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July 04, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

~ATBDY, UL1, 142TnlE M,. tIIGAN DAILY

PAGET8E

MiAJOR LEAGUE SCORES:
Yankees Beat Williams, Bosox;
Newhouser Whips Indians, 5-1

By HALE CHAMJION
From Associated Press Summnaries
A once proud Yankee teamthat
in the past few weeks has looked
pretty run down rose in some of its,
former might last night and smacked
down an upstart Bosox outfit, 5-3.
Now four games to the good the
world champions still have a lot of
pressure on them, for unless they take
a second game in the series their re-
covery cannot be looked upon as cer-
tain, and their lead will be dimin-
ished to what is for the Yanks no
lead at all.
Another feature of the day's play
was the smashing victory of the be-
loved bums from Brooklyn over the
Phils. Joe Medwick continued to set
a pace that has made him-after a
slump of two years-the most feared
"hitter in the senior circuit.
* . . *
Yanks Come Through
BOSTON, July 3.-The supposedly
faltering New York Yankees opened;
their crucial 3-game series against1
the hard-pressing Boston Red Sox
with a 5-3 victory tonight behind
Spud Chandler's eight-hit pitching.
in the first twilight game in Bos-
ton's Major League history. The game
was played before a 21,296 crowd.
New York ....300 141 000--5 8 1
at Boston ..201 000 000-3 8 1
Chandler and Dickey; Wagner,,
Brown and Conroy.
Dodgers Crush Phils
PHILADELPHIA, July 3. -The
Brooklyn Dodgers pounded six pitch-
ers for 13 hits and crushed the Phila-
delphia Phils 8-1 today as Whitlow
Wyatt tossed a five-hitter for his1
eighth mound triumph of the season.<
Brooklyn .....001 120 202-8 13 0
at.Philadelphia 000 010 000-1 5 0
* '

Wyatt and Owen; Hoerst, Nahem
(5), Be (6), Podgajny (7) Hughes
(9), Johnson (9) and Livingston,
Warren (8).
* * *
Bucs Nip St. Louis
ST. LOUIS, July 3.-The Pitts-
burgh Pirates hammered three of the
Cardinals' front-line pitchers for a
5 to 4 victory on 10 hits today, with
Elbie Fletcher and Vince DiMaggio
pounding home runs. The Cards ral-
lied with two runs in the ninth.
Pittsburgh .. ..110 100 020-5 10 1
at St. Louis ... .000 010 012-4 13 1
Lanning and Lopez; Warneke, La-
nie' (6), Krist (8) and O'Dea, W.
Cooper (8).
* * *
Braves Outslugged
NEW YORK, July 3.-The New
York Giants downed the Boston
Braves, 10-6, in a twilight-arc light
game this evening, with home runs
by Johnny Mize, Mel Ott and Mickey
Witek accounting for five of their
tallies.
Boston .......001 000 131- 6 9 1
at New York .310 231 00x-10 10 1
Javery, Early (2), Hutchings (5),
Wallace (7) and Lombardi, Kluttz
(5); Carpenter, Adams (9) and Dan-
ning.
Night Baseball
Detroit .......400 000 100-5 2 0
at Cleveland ..000 000 001-1 3 0
Newhouser and Tebbetts; Harder,
Ferrick, Eisenstat and Hegan.
* * * '
Philadelphia . .000 000 000-0 5 1
at Washington 000 202 00x-4 7 1
Fowler, Christopher (7) and Swift;
Masterson and Early.

Today's News
On Cdmpus...
Vocational Lectures
Beginning with a registration
meeting for all people interested in
positions, both teaching and other-
wise, the first of a series of four
weekly vocational guidance lectures
will be presentedat 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, July 8 in the Rackham Lecture
Hall by Dr. T. Luther Purdom, di-
rector of the University Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation.
Grad Outing Club
A meeting of the Graduate Outing
Club will be held at 2:30 p.m. tomor-
row at the group's club room in the
Rackham Building.
According to Robert Stepens,
president, permanent committees to
handle the summer's program will
be selected at this time. Among the
activities which the committees will
be called on to arrange are projected
canoe and bicycle trips and a sight-
seeing excursion to Greenfield Vil-
lage.
Following the meeting the club
will adjourn to the Arboretum
where they will have supper.
Michigan dames
The Michigan Dames will hold
their annual informal tea for the
wives of all the students of the sum-
mer sessions, interns, and mothers
of students now on campus, in the
ballroom of the Michigan League
Wednesday, July 8.
/Major League Standingh_
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Is Offered At Palmer
Hey, fellas, here's your ,chance to
show off those new PEM built mus-
cles to the girl friend. All you have
to do is wake up to the enticing co-
recreational opportunities being of-
fered at Palmer Field and the Wq-
men's Athletic Building.
The abundant facilities of the wo-
men's athletic plant, including ten-
nis courts, putting green, and bad-
minton courts, are all open to wo-
men students and their lucky male
companions.
Loosely knit tennis and baseball
clubs are being planned to furnish
opportunities for prospective parti-
cipants to meet others intierested in
the same sports.
Hopwood
NVotes
Five University of Michigan stu-
dents, some of them former Hop-
wood winners, have had their work
published in recent issues of several
national magazines.
Norman Rosten, winner of a ma-
jor poetry and drama award in 1938,
had a poem "Elegy" published in the
May 23 "New Yorker."
Ruth Lechlitner, a University grad-
uate, whose poem, "Starlight, Star-
bright," saw publication in the "New
Yorker" forlMay 2 has also had work
published in "Poetry Magazine."
"To Market and Home Again," a
short story by Naiomi Gilpatrick,
graduate attending the University,
was published in the May issue of
"The Writer."
John Ciardi, winner of the major
poetry award in 1939, has a poem,
"The Fourth of July" appearing in
the Summer Issue of "Common
Ground."
Elena Mitcoff, winner of one of
the major awa'rds in fiction in 1938,
will have a play called "The Maid
Was in the Garden" included in an
anthology now being compiled by
the Greenburg publishers.
Ehr-nann To Give Lecture.
On Week's War Progress
The second of a summer-long series
of University lectures-"Weekly Re-
view of the War" by Prof. Howard
M. Ehrmann of the history depart-
'ment-will be given at 4:15 p.m.
Tuesday in the Rackham Amphithe-
atre.
Professor Ehrmann comprehensive-
ly recalls the most important news
of the fighting fronts, interprets it
and indicates possible future trends.
His lectures are given each Tuesday.
,t

The second and final part of Vic-
tory Weekend will be held from 9
p.rn. to midnight today in the League
Ballroom and while actual decora-
tions will be the same as last night's
flag parade, the "Firecracker Fling"
will reilly be as noisy as the name
suggests.
Snapper-crackers - those things
that explode and suddenly you find
your fortune, a prize and a paper
hat-will be given out at the door
to every person attending the dance.
All this is to be provided through the
efforts of the Sumier Session Social
Committee.
The 30 flags representing the Unit-
ed Nations will again be used on the
walls and the hostesses will con-
tinue to wear their= red, white and
blue hair ribbons as a means of dis-
tirktion.
Women chosen for the second half
of Victory Weekend to act in the
capacity of hostesses are Jane
Scholes, Miquette Davis, Hazel John-
son, Virginia Appleton, Maxine Hall,
Mary Maurice and Marion Carlson.
The list is completed with Sybil
There will be a meeting of
Sphinx at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at
the Union.
--Charles Pinney

Winston, Mary Ann Gooding, Ethel
Sherwindt, Sybil Marks, Joanna Ser-
aphin and Mitzy Kinnivan.
All_ students and townspeople are
urged to attend the "Firecracker
Fling" as a means of celebrating the
holidays.

'Firecracker Fling' To Complete
League Dance 'Vtory Weekend'

F!

The International Center will open
its summer activities next week with
a lecture by Miss Josephine Brown
on "Chinese Industrial Cooperatives"
and the annual Summer Reception.
Sponsored by the Center in con-
junction with the Chinese Students
Club and the Philippine Michigan
Club, Miss Brown's talk will take
place at 4:15 p.m. Monday in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
The annual Summer Reception will
be held from 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday in honor of the new for-
eign students.
Honored guest at this year's Re-
ception is r. B. A. Liu, research as-
sociate an assistant to the director
of the China Institute in America.
Dr. Liu is here this summer studying
Intercultural Relations in the Educa-
tion Workshoip.

1

1942 SUMMER STUDENT and FACULTY
DIRECTORY

New York ......
Boston .........
Cleveland ......
Detroit ........
St. Louis .......
Chicago.......
Philadelphia '... .
Washington ...,

W
48
44
43
43
34
30
31
27

L
24
26
34
36
40
41
49
48

Pet.
.667
.629
.558
.544
.459
.423
.388
.360

GB
4
7%1
81/%
15
1712
21
22%/

SUMMER SESSION and SUMMER TERM STUDENTS

Your School
It's Easy to Recogniz'e
Michigan Engineers

Friday's Results
Detroit 5, Cleveland 1
Washington 4, Philadelphia 0
New York 5, yBoston 3
Saturday's Games

Solid Gold
Blue Spinel
$25.00
phils Federal and
State taxes

NAME - SCHOOL
ANN ARBOR ADDRESS ANN

Detroit at Cleveland (2)
New York at Bostoh (2)
Philadelphia at, Washington
St. Louis at Chicago (2)
* * *
NATIONAt LEAGUE

Brooklyn......
St. Louis ......
Cincinnati.....
New York . .....
Chicago ........
Pittsburgh.....
Boston........
Philadelphia

W L
49 20
40 28
39 33
38 35
37 38
33 38
33 44
19 52

Pet.
.710
.588
.542
.521
.493
.465
.429
.268

r
r

(2)
GB
82
1112
13
15
171/
20
30,/2

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

11

0

See a 1943 Class Ring
BURR, PATTERSON & AULD .CO.

tII

.
. . I

1

Friday's Results
Brooklyn 8, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 4
New York 10, Boston 6
Only games scheduled.
Saturday's' Games

1209 South U
Summer Hours:'

niversity Ruth Ann Oakes, Mgr.
10:00-5:00 Daily, 10:00-1 :00 Saturday

Brooklyn at Philadelphia
Boston at New York (2)
Chicago at St. Louis (2)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

(2)

.
j .

_1

tIlb

2"

11

1- U

CHURCH
DIRECTORY

HELP WANTED
ALL YEAR ,ROUND room job near
Law School. Call 7380 or 4800. 7c
FOR RENT
LOVELY ROOM for graduate stu-
dent, campus secretary, or teach-
er. 422 E. Washington. 8c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
MISCELLANEOUS
BABY WRENN NURSERY - Home
care for infants and small chil-
dren. Call 8531. 4*
WANTED
BOARD and ROOM offered. To drive
and do odd jobs. Call 6018. 343
S. Fifth Ave.
LOST and FOUND
WIRE HAIRED TERRIER. Male. 4
months old. Lost from 632 Church.
Call 3745. 9c
WANTED TO RENT*
TEACHER, wife and child desire
modern furnished apartment. Oc-
cupancy July 6 to August 21. Call
Williams, 4439 after 7:30 p.m. 5*

I

LAST TIMES TODAY AT 12:15- 4:10 - 8:00 P.M.
HOLIDAY PRICESDA "GONE WITH TE WIND'
STARTt SUNDAY!
{
i/
An unforgettable event in screen
entertainmenth..If you're looking.'
for laughter. .. you never had a
greater opportunity than now..,
since Chaplin added heart-touch-
ing music and hilarious words to
this masterpiece of comedy
*/
: m~
i6
r'r
..k r ."Ya * {yym"
J 4~f _ !

1111 ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

306North Division at Catherine Minist(
The Rev. Henry Lewis, S.T.D., Rector
The Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Music:
Student Chaplain
The Rev. John G. Dahl, Curate 9:30 A.M. Ur
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster W. Blaken
8:00 A.M. Holy Communions 10:40 A.M. C]
11:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon by the :Hildren m
Rev. Henry Lewis. 10:40 A.M. Wc
11:00 A.M. Summer Church School (Grades 1-6). jest is "Vic
11:00 A.M. Kincergarten (Harris Hall). 6:00 P.M. W
5:00 P.M. Episcopal Student Guild. Picnic at sity studen
the home of Reardon Peirsol, 625 Oxford lowship hog
Road. oSpeaker: Dr. John Bell on "Relig-
ion and Psychology."
Wednesday, July 8.
4:00 P.M. Student Tea (Harris Hall). FIRST CHUI
5:15 P.M. Evening Prayer (Harris Hall Chapel). 409 South
Thursday, July 9.
7:10 P.M. Holy Communion (Harris Hall Chap- Wednesday ev
el). Sunday morni
Subject: "(
Sunday School
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Free Public R
ton Street,
512 East Huron and holida
C. H. Loucks, Minister Saturdays
10:00 A.M. Children's Departments of the Church
School.
10:15 A.M. Adult Classes of the Church School. FIRST PRESI
The Student Class, led by Mr. Loucks, will

["Per ectiox in

w
We7

m

TODAY and Saturday
Relax to this absorbing story
of the easy-going-est family
that ever lived without work-
ing . . . From the Saturday
Evening Post serial, "No
More Gas," by the authors
of "Mutiny on the Bounty"
CHARLES LAUGHTON
in
f Tahiti

I

Ell

I1

I

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