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August 20, 1942 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-08-20

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AUGUST 20, 1942

TUlE MICHIGAN DAILY

War In usry
Is Taken Over
ByArmy Man
President Uses Emergency
Powers For Seventh
Time In Crisis
By The Associated Press
President Roosevelt exercised his
emergency powers for the seventh
time yesterday to order a private in-
dustry taken over by the Army.
On orders from the White House
Acting Secretary of War Robert P.
Patterson directed Major Ralph F.
Gow of the Boston Ordnance District
to take possession of the S. A. Woods
Machine Company of South Boston,
Mass., and operate it.
Patterson said failure of the firm
to comply with a War Labor Board
order requiring the inclusion of
maintenance of union membership
and arbitration clauses in a contract
with CIO workers "has created a se-
rious threat to the production of
vital war material which it manu-
factures."
The plant management had asked
the Board to hold up its order pend-
ing a test in the courts, but at the
same time gave assurances that it
would cooperate with the govern-
ment if the plant were taken over.
CIO aluminum workers discussed
in Pittsburgh a report of their pres-
ident, Nick A. Zonarich, that union
members favor a general strike in the
industry unless the WLB reconsid-
ers a denial of wage increases.
The board denied a $1 daily rise
on the ground the workers had re-
ceived more than a 15 per cent in-
crease since Jan. 1, 1941. Zonarich,
said the increase has been eight cents
an hour, while the Aluminum Com-
pany of America said the rise was 23
per cent.

MAJOR LEAGUE STANDINGS:
Baseball Can't Depend
To See It Through

'By HALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press Summaries
Baseball men have been having a
whale of a time lately contemplating
next year's player crop in the Majors.
They have, visions of reincarnated
versions of St. Petersburg's 75 or
over ball club cavorting on the na-
tion's diamonds.
It must have been a rude jolt when
they ran into the draft rulings of the
last few weeks. Evidently playing
soldier isn't strictly a young man's
game, and clubs that felt safe be-
cause their players averaged over
thirty are now taking another look
at matters.
For instance, there is one man
above all others who is the Old Man
of big-time baseball, Ted Lyons. He
is 41 years old, which is just about
as aged as any ball player ever gets
without retiring. Yet just yesterday
a draft board in Vinton, Louisiana,
wanted to have a look at Mr. Lyons.
They already know. he's Class I, but
they're interested in adding an A.
And Lyons is not the only old man.
Charlie Gehringer, who came out of
retirement with the Detroit Tigers
only to serve as a pinch-hitter, also
is taking steps which a draft board
dictates. Now Gehringer dropped
baseball because of aches and pains,
but he's still wanted by the classic
finger-pointer, Uncle Sam.
By way of contrast, there's another
player on these same Tigers who
would seem able to do just about any-
thing the Army demanded of him.
But young Lefty Hal Newhouser has
been told that life in khaki is not
for the likes of him. Rules you know
must be observed.
Meanwhile, despite the fact that
ball players are going into the serv-
ice right and left, Branch Rickey of
the Cardinals' front office announces
that baseball must be continued. If

so, I expect t
ging flies in
Gerard Darrc
into the oth
The old m
to the wars
to. do fromY
is evidently2
if he thinkst
get Baby Sa
cials change
next year loo
pennant race
Tigers 6,

IWalterhouse, Wikel Win WiCkard Asks Frmers
OnVets Inii Iij
On Vet " " (;( df mi""i'" In Breaking Price C
a C i In the feature match in the Junior
W arGrIs division of ahe Ann Arbor Men's n, r ase
Golf Tournament, Dick Walterhouse, WASHINGTON. Au ,. 19 Secre- evolved
three sport star who will enterMich- tary of Agriculture Wickard called "Such a plh
to see Baby Sandy shag- igan in the fall, won a thrilling 191uo amr oih otk h emtanr
right field as Quiz Kid hole match 1 up yesterday, laduin breaking a price control - -in th e 'meat-
w laces a ping-pong ball Walterhouse is the longest hitter in jami beging a prison o th the ee
er half of the crib. the entire tournament and qualified jame by giving up a proision of the in heg u penrs W
andthekid wold aveof hefavrits i hi diisin, ce nto arity, the plan must.L
en are apparently going with an 80 to take a position as one on farm prices at less than 110 per re:, clla:
and the kids would havef of the favorites in his division. cent faprice ty. es tan 10er u. uast
here on in. Mr. Rickey Howard Wikel, a sophomore in the .Todaty.110 per cent provision tlr, st bl
a highly optimistic man University and a fine prospect with is beodg te 11 py ct prois tle mistibu
the salaries he pays will Coach Ray Fisher's summer ball club, to prove that farmers ai'e asking for protect packei
ndy. Unless draft offi- alo stayed in the running with an
their mind baseball for easy 7 and 6 triumph over Ralph m.r is being used as an arument to piices."
ks as dead as this year's Burt. slow n ecomic contros i th pe.
s. Walterhouse and Wikel are in op- fields" -epealot
* posing brackets and may easily meet 'Under present circumstances, rice limitati
in the tourney finals. the secretary said. "I believe it would IVlt as one of ;

r)ltrol Jam

Cleveland ....000 000 010-1 6 2
Detroit .......104 000 01x-6 10 1
Bagby, Ferrick, Heving and Desau-
tels, Denning; Trucks and Parsons.I
. * *, *
Yanks, Bosox Split
New York . . ..003 000 010-4 7 0
Boston .......220 002 00x-6 10 0
Chandler, Branch and Dickey;
Hughson and Peacock.

New York,. .. .000 000 101-2
Boston.......000 010 000-1
Bonham and Rosar, Dickey;
son and Conroy.
A's 8, Senators 0
Philadelphia ..140 012 000-8
Washington . .000 000 000-0
Wolff and Wagner; Hudson,
borough, Zuber and Evans.
* * *

5 0
6 0
Dob-

12 0
9 3
Scar-I

Bums 11, Boston I
Boston ......010 000 000- 1 8 3
Brooklyn ....203 012 12x-11 19 0
Salvo, Javery, Donovan, Sain and
Kluttz; Davis and Owen.
.i e 9
Pirates 9, C y 2

I]]

c
r
z

Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Gornicki
Thompson,
Lakeman.

...000"108 000-9 11 01
...000 010 001-2 8 2
and Phelps; Derringer.
Shoun and Lamanno,

Camera Supplies
for, Vacationers

Major League Standingb
AMERICAN LEAGUE

You'll want to have your camera
in A-1 condition for your vacation.
Remember to stop in and let us
check it over for you. And while
you're at it be sure to see the fine
new line of cameras we are of-

New York ......
Boston ........
Cleveland......
St. Louis.....
Detroit ........
Chicago .......
Washington ....
Philadelphia ...
Games
Philadelphia
NewYork at

W
.78
.66
.62
.62
.60
.50
.47
.46

L
40
51
56
57
62
62
66
77

Pet.
.661
.546
.525
.521
.492
.446
.416
.374

GB
11% 1
16
16 %/
25
25
28%
34%
(2)

At The State .
Bringing murder to the college
campus along with popular song hits
and girls and comedian Eddie Brac-
ken, 'Sweater Girl' will open at the
State today.
This fast moving murder thriller
centersiaround a campus musical
production starring song and dance
man Eddie Bracken with
June Preisser. Betty Rhodes, who
recently played in 'The Fleet's In,'
will sing the popular torch number,
I Don't Want to Walk Without You,'
as part of the musical productions.
Other tunes featured are, 'I Said
Ne,' 'What Happens Now?' and
'Sweater Girl.'
June Preisser, blonde acrobatic
dancer, is teamed together with Ed-
die Bracken for the first time in
'Sweater Girl.' They with 16 beauti-
ful girls form the chief attraction
in the college musical drama and the
film as well.
Other actors in 'Sweater Girl' are
Phillip Terry, Nils Ather, Fried
Inescort, and Betty Jane Rhodes.
At The Michigan .. .
Based on the well known story, 'Mr.
and 0Mrs. Cugat' the film comedy
'Are Husbands Necessary' starring
Ray Milland, Betty Field and Patri-
cia Morrison will open at the Mich-
igan today.
This Paramount comedy concerns
the trials and tribulations of Mr.
and Mrs. Cugat (Ray Milland and
Betty Field) who are addicted to
the 'whiffles'--little white lies. Based
upon the best-seller Isabel Scott Ro-
rick novel, the picture presents Ray
Milland as George Cugat, a young
banker with a future and a slightly
giddy wife. Betty Field is the wife
and Pat Morrison is the 'other wo-
man,' a man-mad divorcee who sets
her cap for Mr. Cugat almost wreck-
ing the happy home.
Ray Milland recently played in
'Reap the Wild Wind,' and Betty
Field recently completed 'Kings Row.'
Byron Nelson Wins
Ohio GolfTourney
CLEVELAND, Aug. 19 -W)--By-
ron Nelson of Toledo Inverness prov-
ed todayhe's Ohio's No. 1 golf pro-
fessional by winning his third conse-
cutive state open championship with
a total 72-hole total of 273 strokes-
11 under par.
Nelson, after a scintillating roun
of 63 on his opening jaunt around
the tough par 71 Mayfield course,
came back with rounds of 69,69 and
72 to hold a five-stroke margin over
Herman Keiser of Akron, who finish-
ed second with 278.
In third place, with 284, was ano-
ther Akron ace, Al Espinosa, three-
time state king, 284.

be wise to repeal this provision.
Under this recommendation, made
in a speech prepared for broadcast
over the Blue Network, price ceilings
on farm products could be estab-
lished at a parity level.
Declaring that he was not forget-
ing that abundant production was
all-important, Wickard advocated
the payment of government subsi-
dies in cases where parity prices pro-
vided an insufficient incentive.
Wickard said also that he was pre-
pared to approve price ceilings on
livestock-a proposal suggested by
some meat packers and the Office of
Price Administration-'"if a practical
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
REPLIES
THERE IS a reply in Box 8.
HELP WANTED
CARRIERS wanted to carry routes
for Michigan Daily this fall. Call
Duane Kenaga, 5627, evenings.

LOST and FOUND

fering.

00 ':

Thursday
at Washington
Boston}

All sorts of camera supplies. Color
filIms and all types of black-an4-white
films. Extra equipment that makes pic-

ROUND, silver Ronson lighter lost
on 2ampus. Reward. Call O'Brien,
2-2565, 40
LOST: Gold watch chain with Wal-
tham watch attached. Watch
bears initials F. M. G. Call 2-5611.
Reward. 41
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: A ride to California. Will
share expenses and driving. Call
Frantz, 4017.
WANTED
BOARD JOB WANTED. Call Bob SP
Champion, 2-3101, after 6 p.m.
SEMI

I"'I,,

St. Louis at Chicago (night)
Only games scheduled.
* A * *U
NATIONAL LEAGUE

tures better than ever.
expert developing and
service.

Remember' our
photo-finishing

W
Brooklyn .:.....80t
St. Louis.........74
New York .......65'
Cincinnati......58
Pittsburgh ......54
Chicago ........54
Boston.......48
Philadelphi .. . .32

L
35
42
53
57
59
68
72
79

Pct.
.696
.638
.551
.504
.478
.443
.400
.289

GB
61%2
16'/2
22
25
291%
34 %
46

CALKN S -FEC

324 South State

818 South State

NI II

I

IF

Ij
A L you will want
to add to your collection.
MY GAL SAL
Famous Barber Shop Ballads
Sung by MILLS BROTHERS
Decca 336 $2.43
YANKEE DOODLE DANDY
Song Hits of George M. Cohan
FRED WARING and His PENNSYLVANIANS
Orchestra and Glee Club Decca 330 $1.16
HOLIDAY INN
Featuring BING CROSBY - FRED ASTAIRE
Words annd Music by Irving Berlin
Decca 306 $3.78

Games Thursday
New York at Brooklyn (twilight)
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
Only games scheduled
Ann Arbor Thrift Shop
Is Charitable Institution
Established in 1932 as a depression
measure, the Ann Arbor Thrift Shop
operates today at its 4th Street head-
quarters as a non-profit, charitable
institution.
Following a policy of "anything
taken, anything sold," the organiza-
tion comprises about sixty-five Ann
Arbor women who work as volun-
teers, selling and repairing donated
goods. All profits from the sales are
donated to charity.

'A

BUY WAR BONDS AND STAMPS HERE!
Shows Daily at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

-3mmmc-.

EREW ;1TWBREEZES
TNT . A..vikA Bow! _____________

w

STARTS TODAY

_. _

CARLOS GARDEL
The Great Interpreter of Argentine Tango
Decca 3331
JAZZ NOCTURNES
Piano Duets by
HARRY FIELDS and MARLENE FINGERLE
Decca 299;

In this group are white oxfords and
broadcloths. Complete size range from
14 to 17. Former values $2.65 to $5.

$2.70

$2.70

GEMS OF JAZZ - VOL. 4

$235
2

III

flt mmc Uillni U mcjmbll

I

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