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July 12, 1944 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-07-12

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DACE THREE

SAY, YULY 12, 1944

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AT, JULY 12, 1944 PAQE THREE

mompoNs"A

National

League

Hops

on

Highson

for

7-I

Win

Newhouser Clipped for
Three Runs, Three Hits
Four Tallies in Fifth Frame Sew Up Game;
Errors Give Nationals Two Unearned Runs

After failing to score out for four
innings, t he National League All-
Stars hopped on Tex Hughson, ace
Red Sox hurler, and managed to
send four runs across the plate, which
coupled with three runs in the sev-
enth and eighth innings, provided
Billy Southworth's nine with an easy
7-1 victory in the 12th annual All-
Star classic played last night in
Pittsburgh, before a near capacity
crowd of 30,000 fans.
The . junior loop jumped into an
early 1-0 lead as Hank Borowy, the
American League starting flinger,
singled Ken Keltner of the Indians
home with the initial run of the
game. The American Leaguers also
threatened in the first when George
McQuinn and Vern Stephens of the
Browns hit successive singles, but
Walters whiffed Boston's Bob John-
son for the third out.
Connie Ryan of the Braves started
oif the big fifth inning for the Na-
tional Leaguers with a single to cen-
ter. After Marty Marion fanned,
pinch-hitter Bill Nicholson came
through with a line double that

Keltner, Clev., 3b 4
loerr, Bos., 2b . .3
Hemsley, N.Y., c . .2
Hayes, Phil., e . .1
Borowy, N.Y., p ..1
Hughson, Bos., p. 1
Muncrief, St.L., p 0
Higgins, Dt., x . .1
Newhouser, Dt., p 0
Newsom, Phil., p 0
TOTALS ....,..32
x-Batted for Mu
NATIONALS AB
Galan, Chic.; if ..4
Cavarretta,Chi.,lb 2
Musial, St.L., cf rf 4
W.Cooper, St.L., c 5
Mueller, Cin., c . .0
Walker, Bkn., rf . .4
DiMaggio, Pitts.,cf 0
Elliott, Pitts., 3b 3
Kurowski, St.L.,3b 1
Ryan, Bos., 2b ..4
Marion, St.L., ss . 3
Walters, Cin., p . .0
Ott, N.Y., 2b z . .1
Raffensberger, p 0
Nicholson, Chic.,zz 1
Sewell, Pitts., p . .1
Medwick, N.Y. zzz 0
Tobin, Bos., p . .0
TOTALS.....33

1
0
0
0
0
0
0
a
0
1

1
0
0
1
0
9
0
0
6

0
4
2
3
0
0
1
0
0
0
24

41
I
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9

ncrief in 7th.

R
1
1
1
1
9
0
0
0
0
1
1 ,,
0
0
0
1
0'
0
0
7

H
1
2
1
2
0
2
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
12

O A1
2 0
12 0
2 1
5 2
0 0
0 0
0 ,0
0 3
0 1
4 4
2 3
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
27 15
third.
ger
8th.

Majors Approve
Increased Night
Game Schedule
Arc-Light Tilts Are
Expected to Bring
More Fans to Parks
PITTSBURGH, July 11-(AP)-
Major League baseball moved an-
other step nearer becoming a night
sport today when the National and
American Leagues approved addi-
tional arc light games for clubs de-
siring to take advantage of the
opportunity to draw more fans
through the turnstiles.
Meeting in a three-hour session,
after which 77-year-old Commission-
er K. M. Landis visibly showed the
effects of the intense heat, the
Leagues said any club could play
as many night games as desired, ex-
cept on Sunday, with the approval
of the visiting team. Only Wash-
ington, at present, plays all of its
week-day games under the lights.
Although none of the owners were
sure as to just what use they would
make of the ruling, President Sam.
Breadon of the St. Louis Cardinals
said the National League leaders
probably would play all of its re-
maining week-day games at night.
The St. Louis Browns, however, are
not expected to add more than a
dozen contests.
Officials of the Phillies, Athletics
and White Sox said they would add
more games but would not go all
the way. The Dodgers. Giants, Pi-
rates and Indians also may add a
few more night games.
The Major-minor League agree-
ment, due to expire Jan. 12, 1945,
was extended until Jan. 12, 1946 but
before becoming official must also
be approved by the Minor Leagues.
The Major League pact, under which
Landis has ruled baseball since 1921,
also expires Jan. 12, 1946

Musial, Doerr
Lead Hitters in

scored Ryan with the

Crisler

t
r

Gridders Light

Gives

tying run.

AMERICAN AB
Tucker, Chic., cf .4
Spence, Wash., rf 4
McQuinn, St.L., lb 4+
Stephens, St.L., ss 4
Johnson, Bos., if 3+

R
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
2
1
1
0

O
4
2
5
1
2

A
0
1
1
0
1

z-Batted for Walters in1
zz-Batted for Raffensberg
zzz-Batted for Sewell in

Twelfth Week Practice Drill
Former Stars Fall Head Coach Announces,
Below Earlier Mark Beginning of Contact
NEW YORK-(P)-The 12th week Work for Next Week
of the 1944 major loop baseball sea-
son goes into the record books as the By DAVE LOEWENBERG
week the leading hitters didn't hit- An easy workout was the order
and lost their leaderships of the day for the football squad
Thurman Tucker of the Chicago yesterday as all Marine and Navy
White Sox, who led the American trainees were taking their strength
just a week ago with a robust .375 tests which are given to them twice
average, collected only one hit in 31 during the semester.
times at bat-an average of .032 for Coach "Fritz" Crisler said that
the stretch-and his year's mark contact work would commence some-
skidded to .327, putting him in third time this week. weather permitting.
place. However, Crisler exclaimed that it
The same thing happened in the would have to get considerable cooler
National, where Brooklyn's Dixie in order to hold any scrimmages.
Walker, leader last week with .380, After the Navy men finished their
went hitless in 18 straight attempts strength tests, Crisler and his aides
and garnered only two bingles in 27 ran the team through a series of
trips-an .074 mark-to slip to sec- plays. Although no first string team
ond place with .352. of any kind has been formulated, a
Based on 200 Times at Bat tentative backfield combination of
NATIONAL LEAGUE Joe Ponsetto, Bob Wiese, Bill Wenz-
Player, Club AB H Pct. i lau and Bob Nussbaumer looked
.Musial, St. Louis .....284 104 .366 rather promising.
Walker, Brooklyn ...293 103 .352. Backfield Performers
Waleinrab, BrooklYork20910.335 Nussbaumer and Wenzlau were in
Weintraub, New York 209 70 .335 the tailback and wingback positions
Medwick, New York . . 255 85 .333 respectively. Ponsetto held down the
Hopp, St. Louis . .. .217 70 .323 quarterback spot and Captain Wiese
Galan, Brooklyn ....289 93 .322 performed in his familiar role as a
Hughes, Chicago . ... .239 77 .322 plunging fullback.
Ott, New York.......240 75 .313 When asked to comment on back-
Tipton, Cincinnati . .224 70 .313 field prospects, Coach Earl Martin-
Holmes, Boston ......319 99 .310 eau said, "there are a lot of boys I
Astill haven't met" but lihedid single
AMERICAN LEAGUE out several men who have looked
Doerr, Boston ......294 100 .340 fairly impressive. They are Ralph
Fox, Boston ........228 76 .333 Chubb a former Ann Arbor High
Tucker, Chicago ... .223 73 .327 School star, Eugene Derricotte a
R. Johnson, Boston ..239 76 .318 flashy all-stater from Defiance, Ohio
Siebert, Philadelphia 236 75 .318 and John Babyak a big six foot, 190
Hostetler, Detroit ... . 202 62 .307 pound line buster. There is a possi-
Moses, Chicago ......244 74 .303 bility that Babyak, because "of his
Stephens, St. Louis ..295 89 .302 weight, may be converted into a
Boudreau, Cleveland 296 89 .301 lineman.
Ends Singled Out
At the end positions, Coach Benny.
Oosterbaan singled out six candi-
dates deserving of special recogni-
A L BU LLET IN tion. Two ends from last year's
team, Art Renner and Bruce Hilkene,
are almost certain to see much action
this season. In the list of freshmen
end prospects, big 6 ft. 1 in. Dick
Events Toda yRifenburg, an All-Stater from Sagi-
nau, Michigan, looks very promising.
Women in education and Pi Lamb- The other three ends are Sheldon
da Theta will hold a joint meeting Kavieff, a reserve on last year's team,
George Abbott, and Fred M. Matt-
tonight in the West Conference Ihaei.
Room at the Rackham building at Line Prospects
8:00 o'clock. A program and social Insofar as line prospects are con-
hour has been arranged. All women cerned, Coach Biggie Munn was also
in education are invited. quite hesitant about making any de-
finite committments. Munn com-
mented "that it is very difficult to
The Damask Cheek presented by make an accurate appraisal of a per-
the Michigan Repertory Players of son's ability unless you can observe
the Department of Speech opens him under fire."
tonight at 8:30 in the Lydia Mend- Those freshmen linemen mention
lessohn Theatre. The play will be ed were Chuck Wahl, an All-State
given for four performances only, center from Defiance, Ohio, and
tonight through Saturday night and Quentin Sickels, an All-State tackle
tickets are on sale daily at the Thea- from Benton Harbor, Michigan.
tre box office. Box office hours are Other yearlings singled out were
from 10:00 a. m. to 8:30 p. m. Morrin Shebel. Ed Schacki, Henry
Milczuk, and Roger Chiaverini.
Registration: The University Bu-

Iiakit9 the t$$aft4
By HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor
In recent heralded golf matches all over the country, the names of
Byron Nelson and "Jug" McSpaden could be found on most of the playing
lists,
Nelson and McSpaden, rejected for military duty, are keeping their
clubs in fine trim by performing on behalf of the various war efforts to raise
money whenever and as often as they can.
In three recent exhibition matches, Nelson and Jug raised nearly
$1,000,000 for war relief, and are at present on a tour that will net many
more millions into the fold.
McSpaden so far has one of the greatest winning streaks in the history
of tournament golf, placing in the chips in fourteen out of fifteen events in
which he participated. He missed only in the first Chicago Victory National
at Beverly last August.
In this course of time, Jug has captured the Tam Open, the Los
Angeles, Crosby-Hope, Phoenix and Golfport Opens and the world's
championship encounter at Tam O'Shanter. McSpaden has finished
second on three occasions, third once, and fourth, fifth and sixth once
apiece.
These two experts began their tour at St. Bonaventure College in Little
Olean, N.Y., and in their first appearance, they managed to raise $100,000.
The following match was played in Rochester where the fans bought
$800,000 in war bonds and two spectators payed the astounding price of
$42,000 merely for the privilege of caddying for the day.
To show that their fine sportsmanship, and the great cause which they
are trying to promote has not gone unnoticed, these masters of the greens
played before the largest crowd ever to witness a golf match in the Highland
city course in Indianapolis.
Nelson and McSpaden again began their tour at Omaha today, here
mixing their exhibition matches with tournaments, as they performed
superbly to come out on top again, playing before a children's hospital.
From here this duo will head west to compete in various meets, finally
performing in the All-American Open at Tam O'Shanter.
In present times, with most of the star performers in some service or
other, many athletes that are rejected sink their chins down on their chests
and feel self-conscious and down in the dumps beoause they can't join their
comrades in arms.
This kind of an attitude would never solve any problems, and chances
are that in their present states of mind, not only would they be useless to
themselves, but to the war effort, from whence this feeling could originally
be traced.
It is men like Lord Byron and Jug, who have the courage to accept
their fate, and without bemoaning everything that they can think of for
their dilemma, they pulled their clubs out of hock and did the best thing
that they knew how.
And Agardless of what these men think of their chosen tasks, I'll
venture to 'say that the money which is being accumulated by their per-
formances, will go much farther to aid their cause than if they had actually
donned a service uniform.

1

Notre Dame and
Purdue Begin
grid .Practices
INDIANAPOLIS, July 11-(AP)-
Upon a pair of fledgling coaches, each
making his first start as a college
football chief-of-staff, and four let-
termen will fall the task this season
of bringing Notre Dame and Purdue
back for an encore in the collegiate
grid limelight they focused on Indi-.
ana last year.
Such, at least, was the situation as
Purdue began summer drills yes-
terday and Notre Dame prepared to
open a three-week session July 17.
At Notre Dame, the 1943 mythical
national champions will rely on
coach Ed McKeever, backfield assist-
ant to Frank Leahy last fall and who
advanced to the command after
Leahy entered the Navy this spring,
and semi-veterans Bob Kelly and
George Sullivan. Kelly, a naval
trainee, became eligible midway in
the 1943 campaign and saw exten-
sive service athalfback.aSullivan
played with the shock-troops as a
tackle.
Cecil Isbell, another backfield
boss moved into the driver's seat this
year by the resignation of Elmer
Burnham, will direct Purdue's bill
to retain the Western Conference
title it shared with Michigan's Wol-
verines last season.
Isbell will be aided by only Boris
Dimancheff, halfback, and Frank
Bauman, end, from the unbeaten
1943 machine. The rest of the squad
will be composed of an undeter-
mined number of Navy and Marine
gridders.

Major League
Standigs
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W L
St. Louis ........42 34
Boston .........42 36
New York .......39 35
Washington . ...38 39
Chicago ........34 37
Cleveland .......37 41
Detroit .........36 42
Philadelphia ... .35 42
Games behind leader.

Pet. *GB
.570
.538 21/
.527 31/2
.494 6
.479 7
.474 71/
.462 8%/
.455 9

DAILY OFFICI,

NATIONAL L
W
St. Louis.......52
Pittsburgh......39
Cincinnati ......42
New York .......37
Philadelphia ....32
Brooklyn .......33
Chicago ........29
Boston ..........30

LEAGUE

L
21
30
33
39
41
43
40
46

Pet.
.708
.565
.560
.487
.438
.434
.420
.395

*GB
10
101/
16
19
20
201/
23

(Continued from Page 2)
14, 9:00 a. m., in Room 2051 Natural
Science Bldg.
Engineering Aptitude Tests: All
First - Term civilian Engineering
Freshmen and First-Term Navy V-12
students in Curriculum 101 will meet
in Rackham Lecture Hall at 8 o'clock
a.m. on July 12 for the purpose of
taking .the Engineering Aptitude
Tests developed by the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of
Teaching. This exercise has been
approved by the Commanding Offi-
cer, Navy V-12 Program.

i
I
7
1
1
i

Sphinx to Meet Today
There will be a Sphinx meeting
at 7 p. m. today in the lounge of
the West Quadrangle, treasurer
Bob Nussbaumer announced.

TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT And
OFTi'ICF SUPPLIES
0.1. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 6615

kumea"

i

*.Games behind leader.
Son of White Sox Owner
Enters Armed Forces
CHICAGO-()-Charles A. Co-
miskey, II, who in 1947 will become
owner of the Chicago White Sox
baseball club, today was to complete
his preinduction examinations for
military service.
The 18-year-old son of Mrs. Grace
Comiskey, club president, who was a
June graduate of St. Thomas Acad-
emy in St. Paul, has indicated a
preference for the Navy.

Seminar
will meet
week Prof.
A. H.).

in Theory of Numbers
Wednesdays, at 3. This
Rainich will speak (3201

Seminar in Applied
will meet Wednesdays
West Eng. Bldg. This
H. Brothers will speak.

Mathematics
at 4:30, 318
week Mr. W.

14
What an a:
A strictly"
Watch our

MADE-TO-ORDER
FACE POWD E R
INTRODUCTORY BOX
FOR ONLY
rt! Such a difference on your skin.
made-to-order" powder for YOU.
consultant blending. She can cater

Concerts'
Mr. Frederick Marriott, Organist
and Carillonneur of the University of
Chicago will play a group of compo-
sitions on the Charles Baird Carillon
in the Burton Memorial Tower at
7:15 this evening.
Faculty Recital: Gilbert Ross, vi-
olinist, and Mabel Ross Rhead,
pianist, members of the faculty of
the School ofrMusic, will present the
first in a series of three Thursday
evening programs at 8:30, July 13,
in the Assembly Hall of the Rack-
ham Building.
The programs will be devoted to
the music of Mozart and Beethoven,
and will be open to the public with-
out charge.

reau of Appointments and Occupa-
tional Information will hold its an-
nual summer registration for alll
those wishing to register for per-
manent positions in both the Teach-
ing and General Divisions of the
Bureau. Those desiring to register
for the first time as well as those
wishing to bring their records up-to-
date are urged to be present.
The time: Today, Wednesday, July
12th at 4:15 p. m.
The place: 205 Masona Hall.
Signed.,
University Bureau of
Appointments and
Occupational Information

Williams Wins Fight
WASHINGTON, July 11.- (P)-
Holman Williams, Detroit veteran,
outpointed Lloyd Marshall, Cleve-
land light-heavyweight, in a slow,
10-round bout before 3,000 fans to-
night. Williams weighed 155, Mar-
shall 164.
- - - -

rer ectioa)it tmodern

f
Sox of every kind and descrip-
tion: cottons, lisles, white-
pastels, red, brown, navy,
black, argyles, from 39c.

Designed for fun in the
sun The gob shorts from
$4.00.
The striped cotton
basque shirt is $2.00
1 Extra special group at
$1.49

Ending Today

French
the Grill
League.

Tea today at 4 p. m. in
Room of the Michigan

II

Last Day
CARY GRANT
"Once Upon a Time"
Continuous COOL
from 1 P.M.1...O

Charles E. Koella
b (Continued on Page 4)
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY'

;'I
41WLt

Corning Thursday
It's love...Ige ,,f o

CLASSIFIED
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Contract Rates on Request I

0

4
f
Don't relax
BUY WAR

I

Lest you forget our July Clearance of
Coats, Suits, Dresses. Gives you mar
velous values to wear now, for Fall and

IA' .* ~ ~

I ~ *~**~

ii

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