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August 06, 1944 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-08-06

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.r3A.*5 NIVB

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAIG "3[

Tommy Shannon Leading in Michigan Open

All-America Boys Team,
T'o Play Charity Game
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK, Aug. 5-A drive for funds with which to build living
memorials for the country's heroes of World War II gets under way in the
Polo Grounds tomorrow with a baseball game in which pre-draft players
from east of the Mississippi River will play a similar team from the west.
Fourteen newspapers east of the river selected the outstanding young
player in their districts and the athletes were brought to New York by
Esquire Magazine, which is underwriting the event along with the Blue
network. The, western squad, also of 14, was chosen similarly.
Mel Ott, manager of the New YorkK-

PONTIAC, MICH., Aug. 5.-P_
The host pro, Tommy Shannon,
blazing around the first nine at
Orchard Lake Country Club in
31, four under par, kited to a 3.9
coming in and shared the early
lead today in the first round of
the Michigan Open Golf Champ-
ionship with Sam Byrd of Detroit
Plum Hollow, who put together a
34-36-70,, one under par.
Only half the first 50 players

who had completed the opening
day's 18 holes were under 80. Ed
Furgol, Detroit amateur. had 34-
37--71, one srtoke better than an-
o t h e r Detroit amateur. Chuck
Kocsis, a former champ, who post-
ed 36-36--72.
Al Watrous, defending champ-
ion from Oakland Hills, Detroit.
was among the leaders with 39-
34---73.

Other Scares Are:
Tommy Shannon, Orchard Lake,
31-39-70.
Sam Byrd, Detroit, 34-36-70.
*Ed Furgol, 34-37-71.
*Chuck Kocsis, Detroit, 36-36-72.-
Chick Rutan, Birmingham, 38-34-
72.
Al Watrous, Detroit, 39-34-73.
Al Kocsis, Pontiac, 36-37-73.
*-Amateur.

Giants, will guide the westeners
while Connie Mack, boss of the Phi-
ladelphia Athletics, will do the mas-
ter-minding for the Easteners. Dur-
ing the past week, Carl Hubbell of
'the Giants and Ira Thomas of the
A's, have been in charge of the re-
hearsals in the polo grounds.
Profits Turned Over
All net profits of the 3 p. m. game,
which will be preceded by a series of
theatrical acts,. will be turned over
to the newly formed living war me-
morials commission of the national
committee on physical f itness.
John kelly of Philadelphia, chair-
man of the physical fitness program,
said "that after the first world war
we honored our heroes with a monu-
ment or statue in a park on the town
square. This time let us perpetuate
their memory with a living memorial
--a swimming pool, a gymnasium or
an athletic field-which will benefit
future America."
"I never heard of a boy or girl get-
ting into trouble with the police if
their minds were occupied with im-
proving themselves in some sport,"
James J. Walker, former New York
City Mayor, told the players and
their friends upon their arrival.
Neither manager has yet an-
nounced his lineup or batting order.
Of the, players, Jimmy Enright of
St. Louis is the youngest. He was
15 on July 21 and hopes to see ac-
tion as a second baseman.

Gringrass Will
Be on Spartans.
Team This Fall
EAST LANSING, Aug. 5-W)-
Coach Charley Bachman's grin was
a little wider today as he announced
that Morgan Gingrass, fullback on
Michigan State College football
teams in 1941 and 1942, will be in
uniform this year to bolster thej
Spartans' squad of gridiron neoph-
ytes.
Gingrass, a Marquette High School
product, dropped out of college at
the end of his junior year, married
and has been working in a Lansing
war factory, He signed with the De-
troit Lions last year, but never play-
ed, Bachman said.
The return of Gingrass cheered
Bachman in his efforts to produce a
winning team out of a stable of 61
ex-servicemen, high school graduates
and 4-F's, few with college football
experience.
For opening scrimmage this week,
Bachman used Bob Brueger, Lans-
ing, at right half; Jack Breslin, Bat-
tle Creek, at fullback; Harold John-
son, Dubois, Pa. at left half; and
Chuck Peterson, Detroit, at quarter,-
back.

CHIEF BENDER AUTOGRAPHS A BASEBALL-Chief Bender, one-
time Philadelphia Athletics pitching star puts his name on a giant
baseball, erected on 10 foot baseball bats on a traffic island in front
of the Philadelphia, Pa., City Hall to mark Connie Mack's 50th anni-
versary as a Major League manager. The tripod will remain there
until after a Mack jubilee program at Shibe Park Friday night.
COMES THROUGH AGAIN:
Falkenburg Defeats Bartzen
For Junior SinglesNet Title

KALAMAZOO, MICY., Aug. 5--UP)
-Robert Falkenburg, brother of the
Hollywood movie star and cover girl,
Jinx Falkenburg, won the 29th an-
nual junior singles tennis title today,
defeating Bernard Bartzen of San.
Angelo, Tex., 0-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2, in
the tournament finals on the Kala-
mazoo college courts.
A furlough from the army air base
of Merced Field, Calif., enabled the
six foot-three inch Californian to
retain the junior crown he won last
year and to rack up his fourth na-
tional tennis title. He beat Seattle's
Jim Brink in straight sets in the
1943 tournament here and he was na-
tional boys champion in both 1940

and 1941, when the tournament was
held at Culver Military Academy.
Falkenburg took a set to figure out
his Texas opponent's style of play
today, failing to win a game. In
the ninth game of the second set he
broke through Bartzen's service and
went on to win 6-4. He virtually
duplicated that performance in the
third set and then added the 6-2
clincher.
Buddy Behrens, 15-year-old Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., lad, raced to a 6-2,
6-0, decision over MacDonald Ma-
they, also 15. of Princeton, N. J.
in the title match in the boys' divi-
sion.

/

(.
A

Major League Standings,..

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL l.EAGUE

..,

*St. Louis.....
Boston .........
New York ......
*Chicago ......
*Cleveland....
*DETROIT , ... .
Philadelphia.
Washington

W
.59
.54
. 51
.50
.51
.49
.47
.43

L
42
47
48
50
52
50
57
58

Pct.
.584
.535
.515
.500
.495
.495
.452
.426

GB
5
7
9
9
9
13
16

W
St. Louis .......71
Cincinnati ..... .55
Pittsburgh. ...... 50
Chicago .........46
*New York ......47
Boston ..........39
Brooklyn ........ 40
*Philadelphia ... 37

L
27
42
44
47
51
58
60
56,

Pet.
.725
.567
.532
.495
.480
.402
.400
.398

GB
151/2
19
222
24
31
311/2
32

t y
1/
n-* ..**~ '4**.*
e{
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*Does not include night games.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
DETROIT at Chicago, night.
Cleveland at St. Louis, night.
Philadelphia 2-2, New York 1-0.
Boston 6, Washington 2.

*Does not include night game.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 8, Boston 7.
Chicago 7, Pittsburgh 2.
Philadelphia at New York, night.
Only games scheduled.

!"-

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Rose Dean, Enac, Yankee Maid
Favorites in Hambleton Classic
GOSHEN, N. Y., Aug. 5-UP)--Rose Dean and Enac have moved along-
side Yankee Maid as favorites in the $42,000 Hambletonian following the
bay filly's defeat in a test for the trotting classic which returns, to good
time park Wednesday for its eighteenth running.
Eight other colts and fillies are likely contestants in the three-heat
affair for which Yankee Maid, owned by A. L. Derby of Wichita, has been
the odds on favorite since early spring.
Last Wednesday, however, the bay miss was beaten in two heats of
the Hambletonian test at Old Orchard Beach, Me., by Red Tower,
ineligible for the big race, and the sulky followers immediately hinted
that Yankee Maid would become a victim of one of the two jinxes which
have crept into trotting lore.
One jinx has kept a filly from winning the race since Shirley Hanover
turned the trick in 1937. The other has brought disaster to eight of the
pre-race favorites of previous years.
Yankee Maid, a daughter of Volomite and the top two-year-old last
year with a clocking of 2:04, twice equalled that time this season in
winning the Matron Stake at Cleveland and the National at Old Orchard.
Enac, bay colt by Scotland, dogged Yankee Maid in both her major
triumphs this year and was third behind Red Tower and the Wichita filly
in the test stake.
-. -d

U U U 6 U 6 U U U

3

- . . Clip Here And Mail To A U.-M. Man In The Armed Forces - - -

SERVICE
EDITION

"

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Ndmf

ANN ARBOR, MICH SUNDAY, JULY 3Q, 1944
I

ANN ARBOR., MICA

SUNDAY, JULY 30, 1944

___

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MAXWELL ANDER-
SON'S "Journey to Jerusa-
lem," an interpretation of
events during the time of
Caesar in the light of pres-
ent day dictatorship and
tyranny was presented by
the Michigan Repertory
Players of the Department
of Speech Wednesday
through Saturday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre. Mrs. Claribel Baird, a
member of the faculty of
the Oklahoma State Col-
lege for Women, directed
the production.
* * *
ANTI-JAPANESE PRE-
JUDICE which existed in
the United States, and
particularly on the West
Coast, before Dec. 7, 1942,
was primarily an econom-
ic and political problem
rather than a racial ques-
tion, Karl Akiya of the
Japanese language depart-
ment said in a lecture
sponsored by Inter-Racial
S. .......-. --Tr n-- - - - -of

WAVES RECRUITERS
were on campus three days
last week to interview Uni-
versity women in concur-
rence with a nation-wide
recruiting drive on the sec-
ond anniversary of the
WAVES. A particular
need for specialists 'be-
tween the agep of 23 and
30 was recently announc-
ed by the Detroit Bureau
of Naval Personnel. Spe-
cialists act as personnel
supervisors, physical edu-
cation instructors, secur-
ity supervisors and recrea-
tional supervisors.
* * *
THREE NEW DEPART-
XV VMt"I M1KA TYIMM warp

what it was at the out-
break of the war. During
the ceremony 58 graduates
were commissioned first
lieutenants by Lt. Col.
Reginald Miller of the
Judge Advocate General's
school.
* * *

C',,6vsfn fr!

GUESS WHO?-It's Walter Pidgeon at the right, but
who's the old party with him? Transformed by make-
up, it's none other than Greer Garson, heroine of
many a romantic film, playing the role of an 83-year-
old woman.'

i

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