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July 16, 1942 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-16

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THURSDAY; JULY 16, 1942

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE-

Rural School

I mroveent
Up To Public
When the public realizes that coil-
dren in rural areas should be given
the same educational opportunities
as those in the cities, the placement
of a professionally competent teacher
in -every classroom will be a practic-
able possibility, declared A. V. Overn,
of the University of North Dakota,
yesterday at the University High
Sciool.
This will be accomplished through
certain far-reaching changes in
school organization and administra-
tion, he said, in his talk for the edu-
cation school lecture series. These
changes include redistricting of'
school attendance areas to create
larger ones in rural districts, the
prevention of large oversupplies and
acute shortages of teachers at dif-
ferent times, and the attraction of
teachers to all types of areas by such
inducements as reasonable tenure
and compensation while in service.
The next lecture will be given by
Fritz Redl, associate professor of so-
cial service administration, Wayne
University, at 4:05 p.m. today in the
University High Auditorium. He will
discuss "The Need for Group Psycho-
logical Securities for Growing Youth."

Beware Of Those PEM Boys!
Gouging, Knee Raising Become
Strictly Marquis Of Queensbury

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK, July 15.-Those po-
lite lads from Hell's Kitchen and Port
Said may now push over-those who
are left at least-for their gouging,
knee raising and knife wielding is
strictly Marquis of Queensberry.
The new champion of "get him be-
fore he gets you" displayed his wares
here. And even top sergeantsj
winced!
He is Major W. E. Fairbairn, train-
er of the British Commandos, on loan
to the U.S. to show the American
soldier, sailor and marine how to
treat the Axis.
Major Fairbairn, mild looking and
mild talking British veteran of 57
years, explained his method to an
audience made up of every branch
of the service as he tossed big strap-
ping exponents of Judo (Jiu-Jitsu)
about the Hotel Astor's College Room.
Before he got through the post-
prandial exercises, the same room
looked like a picnic of the Donney-
brook Chowder and Marching Soci-
ety. Usually correct majors from the
Air Force were practising on lieu-
tenant .commanders from the Navy,
ensigns were tossing chief petty of-
ficers about hand vice versa) and civ-

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HELP WANTED
IS THERE any mother who would
like to increase the family income
by caring for two small children
at her home during week-days?
If so please call 2-3998 after 7:30
p.m. 9
MISCELLANEOUS
TEACHER of shorthand or type-
writing or bookkeeping to ex-
change services for instruction in
bookkeeping, dictation, typewrit-
ing, dictaphone or calculator.
Hamilton Business .College, Wil-
liam at State. Phone 7831 or 4627.
14c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
I Shows at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

Feature at:
1:39 - 3:40
5:41
7:45 -+9:49 P.M.
.cMH.asav., rrs ~

WANTED TO RENT
FURN SHED HOUSE wanted. Three
or four bedrooms. Two master
baths. Southeast section. Occu-
pancy September first. State rent.
Reply Box 100, Michigan Daily.
LOST and FOUND
MAN'S plastic wallet containing cur-
rency and identification. Lost near
I-M Building Tuesday.. Reward.
Call 9393 or at 417 W. Engineering.
MONEY LOST on campus Sunday.
Approximately $50. Reward. Find-
er please call Thor Reykdal, 2-1044.
14
EASTMAN KODAK, size 620, in
black leather case. Lost near
Nickel's Arcade. Reward. Call
Catherine Mosher, 4121, Ext. 2138.
18c
LADY'S navy blue patent leather
fitted purse. Containing identifica-
tion, currency and travelers checks.
Lost on Cedar Bend Drive or Clo-
verleaf Dairy on Broadway. Re-
ward. Return to Mrs. Harryman,
West Quadrangle.
FOR SALE
RETURN coach ticket Detroit to
New York. Good until August 29.
$11.50. Telephone 5881. 16
FARMS FOR SALE
TWO MILES from city limits. 80
acres in good neighborhood. Re-
modeled brick farmhouse among
fine trees; large, attractive rooms;
hardwood floors; steam heat; two
baths. Two basement barns, silo,
garage, orchard. $14,500. Also oth-
er good farms, some with lakes.
Oril Ferguson, realtor, 928 Forest.
Phone 2-2839. 17c
FOR RENT
DOUBLE ROOM with adjoining
lavatory. Also single room. Ideal
location for teachers, students or
campus secretaries. Garage avail-
able. 422 E. Washington. 19c
BROOKLYN ...
I1S SHANGRI-LA..
with a "Greenpernt" accent!
er ectwon in modemrn

ilians who've been found wanting
physically, insofar as Army service is
concerned, were using uniformed
men as aerial torpedoes.
What is Major Fairbairn's meth-
od? It's a college degree Jiu-Jitsu,
it's magna cum laude Hell's Kitchen;
post graduate Port Said mixed with
war sense.
Local Blackout
Planned .Today
(Continued from Page 1)
in total darkness, with building ward-
ens in charge of separate buildings
and a special staff of observers on
duty to note the effectiveness of the
blackout over the city.
The spotlights on the Charles
Baird Carillon Tower will be off and
the entire unit of the University
Hospital is ready to darken its nu-
merous windows within the two-
minute warning period.
A special observation plane will
circle the blackout area to gauge the
effect from the air.
Urging the cooperation of all mem-
bers of the University staff, Walter.
M. Roth, assistant superintendent of
the Buildings and Grounds Depart-
ment, yesterday cautioned all per-
sons occupying space in any Univer-
sity building to turn, out the lights
at the first sounding of the whistles
and to check all adjoining corridors
and public spaces for lights.
In a message to the people of Ann
Arbor, Mayor Leigh J. Young yes-
terday pointed out the penalties for
violations of the blackout rules.
These are anything from a one-
hundred-dollar fine to ninety days
in jail depending upon enforcement
by the police department.
"Everybody should try to stay in-
doors," Chief of Police Sherman Mor-
tenson said. "We'll have patrol cars
on the streets and the safest place
to be is home. If you get caught on
the streets, however, be especially
careful to stand aginst buildings in
order to prevent any accidents."
Blast Rocks Cincinnati
Loop, Kills Four People
CINCINNATI, July 15. --')- An
explosion under Sycamore Street and
only two blocks from downtown
Fountain Square killed at least four
persons and injured five shortly be-
fore midnight tonight, first reports
from hospitals indicated.
Cause of the blast was not deter -
mined immediately, but' witnesses
said a sheet of yellow flame burst
from under the basement of a three-
story building of the Hodge Rent-a-
Car business and flashed through a
gaping hole torn in the street.

Whirlaway'
Whirls Away
With $50,000
BOSTON, July 15.-WP-Mighty
Whirlaway came from far back to
become the turf's top money winner
of all time by beating Rouders by
two and a half lengths today in the
$50,000 added Massachusetts Handi-
cap at Suffolk Downs.
Attention placed third in the sev-
en-horse field, just ahead of the
early-footed Apaches as Whirly set
a new track record of 1:48 1/5 for
the mile and an eighth distance.
Whirlaway, owned by Warren
Wright, got away very slowly and did
not pull even with any horse until he
was half-way around the final turn
where jockey Georgie Woolf called
upon him to go into his sensational
stretch drive.
The triumph, the first scored by
a favorite in this event since 1937,
when Seabiscuit won, was worth
$43,850 and it increased Whirlaway's
total earnings to $454,366. As a re-
sult, Whirly now tops Seabiscuit's
earnings by $16,636.
A crowd of 33,000, which made the
famed "Mr. Big Tail" an even-money
favorite, roared him a mighty wel-
come as he came flying under the
wire after running over his six rivals.
Major League Standing
AMERICAN LEAGUE

By HALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press Summaries
With the season half gone, it ap-
pears that more pitchers than in any
recent season have a chance to win
20 Major League games. Rumors of
a dead ball may have something to
do with it, but an unusual number
of hurlers are burning up their re-
spectiveUcircuits.
In the National League, Cub
Claude Passeau is out in front with
13 on the credit side. But close be-
hind come a good many, some of
whom fattened their chucking aver-
ages yesterday.
Bucky Walters of the Reds picked
up No. 11, but he still trails Rhine-
land teammate Ray Starr, who hag
12 winners. At the same time Rip
Sewell became the only Pirate to
amass 10 victories.
Johnny Beazley of the Cards also
pitched the tenth big one as he beat
Philadelphia. Other. big winners in
the circuit include Whit Wyatt, and
Larry French of the Dodgers and
Cliff Melton of the Giants.
In the American League the poten-
tial twenty-game winners are also
coming thick and fast. Chandler
and Bonham of the Yanks, Tex
Hughson of the Boston Red Sox, Jim
Bagby of Boudreau's scrappy Indi-
ans, and Brownie Eldon Auker all
sport first-class chances. Some of
their fellow hurlers are not far be-
hind. Witness Borowy of the Yanks
and a few of the Detroit pitchers.
Dead ball or not, they're happy
about it.
Bosox 10, (:hisox 1
Chicago .....100 000 000- 1 7 3
Boston ......100 020 07x-10 13 2
Smith and Turner; Hughson and
Conroy.
Yanks 4, Indians 0

Giants 2, Pirates 6
New York ....000 000 002-2 6 1
Pittsburgh . ..002 100 30x-6 9 2
Carpenter, Sunkel (7), Adams (7)
and Danning; Sexell and Lopez.
Brooklyn 10, Cubs 5
Brooklyn ....013 131 010-10 13 2
Chicago .....000 210 02x- 5 9 5
Higbe, Casey (8) and Owen; Pas-
seau,- Bithorn (3), Erickson (5),
Pressnell (7), Mooty (9) and Her-
nandez, McCullough.
Braves 2, 7, Reds 6,2
Boston ..000 110 000-2 5 3
Cincinnati ...012 000 30x--6 12 1
Tobin and Lombardi; Walters and
Lamanno.
Boston .......000 050 101-7 9 0
Cincinnati .. .000 001-100--2 7 1
Salvo and Kluttz; Derringer,
Thompson (6), Johnson (8) and
Hemsley.
* * *

Night Games

New York ......
Boston........
Cleveland ......
Detroit......
St. Louis.....
Chicago......
Philadelphia.
Washington ...

MAJOR LE AGU E RESU LTS:
Many Big League Hurlers Have
Shot At Twenty Game Honors

w
..56
..49
..49
.45
..41
.35
.36
..30

L
28
34
38
43
43
47
54
54

Pct.
.667
.590
.563
.511
.488
.927
.400
.357

GB
61/2
81/2
1212
14
20
22
2412

Thursday's Games
Detroit at Washington, night
St. Louis at Philadelphia
Cleveland at New York
Chicago at Boston
N * *A
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Detroit ... .000 100 101 00-3 15 0
Wash'ton .100 010 100 01-4 12 0
Bridges, White (8) and Tebbetts,
Parsons (8); Wynn and Early.
Chicago ......260 002 010-11 15 0
Boston ......004 000 200- 6 10 3
Dietrich, Haynes (6) and Tresh;
Wagner, Butland (2), Terry (7),
Ryba (8) and Peacock.
City Rental Office
Aids War Workers
To help find housing for wartime
workers, Ann Arbor has set up a
homes registration office at 114 S.
Fourth Ave. where houses, apart-
ments and rooms for rent can be
listed.
The new service is part of Ann
Arbor's information center and it is
endorsed by all the local real estate
dealers. The cooperation between
realtors and the registration office
1works- something like this:
A person interested in finding a
room, apartment or house first con-
sults the registration list. After he
finds what hethinks he would like
to see, he is referred to a real estate
agency. The agency then shows him
what the place really looks like.

or

'
.
"t
-.
, ,
SS n ''
; .
y '"
,: ,
""
,
r
_ . v

Cleveland ... .000 000
New York .. . .011 010
Dean and Hegan;
Rosar.

I

000-0 4 1
10x-4 10 0
Donald and

Brooklyn ......
St. Louis .......
Cincinnati ....
New York ......
Chicago'......
Pittsburgh
Boston.......
Philadelphia .

W
..58
..49
..45
..42
.41
..38
.37
.22

L
23
30
39
42
45
42
52
59

Pct.
.716
.620
.536
.500
.477
.475
.416
.272

GB
8
141/2
171/2
191/2
192
25
36

Iee Watbih9
makes no difference as long as
you are clad in a clever, cool,
Batiste gown. Styled for com-
fort and wear . . .
$ - 9
/4 off on Summer Cottons
J. H. COUSINS
218 South State
Across from State Theatre

Cards 7, 9, Phils 3, 4
Philadelphia . .000 100 020-3 9
St. Louis .....020 100 22x-7 11

3
1

Hoerst, Pearson (7), Nahem (8)
and Warren; Beazley and W. Cooper.
Philadelphia ..100 200 100-4 7 5
St. Louis .....100 107 00x-9 11 1
Podgajny, Beck (6) Naylor (8) and
Warren; Dickson and O'Dea.

Thursday's Games
New York at Pittsburgh, night
Boston at Cincinnati, night
Philadelphia at St. Louis, night
Brooklyn at Chicago (2)
Intramural Softball
Phi Sigma Delta .............11
Theta Xi..................10
Beta Theta Pi ................ 7
Phi Rho Sigma .............. 15
Phi Gamma Delta .............6
Pi Lambda Phi..............24

-n
oamwnei u +..,,,.

Bookbinding Scraps
scewd Into Jacket
Scraps of University Library leath-
er are in the Army now. Seventy-
five pounds of left over leather from
the Bookbinding departme-nt of the
University Library were delivered to
Mrs. Charles E. Koella, chairman of
the Ann Arbor Windbreaker Group
to be made into jackets.
One of these, a woman's jacket,
was sent to the University of Michi-
gan Hospital Unit in Little Rock,
Arkansas. where it was given to the
Chief Nurse. Miss Margaret K. Schi-
fer, former instructor of nursing at
the University Hospital.
lIeep meet

-Starts Today-

Sigma Chi ................. .
Chi Phi ......................

7
6

[

ON APHID 22 the manufacture of Radios
was stopped. However, our present selection
of Stromberg Radio-Phonograph Combina-
tions is still complete at OPA prices. For an
instrument that will give carefree operation
long beyond the duration we suggest you
make your purchase soon.
Only a Stromberg-Carlson
gives you these 10 features
Model 1025 PF* an FM-AM radio-phonograph combination ..$300,
Also ? range of other models in authentic period designs.
Easy payment terms are available.

F

f:

Standard. short wave, and Fre-
quency Modulation programs...
(47 one dial, with one ct of controls'
2. Tay push button tuning for both
FM and standard broad casts.
3. Electric tuning eye for exact
manual tining.
4. Automatic drift compensator
that prevents "fading."
5. Separate bass and treble controls.

6. Widest range ofnatural tor# for
FM's greater scope.
7. "Full - floating," 12- inch
Speaker that ptevents tone dis-
tortion at any usable volume.
a. Automatic record changer.
9. Permanent point pick-up - no
needles to change'
10. Record storage space, with six
handsome albums.

Hear No. 1025-PF* (above) on any program or record, and

', 11

11111

I

X... Ia 9.1 L ..IA ...J A I/!,1... .aU..J ®.a a - a aftmook.

i

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