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July 15, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESAY, JUYLY 15, 14

THE, MICHIC"A DAILY

THE ~MICHTGAN DAILY

4 _ T

MAJOR LEAGUE RESULTS:
Borowy Pitches Two-Hitter
As YankeesWhip Tigers, 30

I I - ... ... - !Tt i

Fi

-'

The Cracker Barrel
By Mike Dnn
Daily Sports Editor

INTRAMURAL
,Sport Shots
By JACK FLAGLER

By HALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press Summaries
Sudden reversals of form are part
of what makes baseball interesting,
and on that score the week-end pro-j
vided plenty of interest.
A desultory Yankee team trimmed
its usual nemesis Detroit in three of
four contests, while the Boston Red
Sox, who have lately been the terror
of the lower half of the circuit,
dropped three straight to the second
division Browns.
It was ex-Fordhamite Hank Bor-
owy who whipped the Tigers yester-
day, and he did it in the grand man-
ner with a two-hit shutout, 3-0. This
victory, as all those of the. Yanks in
the last two weeks, depended upon
one man's efforts. Monday it was the
returning Red Rolfe who sparked
the Yanks and the day before it was
Spud Chandler.
The Bosox dropped their third to
the Browns 3-2 as Johnny Niggeling
twisted the booming Boston hitters
around his knuckle ball. Thus Joe
Cronin's boys dropped six games be-
hind-the Yanks.
In the National League, Lou Novi-
koff proved anew that he has over-
come any troubles that may have
bothered him when he first broke in
with the Cubs. As has happened
about every time the fifth-place Chi-
cagoars have won a game in the last
two months, the mad Russian belted
home the winning runs against the
New York Giants as Verne Olson won
a 3-0 shutout.
, orowy Blanks Tigers
NEW YORK, July 14.-(A)-The
powder puff hitting Detroit Tigers,
who usually are able to get at least
one run, were blanked on two hits
today by rookie Hank Borowy, who
pitched the World Champion New
York Yankees to a 3 to 0 victory, his
eighth against one defeat this year.
Detroit.......000 000 000-0 2 0
New York ....001 002 00x-3 6 0
Benton and Parsons; Borowy and
Rosar.
Browns Beat Red'Sox, 3-2
BOSTON, July 14.-()-Knuckle-
baller Johnny Niggeling wove an-
other spell over the Boston Red Sox

today by holding them to seven scat-
tered hits as his St. Louis Browns
swept a three-game series with a
3-2 victory. It was the third win
Niggeling has chalked up against the
Sockers this season while gaining
his seven triumphs.
St. Louis ...........000 300 000-3
Boston .............100 010 000-2
Cards Down Braves In II th,
ST. LOUIS, July 14.--(iP)The
fighting St. Louis Cardinals, who
never know when they're down,
staged another one of their explosive
last-minute ;rallies today to defeat
the Boston Braves, 7 to 5, after being
shut out cold for the first five in-
nings.
Boston ... .000 140 000 00-5 10 6
St. Louis . .000 003 020 02-7 13 1
Javery, Tost, Errickson and Kluttz;
M. Cooper, Moore (6), Krist (7) and
O'Dea, W. Cooper (8).
Cubs Beat Giants, 3-0
CHICAGO, July 14.-(AP)-The New
-York Giants made 11 hits today, get-
ting men on base in every inning,
but they couldn't score against Lefty
Vern Olsen and finally succumbed
3 to 0 to the Chicago Cubs for 01-
sen's sixth straight victory.
New York ... .000 000 000-0 11 2
"Chicago ......000 020 Olx-3 8 0
Koslo, Lohrman (7) and Danning;
Olsen an. 7ernandez.
Phils Surprise Reds, 2-1
CINCINNATI, July 14.-(P)-Ray
Starr hurled three-hit ball for Cin-
cinnati today but lost to Philadel-
phia, 2 to 1, on the strength of a fly
ball off the bat of Ruse Melton that
went for a two-run homer after two
Red outfielders collided and were
momentarily dazed.
Philadelphia . .000 020 000-2 3 0
Cincinnati .. . .000 100 000-1 7 1
Melton and Warren; Starr, Beggs
(9) and Lamanno.
Night Baseball
Brooklyn .....301 010 . 000-5 10 0
Pittsburgh ... .000 001 000-1 3 1
Wyatt and Owen; Klinger, Wilkie
(7) and Phelps.

r ,

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

(That pseudo-sports expert Halei
Champion thinks he can piame the
final standings in the Major Leagues
with the season only half gone. So
we told the cocky so-and-so to go
ahead-at your expense, not mine.
~ Mike)
This is a funny business, this pick-
ing winners and losers. But I've got
a sure thing in each classification.
Brooklyn will win and Philadelphia's
bumbling Phils will lose.
The Dodgers have got everything,
and if it wasn't for a dignified old
gentleman named Kenesaw Moun-
tain Landis, they would probably
hoist the 1942 National League
pennant tomorrow. Unfortunately,
such candid tactics are forbidden
and the customers will continue to
pour through the turnstiles under
the impression that they are
watching a pennant race.
Bums or heroes, the colorful hood-
lums from the banks of the Gowanus
have eyerything that it takes to win
a pennant-including a nine-game
lead. Even players expected to do
nothing for them. when the flag chase
started are now working miracles.
Sample of why the Dodgers are where
they are today is Lefty Larry French,
comebacker par-excellence who has
won ten straight. None of his vic-
tories were freaks either.
Next in line are the St. Louis
Cards, who have the pitching, field.
ing and hustle that wins pennants.
Unfortunately they do not have cer-
tain otherqualities to be found in
a top-notch ball club. They do not
have experience enough nor fire
enough. Most important they do not
have enough punch. But they should
still hold off the next club in order,
the Cincy Reds.
Deacon Bill MKechnie has a
mound corps that is the envy of
both leagues with such luminaries
as Vandermeer, Walters, Derringer
and Starr throwing curves and fast
balls for the Rhineland outfit ev-
ery day. But rookie Ray Lamanno
is the only Red that gets a hit of-
ten enough to still remember it
the, next time he comes to bat.
They're good enough for third.
Right now the New York Giants
have a strong hold on fourth place
which has been produced by such
renowned clouters as Jhnny Mize-
whose sale may have cost the Cards
a shot at the pennant-Mel Ott,
Babe Barna and young all-star Wil-
lard Marshall.
But I like Chicago's clumsy
Cubs. Please don't ask me to tell
you why. All they have is Lou
Novikoff who, no matter what they
say, is going to be one of the great
hitters of the decade, and Claude
Passeau, a rubber-arm whose work
has almost as much quality as
many less-frequently used chuck-
ers. The other assets that make me
give the Cubs fourth place are all
wrapped up in Jimmy Wilson, a
really fine manager who may get
some wins out of his young pitch-
ers, and Bill Nicholson, a clean-up
pian that knows fences are to be
broken down.
The Giants I give fifth because of
their power, certainly not because of
their highly uncertain hurling.
The Pirates, who many looked at
with favor as the season opened, are
at least anthe year away from the
first division. Only Bob Elliot and
Babe Phelps can really level ov the
horsehide and only Rip Sewell is a
consistent winner on the mound.
Eddie Miller is the only star in
seventh place Boston's blue heaven.
Oh, veteran Johnny Cooney is a
sort of a second-class twinkle, but
not enough to get Boston above
that seventh spot.
Bless them Phils. Death is getting
more certain, and so are taxes. But
the Phils are beyond such minor cer-
tainty. They are the one sure thing,
the one team whose abilities cannot

KEEP COOL!
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Plenty of Barbers . . . No Waiting
AIR-COOLED -
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatre

b be disputed. God bless you, peaceful
cellar dwellers. May you never ven-
ture higher.
The American League ... Come
on you Bosox. I alone in all Amer..
ica give you a good chance to win.
In fact I pick you to outhit those
Yanks down the home stretch and
then take a sound beating from the
Brooks in the series. Any team that
carries thumping Ted Williams,
bouncing Bobby Doerr, dashing
Dom DiMaggio and 'rookie of the
year' Johnny Pesky in its regular
lineup and then can shove the best
pinch-hitter in either league into
action at a moment's notice de-
serves consideration.
Rookie pitchers as good as Broad-
way Charley Wagner, Tex Hughson
and Hank Terry have strengthened
pinch-hitter Manager Joe Cronin's
lineup immeasurably. I think they
will nose out the Yanks, whose pitch-
ing is fast becoming of less than
championship calibre.
Spud Chandler and Hank Borowy
are still good for a win every five
days, but Bonham, Ruffing and
the others are uncertain of late.
Russo is apparently through and
take it from me, this Gomez is now
a seven-inning pitcher. It takes
both he and Fireman Johnny Mur-
phy to win a game that isn't called
by rain. The rest of the world
champs, with the highly excep-
tional case of Flash Gordon, are in
the kind of slump that gave the
Tigers a junior circuit pennant in
1940.
Third should go to the boys from
Detroit. Much of their power is gone,
but a lot of it is just latent. Rudy
York is a late season star as are
Barney McCosky, Pinky Higgins and
others.Their pitching is therbest in
the league. Hal Newhouser , Pire
Trucks, Tommy Bridges, Al Benton,
Hal White and others can really
pour that ball through there.
Fourth is Cleveland, who have
hard-hitting Les Fleming, compe-
tent-hurling Jim Bagby and won-
derful young manager Lou Boudreau,
who doesn't let his official duties in-
terfere with abang-up job of hit-
ting, fielding and sparking.
Led by rookie Vern Stephens,
who, next to Pesky, is one of the
finds of the year, the St. Louis
Browns may well give Cleveland a
still tussle. Having submariner El-
don Auker around doesn't hurt the
Brownie cause, which otherwise
suffers because it has an acute
shortage of nine-inning pitchers.
The White Sox from Chicago I
take over Connie Mack's Athletics
only because they are used to going
further on nothing. When Johnny
Rigney joined the Navy and Thorn-
ton Lee's arn went dead, the White
Sox were doomed-not to the cellar,
but to the second division.
Then came the A's because there
are no worse except Washington,
which is hopeless. The only team
that Washington could beat consis-
tently would be the Phils. The Sena-
tors have no infield, but the Phils
have neither an infield nor an out-
field. That's the way I see it and
the Lord help me if the Yanks win.
Shows at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Feature at:
1:00 - 3:00
5:00
5A7:00 - 9:00

A sultry summer softball season
gets under way this week with nine-
teen teams signed up in the frater-
nity league, six in the residence halls
bracket and seven independent out-
fits slated to round out the eight-
week school league. Games will be
played all this week in each of these
branches. Turnouts will depend
largely on the number of students
not enrolled in, or completely dis-
abled by PEM 21.
The winners of last year's summer
session crown, the Tigers, are back
again with their lineup fairly intact.
Leading them again this year will be
Larry Saltus. The Tigers' roster is
made up of high school coaches tak-
ing summer session physical educa-
tion courses.
Competition in the fraternity
league is expected to boil down to
largely the same clubs which went
to the semi-finals and finals last
spring. Chi Phi, Greek -champs at
present, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Phi
Delta Theta, strong contenders in
the past, will be back with strong
lineups. Relaxed eligibility rules
should make the competition doubly
keener.
Intramural activities won't be dead
in other sports either. The residence
halls tennis league will start tomor-
row with the breathren group open-
ing their net tourney the 23rd. Be-
sides these there will be an All-
Campus tournament later on for in-
dividual honors,
Golf will have its place in the form
of two tourneys; one, an all-campus
open affair, the other a meet for
summer session students.
Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

I

4I

W L
New York .......55 28
Boston .........48 33
Cleveland .......49 37
Detroit .........45 43
St. Louis ........41 43
Chicago ........34 46
Philadelphia . ...36 54
Washington.....30 54

Pet.
.663
.593
.570
.511
.488
.425
.400
.357

GB

6
71/2
121/2
141/2
191/2
221/2
251/

You have earned

Phone 8887

Tuesday's Results
New York 3, Detroit 0
St. Louis 3, Boston 2
Only games scheduled
NA* *
NATIONAL LEAGUE

FARMS FOR SALE
TWO MILES from city limits. 80
acres in good neighborhood. Re-
modeled brick farmhouse among
fine trees; large, attractive rooms;
hardwood floors; steam heat; two
baths. Two basement barns, silo,
garage, orchard. $14,500. Also oth-
er good farms, some with lakes.
Oril Ferguson, realtor, 928 Forest.
Phone 2-2839. 17c
WANTED TO RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE wanted. Three
or four bedrooms. Two master
baths. Southeast section.aOccu-
pancy September first. State rent.
Reply Box 100, Michigan Daily.
MISCELLANEOUS
TEACHER of shorthand or type-
writing or bookkeeping to ex-
change services for instruction In
bookkeeping, dictation, typewrit-
ing,kdictaphone or calculator.
Hamilton Business College, Wil-
liam at State. Phone 7831 or 4627.
14c

LOST and FOUND
PARKER green laminated fountain
pen on or near campus. Call Yoho,
6489. 15
MONEY LOST on campus Sunday.
Approximately $50. Reward. Find-
er please call Thor Reykdal, 2-1044.
14
EASTMAN KODAK, size 620, in
black leather case. Lost near
Nickel's Arcade. Reward. Call
Catherine Mosher, 4121, Ext. 2138.
18c
LADY'S navy blue patent leather
fitted purse. Containing identifica-
tion, currency and travelers checks.
Lost on Cedar Bend Drive or Clo-
verleaf Dairy on Broadway. Re-
ward. Return to Mrs. Harryman,
West Quadrangle.
RegisteredNurses Attention: Your
services are very much needed for
full time and part time duty. Come
in and talk it over' with us. Com-
munity Nursing Bureau. Beatrice
A. Hoban, Registrar. 401 Thomp-
son, 6515. 9c

Brooklyn ......
St. Louis ......
.Cincinnati .....
New York ......
Chicago .......
Pittsburgh
Boston........
Philadelphia . ...

W
57
48
44
42
41
37
36
22

L
23
30
38
41
44
42
51
58

Pct.
.713
.615
.537
.506
.482
.468
.414
.275

GB

8
141/2
161/2
182
192
24
34%/

Tuesday's Results
Chicago 3, New Fork 0
Brooklyn 5, Pittsburgh 1
St. Louis 7, Boston 5
Philadelphia 2, Cincinnati

1

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ENDING TODAY

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If so please call 2-3998 after 7:30
p.m. 9
FOR RENT
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