival Price will present a caril-
Ion recital in commemoration of
Bastille Day at 7 p.m. today with a
group of 12 compositions.
Mozart's "Minuet" from "Don Gio-
vanni" and "March" from "Figaro"
will open the concert. "The Storm"
from Verdi's "Il Trovatore" and the
"Polka" from "Schwanda" will also
be among the operatic selections.
Compositions written for the caril-
lon will include "Etude" by Menotti,
"Reverie" by Giles and "Fantaisie
No. Three" by Price.

group settled at Kaifeng as early as
the ninth century, A.D.
Other influences in Chinese civili-
zation were the Tunhu, Tibetans,
Mongols and Aborigines, which still
present a difficult problem for China.
Chu, a native Chinese, is repre-
sentative of that country's younger
generation. Born near Shanghai, he
received all of his education in China
before coming to the United States
in 1939. At present, he is on the Ori-
ental Staff of the -Library of Con-
gress. His next lecture will be at
4:10 p.m., Thursday, in the same
place.
Outside Dancing
Parties Planned
Wooden Pavillion To
Be Built in Palmer Field
Plans are now underway for out-
door dancing parties during the sum-
mer months, accord-ing to Bill Lay-
ton, leader of the campus orchestra.
Although all arrangements have
not been completed, Layton indicated
that plans will be finished soon to
permit the first outdoor party to be
held next week-end.
Under the program now being dis-
cussed, a special dance pavillion with
wood floor and surrounded by tables
would be constructe'd in Palmer Field,
and dancing would be held there ev-
ery week-end, weather permitting.
This is probably the first time such
a program has been introduced on
campus and it will add Michigan to
the list of a few major colleges in
the nation with the same plan for
summer entertainment.
All Students Invited
To Chapel Dance
There will be a record dance to
which all servicemen and civilian
students are invited from 9 p.m. to
midnight tomorrow in the downstairs
clubroom of St. Mary's Chapel, ac-
cording to Dorothy Uhl, Grad., who
is in charge of the party.
Refreshments and table tennis will
be other features of the evening,
according to Miss Uhl.

Truman Will
Not Run" for
Vice-Presidency
By the Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, July 13-Senator
Truman (D-Mo.), in a statement to
the press late today declared he did
"not want the vice presidency", and
said he sincerely hoped the Missouri
delegation to the Democratic conven-
tion in Chicago next week would not
endorse him for that office.
Enjoys Senate Work
Senator Truman said he enjoyed
his work in the Senate and felt that
the committee he heads in the Sen-
ate investigating all war activity was
making a real contribution to the
war effort.
"It is difficult to make my friends
believe me when I say I do not want
the vice-presidency", the Missouri
Senator said. "But I am absolutely
honest in my often reiterated state-
ments that it is my personal prefer-
ence and desire to remain in the
senate. Frankly, I think I can be of
much more help in winning the war
continuing the work I have been
doing than I could possibly contrib-
ute as vice-president."
FDR Nominated by Acclamation
Nomination of President Roosevelt
by acclamation was predicted by the
Missouri Senator.
Senator Truman said the general
opinion in Washington when he left
was that President Roosevelt would
keep hands off the vice-presidential
nomination. The Senator added that
in addition to Vice President Wallace
there was much talk in the Senate at
least, of Senator Barkley of Kentucky
for the place.

I Highligohts
jb
On Ca pus..
Serv ices To Be held ..
Religious services, conducted in
Hebrew and English, will begin at
7:45 p. in., today, in the Hillel Foun-
dation. The service, which will last
about one hour, will be followed by a
social hour at which refreshments
will be served.
US()To Give Party .
A plantation party representing
"Yankees" and "Rebels" will be the
theme of the week-end USO dance
to be given from 8 p.m. to mid-
night tomorrow in the main USO,
at the corner of Huron and State.
Union Petitions Due *.
Petitions for Union vice-presidents
in the engineering, law and combined
schools will be due by 5 p.m. Monday
in the Student Office at the Union,
Thomas Bliska, Union president, an-
nounced.
Interviews will take place Tuesday
with the names of the nominees to
be announced in Thursday's Daily.
Petitions must contain the person's
name, school, phone number, ad-
dress, whether Navy, Marine or civil-
ian and eligibility.
* * *
Dance To Be field .
A regular Union week-end dance
featuring the music of Bill Layton
and his 15 piece orchestra will be
held from 9 p.m. to midnight to-
morrow in the main ballroom of
the Union.

-Associated Press Photo
MACKENZIE KING GREETS DE GAULLE--Prime Minister W. L.
Mackenzie King (left) of Canada shakes hand with Gen. Charles De-
Gaulle (right) on the latter's arrival in Ottawa from the U. S. where he
conferred with President Roosevelt in Washington.
JEEPS FOR PONIES:
Stage, Coach System of Old
West Reenacted m Ma rianas

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ef

When Breezes are soft
and skies are fair,
Steal an hour from study
and care
Ride away to the woodland
scene
ON A BICYCLE
RENTED
at the

By the Associated Press
SAIPAN, MARIANAS ISLANDS-
The stage-c ach days of the Old
West are being reenacted on the bul-
let-swept back roads of Saipan.
Only instead of cargoes of gold
dust, dry goods, and pay rolls,
Saipan's pony express carries
plasma, ammunition, water, ra-
tions-and surprisingly often, mail
right up to the front lines, along
with mimeographed copies of the
day's radio news.
Of course, the horse power has
been considerably stepped up. The
jeeps of Saipan have proved they can,
go anywhere a tank or tractor canj
go, and into dozens of places where
the terrain, the smell of dead bodies,
and the smoke of explosions would
stop a team of stage coach horses
in their tracks.

But the Japs make the old movie
thrillers come all too true. Jeeps
now' have mounted machine guns
and rocket guns. There is even a
mounted flame-thrower. Coming
through the narrow passes between
Saipan's hills the jeeps are open to
sniper and machine gun fire every
minute of their continuous daily
shuttling. The drivers come to know
the snipers by name: Two-Shot Tojo,
Gha-Cha Charlie, Mr. Five by Five.
Sometimes, when things get too
hot, they hop out like the old west-
ern drivers and barricade them-
selves behind their vehicles, shoot-
ing it out with the Japs slug for
slug.
And no jeep or truck in the first
two weeks on Saipan has been aban-
doned to enemy fire. They may have
had to detour, but the supplies, like
the pony express, always get through.

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D E cISION1~

The important new book
by Sumner Welles

-_---

Price:

$3.00 plus tax

CAMPUS BIKE SHOP

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

25c an Hour

1.00 all day

510 East William Street
OPEN EVENINGS AND SUNDAYS

DionS
'round the corner on State

JULY

(Continued from Page 2)
The First Open Clinic of the U. of
M. Fresh Air Camp will be held this
evening, Friday, July 14, at 8:30 p. m.
The location: Main Lodge, Fresh
Air Camp, Patterson Lake.
Consultant for this week will be
Dr. Howard McClusky.
William C. Morse
Russian Film. "Battle for Russia",
will be presented this evening and
tomorrow evening at 8:30, Rackham
Lecture Hall. Admission Free.
Dancing Class This Evening. We
know you want to learn to dance
so here is your chance. A new begin-
ners class will start today. And may
we say that at the end of six lessons
(not from Madam LaZonga) you will
really be able to give Fred Astaire
some comp tition. Classes are held
in the USO Ballroom from 7:00 to
8:00 p. m.
USO Bulletin, Friday Night Dance:
The Friday night dance will be held
as usual in the Ballroom from 8:00
to midnight You all know what fun
these dances are so need we say
more !
Exhibitions
Exhibitions, College of Architec-

I

ture and Design:
"Look at your Neighborhood";
circulated by Museum of Modern
Art; consisting of drawings, photo-
graphs, and plans illustrating hap-
hazard building and need for good
planning. South end of downstairs
corridor, Architecture Building.
Student work continued on dis-
play. Ground floor cases, Architec-
ture Building.
Open daily, 9 to 5, through July
30, except on Sunday. The public
is invited.
Clements Library: Association
books.
Rackham Galleries: Photographic
Exhibit: Labor and Industry in the
U.S.S.R.
Rackham Galleries: Photographic
Exhibit: Collective Farms in the
U.S.S.R. Open daily except Sunday,
2-5 and 7-10 p.m.
Michigan Historical Collections, 160
Rackham Building. The Growth of
the University of Michigan in Pic-
tures.
Legal Research Library: Fine buil-
dings by William C. Hollands. Lower
corridor cases.
Museums Building: Celluloid rep-
roductions of Michigan fish. Loaned
through the courtesy of the Institute
of Fisheries Research, Michigan De-
partment of Conservation.

Coming Events
Michigan Sailing Club: Members
please attend a meeting which will
be held at one o'clock in the Union,
on Saturday.
Russian Film. "Battle For Russia",
will be presented for the last time
tomorrow evening at 8:30, Rackham
Lecture Hall. Admission Free.
USO Bulletin of Coming Events:
Saturday, July 15, Saturday night
dance: The USO will have its Sat-
urday night dance as usual from
8:00 to midnight.
Attention! Wives of Servicemen:
Again let us say the USO Club is
open to you at all times. You are
always welcome.
Tours of Willow Run: Every Sun-
day tours of Willow Run leave the
USO at 1:00. The Red Cross Motor
Corps furnishes the transportation.
Best you sign up early for everyone
is anxious to see the Bomber Plant.
Play. "The Learned Ladies" by
Moliere will be presented Wednesday
through Saturday, July 19-22, by the
Michigan Repertory Players, at 8:30
p. m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets are on sale from 10:00 a. m.
to 8:30 p. m. each day except Sun-
day.

. . . Main Street . . . State Street . .

4J* her' t' he,
UNION DANCE
£2zaturdasj ligt~h

Corntinues with Greater Values for
Friday and Saturday
...at $5.95...
100 DRESSES of pastel and print jersey spun rayon, cot-
tons, crepes in plain print stripes. Sizes 9-17, 10-44,
161/2 to 241/2
Odds and Ends in Pastel
JACKETS, SLACKS and JUMPERS
...at $12.95...
Group of better DRESSES in print jersey, crepes and
sheers. Solid colors in pastel and dark.. Sizes 16%2-44,
161/2 to 24/2.
..at $17.50..
One group of SUITS, rayon flannel, silbreeze and strut-
ter in lovely pastels of brown, black and navy. Also pin
stripes and darker colors in wools. Sizes 9-20.
10 CHESTERFIELDS and CASUAL COATS
in red, blue and gold.
35. BETTER DRESSES in pastel and dark colors.

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CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

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CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion fof
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
HELP WANTED-MALE
MEN TO WASH DISHES for board,
Short hours and excellent food.

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COOL SHANTUNG SUITS
are perfect for these warm
summer days . . . they come
in delightful pastel shades
and n ill (%i7ps

I

and dance to the music of
BILL LAYTON
AND HI S ORCHESTRA
f e a t it r i n g
JUDY WARD.. .HERB EIDEMILLER
WHITEY BENSON ... AL TOWNSEND

i

6 KORET UG-A-LON

One g'oup of SKIRTS,
$3.98
wool plaids and solids.
Print jerseys, pastel and
spun rayons.

6 KORET JUG-A-LONG
JACKETS of cotton twill.
$2.98
6 SLACKS to match.
Odds and ends in other
JACKETS SLACKS
BLOUSES SKIRTS

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