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July 11, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-11

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SATURDAY, JULY 11, 1942

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Nelson Outlines
Auto Industry
Wartime Role
(Continued from Page 1)
honest pride, of course. Yet the bulk
of production of those two impor-
tant items came from new plants
started prior to Pearl Harbor. Fur-
thermore, by the time this year ends
we have got to raise airplane engine
production to a rate of better than
150 million dollars a month and tank
production must increase more than
fourfold. In addition, while it is
true that during April-the last
nionth for which complete figures
are available--more than 80 percent
of this industry's total output con-
sisted of war goods, it is also true
that total production by the indus-
try during April had not yet reached
half the level of peak monthly pro-
duction in 1941. In other words, as
I said a moment ago, the hard part
of this job has barely started."
Robert R. Nathan, Chairman of
the War Production Board's Plan-
ning Commission, agreed that/ the
industry accomplishments to date
warranted encouragement but added:
"Before we can be optimistic about
the outcome of this war we must
have accumulated a store of muni-
tions which will fill all of the pipe-
lines from the first assembly line toy
the last fighting outpost; and fur-'
ther, we must have a current flow of
munitions which will ensure a sus-
tained offensive action."
Nathan said that although nearly
$40,000,000,000 has been spent to
date on the American war effort,
only part of it has reflected finished
fighting material.

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Back Stage At The Mendelssohn
Is World Of Prociniums, Props
By BERYL SCHONFIELD
Back stage at the Mendelssohn Theatre, in the world of cycloramas,
hinged flats, dry pigment paint and prociniums, the technical expert of
tomorrow's drama are being educated.
For the first time in Repertory history, stage hands were required to
rehearse their parts in "The Rivals." To utilize scenic artist Howard Bay's
modern type backdrop, and to facilitate quick scene changing, crew mem-
bers were asked to change the scenery and furniture right before the audi-
ence-in 1775 period costume. %
Instead of the usual cumbersome flats, Bay had designed small, three-
panel folding screens, cunningly painted on one side to suggest houses for
the street scene, and on the other,
the flowery pattern of colonial par-
lor wallpaper.
Tank Room Relaid Scene changing meant merely re-
versing the screen's and rearranging
After Over 36 Years the few pieces of genuine Georgian-
type furniture. This novel idea and
the quick losk-step of the costumed
The tracks in the tank room of stage hands earned a big hand at
the marine engineering department each performance.
which have hauled model boats But, according to Jack Bender,
through the 300 feet long tank have Grad., chief stage manager for the
0 l1942 Repertory season, the folding
been torn tip to be straightened and screen background of "The Rivals"
relaid. is only one type of scenery employed
"After more than 36 years of con- in University productions. "Urder
tinuous service," explained Prof. the Gaslight," Bender points out,
Louis A. Baier of the marine engin- with its exaggerated perspective,
eering department, "the tracks have represented the stylized and sug-
become slightly uneven. Because gestive type of scenery, which is con-
some parts are lower than others trasted to the actual reproduction
there is tendency for small accelera- of realistic type used in the 1941
tions and decelerations to occur, hit, "The Little Foxes."
making very accurate observations In "The Contrast," Bender ex-
impossible." plained, "the entire stage was set
The huge tank, through which on a revolving turntable so that
model ships are towed to test differ- while the curtain was pulled, the
ent shaped hulls is 22 feet wide and surface merely had to be rotatediso
10 feet deep. It has been used re- that another section of it, set for
cently for much work for the Army the subsequent scene, faced the audi-
and Navy. ence.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
11:00 a.m. The Church at Worship.
Mr. Walter Van Hoek of Andver
Newton Theological Seminary will
preach on the subject, "Why Cannot
I?"
7:00 p.m. Dr. E. W. Blakeman,
Religious Counselor to Students for
the University, will conclude the
series of discussions on "Religious In-
struction in the Public Schools" at
the Roger Williams Guild. The meet-
ing will be held in the Guild House,
502 East Huron.
Unitarian Church, State and Hur-
on St. 11:00 a.m Church Service,
"Humans, Nature and Science." Solo
by Sidney Straight.
8 p.m. "The CIO Comes to Ann
Arbor" discussion led by representa-
tives of labor and others.
9 p.m. Social Hour.
First Congregational Church. Min-
ister. Rev. Leonard A. Parr. At the
morning service at 10:45, Dr. Parr
will speak on the subject, "Turning
Language Into Life."
The Monday Book Lecture will be
presented on Monday at 3 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday at 12:10
noon the Campus Worship service
will be held in this church.
Wesley Foundation: The student
class will meet in the lounge at 9:30
a.m. Sunday. Continuing his course
in "Personality and Religion," Dr.
Blakeman will discuss "Christian
Characteristics."
Wesley Foundation: At the Sun-
day evening meeting Mr. Wally Watt,
field worker with the Michigan Child
Guidance Institute, will speak on
"Problems of the Willow Run Com-
munity." Following his talk. three
discussion groups will meet: "Racial
Tolerance in Wartime," "Winning
the Peace,". "Uprooted Strangers in
our Midst." Supper and fellowship
at 6:00, program at 6:40.
Anchors of Faith. Rev. H. O. Yoder.
pastor of the Trinity Lutheran
Church, will speak this Sunday after-
noon at 4:30 ┬░ptm. at the Michigan
Christian Fellowship meeting in Lane
Hall on "Some of Faith's Anchors."
A musicale featuring the works of
Ernest Bloch will be presented by
Avukah this Sunday night at 8:00 in
the Hillel Foundation. Among the
compositions to be heard are: Baal
Shem Suite. Hebrew Rhapsody:
Shleomo, and a Violin Concerto. All
are welcome.
Dr. Leonard A. Parr of the First
Congregational Church is giving a
series of Monday Book Lectures in the
assembly room of the church at 3
p.m. Mondays. These lectures pre-
sent in brief review the current books
in Biography, Fiction, Poetry, World
Affairs, etc. The students and visi-
tors at the Summer Schools are spe-
cially invited to these lectures which
are free to the public. Tomorrow

i .!

The relaying is being done by the
Buildings and Grounds Department.

MAJOR lEAGUE BASEBALL:
Yankees Win And Keep Margin
As Red Sox Throttle Tigers, 6-4

By GEORGE R. CLARK
From Associated Press summaries
Luke Sewell's St. Louis Browns,
who refuse to be impressed by the
1942 Yankees but continue to get
beaten by them, came out on the
short end of the second consecutive
:5-2 ball game today as the Bronx
Bombers maintained their four-game
lead over the Boston Red Sox.
Three hits and three walks in the
first inning caused the sudden de-
parture of Brownie pitcher Johnny
Niggeling as the Yanks garnered five
runs. Atley Donald held the Browns
to nine well-scattered hits for his
fifth win of the year.
In Boston. the Detroit Tigers were
as helpful as possible in the Beat-
the-Yanks campaign, bowing to the
fast-moving Bosox by a 6-1 count
under the faltering hurling of Paul
"Dizzy" Trout and National League
derelict Roy Henshaw. Tex Hugh-
son, who slammed out three hits as
well as sending across the same num-
ber of runs, limited the Tigers to six
hits and earned his ninth victory. It
was the tenth time in fourteen meet-
ings between the two teams that De-
troit was humbled.
* * *
Hosox Whip Tigers
BOSTON, July 10.-For the tenth
time in 14 games this season the De-
troit Tigers fell before the Boston
Red Sox today when lanky Cecil
(Tex) Hughson, rookie right-hander,
pitched a neat six-hitter to achieve
his ninth victory, 6 to 1.
Detroit .......000 000 001-1 7 3
Boston .......030 030 00x-6 9 0
Trout, Henshaw (3) and Tebbetts,
Parsons (7); Hughson and Conroy.
Cards Take Giants
ST. LOUIS, July 10.-The St, Louis
Cardinals snatched a victory over
the New York Giants out of the fire
CLASSI FIED
DIRIECTORY
LOST and FOUND
LADY'S navy blue patent leather
fitted purse. Containing identifica-
tion, currency and travelers checks.
Lost on Cedar Bend Drive or Clo-
verleaf Dairy on Broadway. Re-
ward. Return to Mrs. Harryman,
West Quadrangle.
EOR RENT
STUDENT or Business Man to share
nicely furnished apartment near
carfipus. 607 Hill, call 2-3952.
HELP WANTED

today afte being shut out by Bob
Carpenter bn four hits for 8 2/3 in-
nings.
New York . .000 020 000 0-2 8 1
St. Louis . . .000 000 002 1-3 9 3
Carpenter, Adams (9) and Dan-
ning; M, Cooper, Lanier (8), Dickson
(10) and W. Cooper.,
* * *
Yanks Win Again
NEW YORK, July 10.-OP)-Mana-
ger Luke Sewell of St. Louis guessed
wrong today when he started Johnny
Niggeling on the mound with the re-
sult the New York Yankees whipped
the Browns 5 to .2
St. Louis .....001' 000 001-2 9 0
New York ... .500 000 00x-5 5 2
Niggeling, Ferens (1) and Ferrell;
Donald and Rosar.
* * *
Cleveland ....000 031 000-4 9 0
Philadelphia . .000 000 200-2 4 0
Harder and Denning; Besse, Shir-
ley (9) and Wagner.
* * *
Boston.... ..020 000 000-2 5 3
Chicago ......000 020 01x--3 6 1
Tobin and Lombardi; Passeau and
McCullough.
In The Majors
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Technical Skill Required
Elaborate technical skill was re-
quired in building the ramps, levels
and achieving the impressive mas-
siveness of the August Mystery Play
set, given in Hill Auditorium. On the
other hand, extreme simplicity was
obtained in the production of "Our
Town." which required only a few
chairs and a couple of ladders for
props.
The heavy scenery of "Trelawney
of the Wells" was placed on "tip
jacks," which enabled the scenery.
not in use to tip over on casters and
roll easily off the stage. This method
is particularly recommended for fem-
inine stage hands.
Suspended In Void
A last type of atmosphere em-
ployed in student productions is the
futuristic space setting variety of
"Jim Dandy." Here the props were
placed as nearly as possible to re-
semble being suspended in a void.
Witnesses to the Saroyan vehicle
will long remember the stark effec-
tiveness of the revolving library door
rising up in the midst of nothing.
Changing the scene, however, is
not the only task of the backstage
men. To them, too, falls the respon-
sibility of lighting and securing ap-
propriate stage furnishing' and see-
ing that the actors are on stage for
their cues.
Two others beside Bender-Wil-
liam Kinzer, Grad., property master,
and Donald Horton, electrician-hold
regular jobs for the Repertory sea-
son. All other technical jobs are per-
formed by volunteers from the Play
Production classes. Stage manager
for ""The Rivals" only, is Jack Ula-
noff, Grad., sole boss of the techni-
cal end of the show, and responsible
only to Bender. Stage crewmen are
separated into three divisions, "grips"
(carry props off stage manually);
"flymen" (move suspended scenery),
and "effects" (make off-stage noises,
as the well drill in "George Wash-
ington Slept Here" and thunder in
next week's "Thunder Rock.") Grips
for "The Rivals" are John Babing-
ton, '44, Frank A. Picard, II, '44,
Maryland Wilson and Mildred Hunt.
Subordinate Electrician
Horton's subordinate electricians
are Vera, Russell, William Ludwig
and Catherine Brookshire. Assist-
ants to the property master are Lucy,
Chase Wright, '44, and Pat Meikle,
'44. Responsible for getting the ac-
tors on stage are call girls Betty
Bartlett, '45, and Dorothy Chamber-
lain, '43.
All scenery is built and painted by
University students under the super-
vision of experienced and often pro-
fessional instructors. 1942 Repertory
technicalities are being directed by
President of the Scenic Artists of
America, Bay, and his two Broad-
way assistants, Horace Armistead
and William Kellam. Lucy Barton,
celebrated costumiere, gives the Rep-
ertory dress color and authenticity.

ry ,

. -1 foden i

New York.......5
Boston.........4
Cleveland .......4
Detroit ......... 4
St. Louis'......3
Chicago ........3
Philadelphia .. 3
Washington......

VP
2
48
6
4
2
4

L
26
30
36
40
43
44
52

Pct.
.667.
.615
.561
.524
.463
.421
.395

GB
4
8
1.1
16
19
22

29 51 .363 241

Friday's Results
Boston 6. Detroit 1
New York 5, St. Louis 2
Cleveland 4, Philadelphia 2
Chicago at Washington, night
* * *
NAtIONAL LEAGUE

Brooklyn......
$t. Louis . .. .
Cincinnati ......
New York... ..
Chicago ........
Pittsburgh.....
Boston ........
Philadelphia ....

W
X53
45
41
40
39
35
35
21

L
21
29
35
39
42
40
48
55

Pct.
.716
.608
.539
.506
.481
.467
.422
.276

GI

8
13
151/2
172
18/z
22 /2
33

Friday's Results
Chicago 3, Boston 2
St. Louis 3, New York 2 (10 ins.)
Broklyn 1, Cincinnati 2. night
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, night
(called)

Hnnouncinq-

STUDENT WANTED to work for
room. Call 719 Tappan. 10
WOMAN to take charge of small
apartment and 2 children for em-
ployed pareift. Live out. Call
2-3998 after 7:30 p.m. 9
Registered Nurses Attention: Your
services are very much needed for

New Summer Store Hours:
Daily: 7:45 A.M. -5:00 P.M.
Sat.: 7:45 A. M. - 1100 P.M.

with
rTAKESE HOE WYRGNABRUCE
A Al lO P BRoD CRAWFORD
DICK FORAN

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