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August 18, 1944 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-08-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

!AG

_.__ ,. ,_ . __ zAG ThRE _

nelson Defeat's
Fry To Advance
In Tournament
Byrd, Wood Beaten as
McSpaden Is Victor
SPOKANE. Wash., Aug. 17.-(.P)-
While the two tournament hotshots
breezed through to easy victories, two
other name players were tumbled out
of competition today to provide the
upsets of second round matches of
the 1944 National P.G.A. golf cham-
pionship.
Byron Nelson, Toledo, O., and Har-
old McSpaden, Philadelphia, raced
through their 36-hole matches, the
former walloping Mark Fry, Oak-
land, 7 and 6, and McSpaden taking
the measure of Fred Annon, Mam-
aroneck, N.Y., 8 and 7.
Their wins were expected, there-
fore it was just so much routine, but
the dunping of duration U.S. Open
champion Craig Wood of Mamaron--
eck and Sam Byrd, of Detroit, Mich.,
furnished the thrills for a gallery
that numbered more than three
thousand fans.
Art Bell, lanky San Francisco
power hitter, ousted Wood by a 3 and
2 count. It was no more surprising
than the 2 and 1 win posted for.
Charles Congdon, Tacoma, Wash.,
over Byrd, the ex-New York Yankee
outfielder. Byrd and Wood, inciden-
tally, are the third and fourth high-
est money winners for the year;' trail-
ing McSpadennand Nelson.
Nelson fired his fourth consecutive
69, against the par .72 Manito course
in his morning round with Fry, yet
held only a 1-up lead because of his
rival's 71.
The Oaklander had a blow-up,
which included a streak of hooked
drives, on the third nine when Nelson
built upt a five-hole margin,. Mc-
Spaden ran away from Annon with
a 4-up lead at the 9th; 5-up 18th
with 70 shots and 7 up at the 27th.

I.., . .r: .. . .. 1.

tNak the /''u40
By HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

Will a New P.G.A. Golf Champ Be Crowned?

W

l
DOWN THROUGH the years, there have been various debates by coaches,
players, and others as to which sport does more for building the body
of an athlete. Since the beginning of the war, this question' has changed
slightly and is now viewed with the idea of which sport is the best condi-
tioner for military service.
Many authorities claim that the body contact presented in football
makes that sport the best preparation for service men. However, W. H.
(Billy) Thom, veteran Indiana University and former Olympic match coach,
differs in his opinion, and states that wrestling will do more for condition-
ing and preparation for actual combat than will any other sport.
"The wrestler is on his own and so is the soldier or Marine in the
hand to hand fighting we have seen in the Pacific and in Italy and
as we shall see in future invasions," stated Coach Thom, who in six-
teen years at Indiana University has produced 26 Western Conference
and'12 National intercollegiate individual wrestling champions.
[AVING participated in both sports and taking full use of my preroga-
tive, this scribe would also cast his lot with Coach Thom, and in this
respect, go against the critics.
Once a boy goes in for wrestling, he is given a chance for self-expression,
and when he enters a wrestling match the final outcome is his sole respon-
sibility. He makes his decisions as an individual, and his whole battle is
fought on his own intelligence and initiative. Taking into cognizance
all reports which have emanated from the various battlefronts, these same
elements have meant either life or death for our fighting men when they
came into contact with the enemy.
A lot of people have had the idea that wrestlers are thugs and very
crude. Where this expression and! description of a wrestler originated,
I can easily guess, but it is not the professional ranks of this sport that
I uphold. If these very same people formulate opinions of intercollegi-
ate wrestling with this prejudice in mind, then they should be consis-
tent and judge all other sports the same way; for the "grunt and
groan" man is- the same as any other college student on any specific
athletic team.
JN RECENT years, there has been an increased interest in wrestling, not
only from the point of view of the spectators, but also many of the
students in the different P. E. M. classes have asked to go out for the team.
But the recent actions of Athletic Director H. O. "Fritz" Crisler, who,
in a sudden move to reduce the athletic budget, dismissed Ray Courtright,
wrestling mentor, brought many speculations that wrestling would be
dropped, as was hockey.
However, Coach Crisler has promised that as long as any other Big
Ten school has wrestling, Michigan will have a team to compete. And it
is my fervent belief and hope that in
these times when individual initia-
tive and self-expression is needed
more than ever, that a sport which
does more to promote these ele-
ments than any other, is not ban-
ned from the athletic program.

By WHITNEY MARTIN this year is a little on the synthetic
Associated Press Correspondent i1order originated with Duke Ridgley,
NEW YORK, Aug. 17.-They will who writes a sprightly column in the
crown a new P.G.A. champion at Huntington, W.Va., Herald-Dispatch.
Spokane Sunday. Or will they? Duke has more than a gabbing inter-
They will if they can conveniently est in the status of the winner of the
forget the P.G.A. already has a current tournament, as he was the
champion, prevented by duty in the first "we want Sam Snead" man, and
armed service, or at least by an in- Sam Snead, now in the Navy, won
jury connected with that duty, from the last P.G.A. tournament played.'
defending his title. And winning a Duke has much logic to back his
title without defeating a defending argument that the winner of the
champion always leaves the crown durrent tournament will be a stand-
with a rather tinny sound. in champion at best, although prob-
The idea that the championship ably the world's highest paid stand-

in. He stands to make a few thous-
and out of the tourney proper, and
maybe some thousands more through
the by-products of his victory, al-
though the by-product business isn't
quite as brisk as it was in the lush
days before the war.
Anyway, Duke says that, because
Joe Louis is in the service and unable
to do anything about it, doesn't mean
a couple of stumble bums could stage
a fight with the winner crowning
himself champion.
Not that the field in the .Spokane
tournament is made up of golf stum-

ble bums. With maybe three or four
notable exceptions, it probably is as
good a field as the meet ever had.
But the fact remains, the defending
champion isn't there to protect his
crown. If he was absent through
choice that would be different, but
Snead has no choice in the matter.
Snead won the 1942 tournament at
Atlantic City. This was his first vic-
tory in a national tournament, al-
though he is rated by many as the
best played living. He came within a
whisper of winnhig the National
Open at Philadelphia in 1939.

SWEATERS are TOPS
in back-to-school wardrobes
eind GOODYEAR'S Sporty Shop
has them!

....----

\
o of
s
i y ayr
D
. $k APPaIl t'T ' .

IZ OD O F
L ON D ON
It will never outgrow its
beauty and usefulness -
the easy, classic shirt - the
slim pared-down skirt. You'll
wear it wherever-whenever
throughout the day. Izod
tailors it in pure wool and
soft angora and adds a trite'
pigskin belt. Brown, green,
thistle; gold and blue.
Sizes 10-16. S15

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

5 {
4'v
w
2 ~ ::c.~-
t }~~~~
_Y

, ....
47 ;

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Here are sweaters to satisfy
all your special yearnings for
luscious-looking colors, for fit
that's smooth. or boxy. In
weights to wear with skirts, un-

TEAMS W
*St. Louis ......80
Pittsburgh ......63
Cincinnati ......61
Chicago ........49
*New York ......50
Boston .........44
Philadelphia ... .42
Brooklyn .......44

L
28
45
46
56
61
66
64
67

Pct..
.741
.583
.570
.467
.450
.400
.396
.396

GB
171/
18%/
291/
362
37
371/

*Denotes night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 7-6 Philadelphia 6-5.
Boston 7, Chicago 5.
Brooklyn at Cincinnati, wet
grounds.
New York at St. Louis, night.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

nylon shortie, 5.00
Zephyr-light pullover, soft as silk
in this treasured yarn. Short of
sleeve, smooth-fitting at the
waist ... perfect suit companion.
White, yellow, powder, cherry,
pink. Sizes 34 to 40.
"ynubby knis"
pullover, 7.95
cardigan, 10.00
Newest of the classics but al-
ready one of the biggest favor-
ites! Knit in a nubby yarn that's
all pure wool and imported from
Scotland. Powder, pink, purple,
yellow, green, white. Sizes 34
to 40.
f uzz y-wuzy"
pullover, 5.00
Nice 'n long, 'n boxy. In a fleecy-
soft shetland-type yarn that al-
most purrs like a kitten! Lilac,
yellow, vanilla, white. Sizes 34
to 40.
campus classics
pullover, 3.95
cardigan, 5.00

der jackets, over shirts .. . just
come see!

SPORT SHOP

SPORTS SHOP-THIRD FLOOR
Also at the State St. Store

TEAM W
St. Louis........68
Boston..........60
DETROIT ......59
New York .......59
* Chicago .......53
Cleveland.......54
Philadelphia ....52
*Washington .... 47

L
46
52
52
52
59'
62
64
65

Pet.
.596
.536
.532
.532
.473
.466
.448
.420

GB
7
7
7
14
15
17
20,

~'
~ ~.' 4
*.. \
I

*Denotes night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
DETROIT 3, Boston 3 (called
end of five innings, rain).
St. Louis 10, Philadelphia 5.
New York 10, Cleveland 3.
Chicago at Washington, night.
Yanks Top Indians;
Lindell Ties Record
NEW YORK, Aug. 17.-(.T)- The
New York Yankees gained , their
fourth straight victory today, bump-
ing five Cleveland pitchers for 17
hits and an easy 10-3 victory over
the Indians.
Johnny Lindell was the Yankee
bellweather, lacing out five hits, in-
cluding four doubles, which tied a
major league record. The last player
to hit four doubles in a game was
Billy Werber, with the Cincinnati
Reds in 1940. Lindell also drove in
two runs to increase his total to 66.
Cleveland .. .100 101 000- 3 10 0
New York .. .212 101 12x-10 17 1
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY_
WANTED
R.N. OFFICER'S WIFE needs living
quarters for herself and young
daughter. Studio apt. or share
homework and expenses. Write
Marion Wade 246 Pingrie, Rt. 3,
Kalamazoo 83, Mich., or phone
Dean of Women, University.
LOST AND FOUND

',:
~ . *

.g
' r,

f.

"Must-haves" to pair up

for

s'

cold-weather or to wear separ-
ately. Fine hand-look knit in
100% wool shetland-type yarn.
Cherry, purple, pink, yellow.
Sizes 34 to 40.
sleeveless
pullover, 4.50
The sweater that gives you Fall's
favorite "jumper look." Slick
over shirts, just right for an extra
bit of warmth 'neath a jacket.
100% wool . green, cherry,
maize, pink.

I~

/

fi

skirts, too!
6.50 to 10.95
Lots of them to choose from here . . . to blend
with sweaters, pair with jackets. Monotone and
plaid tweeds, herringbone weaves, menswear flan-
nel. A rainbow array of autumn colorings. Straight-
cut, pleated, gored and demi-dirndl styles.

,rrr l7L U

.._. a

I I

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