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July 02, 1943 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1943-07-02

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PR1IPA.1-[=x LY 7; 191-

TilF- ICHICAN DAILL

PAGE Tk'F-ll

Senior Circuit
Has Edge in
All-Star Game
NEW YORK, July 1. -IP)- The
old guard will be mostly among the
missing when the National and
American league All-Stars tangle in
their 11th annual "dream game" at
Philadelphia Tuesday night, July 13.
Ten players who were on the.
squads selected by the fans for the
original game at Chicago in 1933 are
still on the active rosters of the maj -
or leagues, but only one, grizzled old
William Malcolm Dickey of the New
York Yankees, was chosen this time.
Still Playing
The other active alumni of that
first spectacle, are Joe Cronin, Al
Simmons, Rick Ferrell and Lefty
Gomez in the American League. and
Carl Hubbel, Paul Wagner, Lon War-.
heke, Dick Bartell and Chuck Klein
in the National.
This year the National League
squad has eleven players making
their first appearance in all-star
competition and the American
League eight. How many of them get
into the' fracas will be up to, the
managers, Joe McCarthy and Billy
Southworth, but it is likely that the.
fans at Shibe Park will see several,
since six of the "rookie" all-stars are
members of the world champion St.
Louis Cardinals.
Na tinal League Has Edge
The National League has an edge
in hitting this time, to reverse. the
the edge of most of the previous
games. Aside , from catchers the
American League managers namedl
only one .300 hitter, Vernon Stephens
of St. Louis. They passed over Oris
Hockett of Cleveland and Mike Hig-
gins and Dick Wakefield of Detroit,
three of the four top hitters in the
junior circuit.
No rookies were selected on either
squad, although John Lindell of the
Yankees, who was chosen, is a fresh-,
man outfielder, being converted this1
year from a pitcher.
In ignoring Hockett and Wakefield,
the American League pickedtan out-
field of Charley Keller, Chet Laabs,
George Case, Bob Johnson, Lindell
and Jeff Heath, Hockett's teammate
whose batting average for the Cleve-
land Indians is about .275, sixty
points less than Hockett's.
Higgins Crowded Out
Higgins apparently was crowded
out because the American League for
the second straight year will have
only one third baseman, Ken Keltner,
and three shortstops, Lou Boudreau,
Stephens and Luke Appling. Rudy
York and Dick Siebert at first base
and Joe Gordon and Bobby Doerr at
second were obvious choices to com-
plete the infield.

Golf Winner Is Surprise Champ

Wallace Ulrich (right), surprise sensation from Carleton College at
Northfield, Minn., receives congratulations from his finalist opponent,
Bill Roden (left) of the University of Texas, whom he defeated, 4 to 2,
to win the rational Collegiate Athletic Association golf title at the sub-
urban Chicago Olympia fields course.
A
NATION'S BASEBALL TODAY:

Detroit Tigers Take to 2

Win over ost
DETROIT, July 1.-(/P)-Ned Har-
ris' pinch single in the ninth inning
with ,the bases loaded gave the De-
troit Tigers a 3 to 2 victory over the
Boston Red Sox in a twilight game
today.
HFarris, batting for catcher Dixie
Parsons with the bases loaded and
none out, slapped Mike Ryba's first
pitch over shortstop to break up a
tie and give Paul (Dizzy) Trout his
seventh victory. The defeat was
charged to lefty Oscar Judd, his
fourth against seven victories.
Boston.......000 001 100-2 12 2
Detroit.......000 000 021-3 7 0
Judd, Ryba (9) and Partee; Trout
and Unser, Parsons (8).
PHILLIFS, PIRATES SPLIT'
PHILADELPHIA, July 1- ()-The
Pittsburgh Pirates took the second
game of a doubleheader from the
Phillies 2 to 1 on Bob Klinger's sev-
en-hit pitching today, after Shcool-
boy Rowe hurled a five hit 6 to 1
victory for the Phillies in the opener.
A crowd of 6,884 fans sat in.
Pittsburgh ... 000 000 010-1 5 5
Philadelphia . 100 011 21x-6 12 2
Podganiny, Brandt (8) and Baker;
Rowe and Livingston.

on Red Sox

"2 """"

| |

erpc m40,Mdr olt

NOW SHOWING!

!... ROMANCE!...FIJNI
PE Y MACDONALD
Marty May iff Edwards
Lorraine and Rognon
;BONA DRAKE
AND HER GIRL BAND
A Rsramunt, PiPue,,
Coming Sunday'
BETTY GRABLE
"Coney Island"

Pittsburgh ... 100 100 000-2 8 0
Philadelphia . 000 000 010-1 7 1
Klinger and Lopez; Gerheauser,
Dietz (9) and Livingston.
DODGERS BOW TO REDS
BROOKLYN, July 1. -(P)- The
Cincinnati Reds nosed out the Brook-
lyn Dodgers 1 to 9 today in a bois-
terous 12-inning struggle in which
36 players were used and 32 hits
were made.
The defeat cost the Dodgers a
chance tomove fractionally ahead
of the idle St. Louis Cardinals at
the top of the National League.
Cincinnati 020 401 100 002-10 19 0
Brooklyn 140 000 030 001- 9 13 2
Walter, Beggs ( 2) , Shoun (8).
Starr (10) and Mueller; Allen, Head
(4), Melton (7), Webber (9), New-
som (11) and Owen.
CUBS TRIP BRAVES
BOSTON, July 1.-(IP)-The Chi-
cago Cubs made it three in a row over
the Boston Braves today by beating
them 6 to 5. Four out of Boston's
five runs were unearned following
Eddie Stanky's three errors.
Chicago...... 201 200 100-6 12 3
Boston .......000 012 020-5 5 1
Derringer, Henyzewski (8), Bur-
rows (8), Wyse (9) and McCullough;
Barrett, Ferrell (6) and Poland,
Kluttz.
INDIANS 3, YANKEES 2
CLEVELAND, July 1. -(P)- The
New York Yankees gave away three
runs and a ball game to the Cleve-
land Indians today, 3 to 2, as rookie
Charley Wensloff continued to play
tag with hard luck.
New York ... 000 011 000-2 9 1
Cleveland ... 200 000 Olx-3 7 1
Wensloff and Hemsley, Sears;
Smith, Haymick (9), Heving (9) and
Rosar.
CHISOX BLANK SENATORS
Washington . 000 000 000-0 4 0
Chicago ......000 000 02x-2 9 2
Wynn and Early; Dietrich and
Tresh.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
CLASSIFIED
RATES
Nan-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of $.25 for each
additional 5 words.)
CotratRates on Request
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 30
S. State.
LOST-Phi Delta Theta fraternit
pin, Reward. Call E. J. Feltor,
24551.
BOARD BY WEEK 620 Forest Ave
Mrs. P. M. Keusch.

Swedish School
Teacher Runs
4:02.6 Mile
Arne Anderson Sets
New World Mark in
National Festival Meet
STOCKHOLM, July 1.- (P)-
Arne Anderson, 27-year-old school
teacher, ran the mile in 4:02.6 to-
day at the Swedish National Fes-
tival track meet at Goeteborg to
cut two seconds off Gundar
Haegg's recognized world mark of
4:04.6.
Anderson, known as the "flying
school teacher", often competed
against Haegg before the latter
came to the United States, but
never was able to win.
It was just a year ago that
Haegg, now in Chicago, set a
world mark of 4:06.2 for the Amer-
ican mile while competing in the
same national festival meet. Haegg
Slater was timed in 4:04.6, a feat
that started him on the road that
led to his presence in the United
States.
Patty Berg and
Dot Kirby Move
Into Golf Finals
CHICAGO, July 1.-(lP1)-Sports-
writer Dot Kirby of Atlanta, Ga., and
the gallant comebacker, Patty Berg,
of Minneapolis sht sub-par golf at
at Glen Oak today to dispose of their
olul dAouI pui slIeeA.I ugst a fulo
the 36-hole enampionship round of
the Women's Western Open.
The 23-year-old southern sharp
shooter, returning t the peak of her
game after making a name for her-
-elf with smashing successes in 1939,
was two under par in ceeating Dot
Germain, long-hitting Philadelphian,
3 and 1.
Patty, likewise, reached the best
form in her comeback campaign by
authorizing a 7 to 6 margin over Eng-
lish-born Catherine Fox of Glen
Ridge, N. J.
Rev. Scheips
Plans Sermons
Series Will Begin
Sunday .in League
A special series of sermons during
Summer Session for Christian stu-
dents will be given by the Rev. Al-
fred Scheips, pastor of the Lutheran
Student Chapel.
The series of talks which will be
given at 11 a.m. every Sunday morn-
ing at the Michigan League Chapel
will begin next Sunday with discus-
sion of "The Christian Youth and
His Nation."
Other topics in the series are as
follows: July 11, "The Christian
Youth and His Education"; July 18,
"The Christian Youth and His Mar-
riage"; July 25, "The Christian
Youth and His Friends"; August 1
"The Christian Youth and His Pos-
sessions"; August 8, "The Christian
Youth and His Future"; and Augus
15, "The Christian Youth and Hi
Church".
Girls Are Needed
For Ground Crews
Girls who are willing to work tw
consecutive hours any time durin

the day are urged to sign up for the
Women's Building and Ground crew
The crew will start work this week
end and will be paid sixty cents ai
hour. Helen Kressback, '44, and Mar-
ion Baskette, '44 of the Women's Wa
Council said. All those interested
should contact the Under-Graduat
Office in the League. They should
report for work at the Sub-Station
next to Waterman Gymnasium.
Rabbi Cohen To Lead
Hillel Services Today
Hillel summer services, which wi
be led by the Rabbi Jehudah M. Co-
hen, will begin at 7:45 p.m. today a
Hillel Foundation.
Student cantors for the servic+
will be Louis Singer and Elliot Or.
ganick.

I

Summer chairman Marcia Sharpe
urges all women on campus, includ-
ing graduates, to turn out for the
mass meeting, for JGP will be one of
the University's principal summer
activities. Besides special activities,
the'e will be three general fields of.
work sponsoring the sale of stamps
and bonds in campus houses, sale
from booths on campus, and posters,
writing and other types of publicity.
According to Pat Arnall, chairman
of house sales, her committee will

Calga

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Women Urged
To Sign Up for
Bandage Unit
Surgical Dressings
Group To Meet Each
Wednesday, Thursday
The Surgical Dressing Unit will
have its first meeting Wednesday
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the League
and will continue to be open every
Wednesday and Thursday in the
League for the summer session.
Every woman on campus and
those who are working in Ann Arbor
are urged to sign up at the Unit dur-
ing the opening week. For the first
two weeks the Unit will specialize in
teaching girls who will become new
instructors.
The instructors scheduled to be in
charge of the Unit on Wednesdays
and Thursdays are: Wednesday:
Jean Whittemore from 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. and Jean Caldwell from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m.; Thursday: Nancy Pottin-
ger from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Betty Car-
penter and Betty Jones from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m.
On the central committee are Bet-
ty Carpenter, attendance chairman;
Nancy Pottinger, equipment chair-
man; Jean Caldwell, packer; Betty
Jones, house chairman; and Jean
Whittemore, general 'and publicity
chairman. The Red Cross supervis-
ors who are assisting are Mrs. Jean
Hebrard and Mrs. S. A. Rodgers.

is

MASS MEETING WEDNESDAY FOR ALL WOMEN:

{A
ing
ing
ior
it
JGI
J'
but
sub
wel
for
can
Jul

A carnival on Palmer Field featur-
games, entertainment and danc-
will be the highlight of the Jun-
Girls' Project summer campaign,
was a'nnounced yesterday by the
P summer Central Committee.
July 31 is set as the tentative date,
plans are as yet indefinite and
ject to change.
A special carnival committee as
ll as regular JGP groups will be
ned at a mass meeting for all
npus women at 5 p.m. Wednesday,
y 7, in'the League.

1
I.s
Lt
g

I,

NEWS

have to contact all dormitories,
graduate and undergraduate houses
on campus and organize a campaign
for selling bonds and stamps and
maintain the sales throughout the,
term, setting a higher goal for the
semester than ever before. The com-
mittee wily sponoruf contests and vari-
ous types of stunts to keep the cam-
paign going.
The publicity committee will boost
stamp and bond sales through writ-
ing, art work, skits, and various pub-

licity media. Peggy Weiss, chairman,
urges anyone interested in newspaper
work, photography, speaking, and
any other type of entertainment to
sign up for the committee, for JGP
publicity work will. welcome a di-
versity- of talents and ideas.
There will be a sub-committee for
posters, headed by Georgianna Les-
lie. The committee is not exclusive for
art students or persons.with artistic
ability, but is open to anyone inter-
ested.

JGP Plans Outdoor Carnival

DO YOU D I G IT ?
Submifted by Jerry D. O'Brien

by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

1 ° '
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INSIDE WASHINGTON
...by DREW PEARSON

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OPINIONS... by SAMUEL GRAFTON
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Americans-to-be-executed.
Well, Hitler should be hopping mad at this year
Michidan IDaily - we've signed both of them
Der Fuehrer knows that Drew Pearson givesus
steady diet of inside, exclusive Washington news.
He breaks into a cold sweat whenever he sees f
Grafton column, slugging it out day after day with th
men and ideas that are this nation's enemies.
Th Daily's 2:15 A.M. deadline
brings you the latest Associated Press
war news in this area!}
$L50 for 8 ks_ SucC_.W

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MA Nil '1T1AN

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