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July 19, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_THE MICHIGAN~ DAILY PAGE 1

Stewart K. Knox, Noted
Alumnus, Passes Away
Stewart K. Knox, Jr., '40, yesterday
announced that he would fly to his
late father's birthplace at Three Riv-
ers to settle the family estate.
Stewart K. Knox, Sr., '03E, died
June 28 at the age of 62. An expert
in hydraulic and sanitary engineer-
ing systems, he has headed his own
consulting . engineering firm since
1934. He directed the planning of
Fort Merritt and numerous housing
projects for the U.S. Housing Serv-
ice during World War I.

North Is Guest
At Hop Today
Special Tunes To Feature
'Yankee Doodle' Dane
Tunes strictly northern will be
featured from 9 to 12 p.m. today in
the League Ballroom, when Clark Mc-
Clellan and his orchestra strike up
the band. for the "Yankee Doodle"
hop to correspond with the "Dixie
Doodle," which attracted students
yesterday.
Eyesome hostesses will introduce
students who arrive without partners,
as for all the Summer Session dances.
Signed up, to date, are Eleanor Sal-
fingere, Ruth~Hilbert, Charlotte Hel-
iker, B. Selvin, Josephine Clancy,
Marilyn Vogel, Dorothy Vogel and
Ruth Reynolds.;
Catherine Plumb, Carol Jean O'-
Rourke, Barbara Schoepfle, Helen
Hagy, Carlisle Knott, Genevieve Ar-
nold, Ginny Decker, Rosetta Ramsey
and Charlotte Skene.
Planning the affair are Ruth Gram
and Nancy Bonisteel, who promise an
entertaining evening for both north-
erners and southerners attending.
Yesterday's special dance was pre-
ceded by a traditional watermelon cut
to honor students from the land of
cotton, and today the rival side will
be given a chance to express itself
in song and dance to even up the
score for another year.
Private Hank Gets Raise
FORT CUSTER, July 18. -('P)-
Private Henry Greenberg got a pay
raise today. The big Tiger outfielder
has been promoted to the grade of
private first class,twhich means2he
will get $27 a month instead of $21.

Prof Challenges All Teachers
To Steal Table Tennis Crown

III

. p bastei 's
PO"TPOURRI

I

A MAN'S MEAL
We leave the fancy frills to
those who like them. At the
Flautz Cafe you'll find top-
quality foods cooked to order
by chefs who know how to
cook. We specialize in cater-
ing to people who know good
food.

ANOTHER 800 votes for Harmon,
Evashevski, Frutig, Fritz, Sukup
and Kromer went rolling from Ann
Arbor to Chicago last night to help
the Wolverine's "big six" to crash the
College All-Star lineup for their
forthcoming battle with the Chicago
Bears.
The voting, by the way, ends at
midnight, July 29, so send your ballots
along.
Here are the latest voting re-
turns: Harmon is No. 2 among the
halfbacks with 104,172 trailing
Franck of Minnesota by about 2,000.
Evie is way out in front with 101,-
362 ballots, about 40,000 ahead of
his nearest competitor. Frutig is
fifth among the ends, Kromer is
24th among the halfbacks and Fritz
is still 20th among the guards. Su-
kup has as yet not appeared on the
Chicago Tribune list.
* * *
S0, AFTER 56 GAMES, they fin-
ally stopped the great DiMaggio
proving beyond a shadow of a doubt
that perpetual motion is still a thing
of the future. Probably there's no
one more relieved about the whole
thing than DiMaggio himself-after
all, he's going to be in baseball for
some years yet and he's got to save
at least a few accomplishments for
another season.
* * *
Dizzy Dean, now a St. Louis sports
announcer, has again told his pub-
lic that he's going to attempt an-
other come-back. Guess 01' Diz
just doesn't like talking when he's
being paid for it.
,. * *
IT SEEMS that "Two-Ton" Tony
Galento objected recently to see-
ing his fight with King Levinsky
bjlled as the "Battle of Bums," Which
all goes to prove that it's no fun be-
ing made a fool of unless you're being
well paid for your troubles.

CHAMP RICHTMEYER MANAGER BECK
* * * *

The Fldutz Cafe

122 W. Washington 7070
- On the Corner --

_ ... '

(Special to The Daily)
MT. PLEASANT, July 17.-An in-
tercollegiate table tennis league from
which college students are barred!
Right! And the only alternative?
The profs themselves!
Announcement of the College Pro-
fessors' Table Tennis League, still in
the formative stage, came this week
from the Central Michigan College
here, with the formal claiming of the
national championship among col-
lege professors by Dr. Cleon C. Richt-
meyer, director of the summer ses-
sion and head of the mathematics de-
partment at Central Michigan, shown
above (right) with Manager E. C.
Beck.
Richtmeyer, an avid table tennis
fan and for the past three years suc-
cessful defender of the campus title'
against all comers, profs and students
alike, has been persuaded to "branch
out."
Now, with Dr. E. C. Beck, head of
the English department at the col-
lege, as his manager, Richtmeyer is
being groomed for what both men
hope will become a state-wide, even

a nation wide, series of contests.
"There is too much piffle about col-
lege professors being a broken-down
flabby-muscled lot," said Beck, in an-
nouncing the League and claiming
the national table tennis title in the
college class for his colleague. "Here's
the opportunity to prove the notion
false and malicious."
Seriously, Beck maintained, with
all the present emphasis on intercol-
legiate sport among students, it
seemed that Michigan colleges were
missing a good bet in not holding
more friendly competition of one kind
and another among instructors and
professors.
"So," he added, "table tennis
seemed as good a place as any to
start."
Any college professor, instructor,
department head, dean, or even presi-
dent, who wishes to challenge Richt-
meyer's claim to the national table
tennis championship among college
professors is urged to write him or
Beck to arrange a match and settle
the question once and for all.

1 I -=

4-761-

J-- _ __ ....

New Budget
Is Approved
By Regents
XContinued from Page 1)

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tier love story will, be a
'stirring and magnificent'
,emotional experience
'for YOU!

I

Perkins, political
Mills, speech.

science and

Glen

I

Franz Russell Steinbacher was
made an instructor in aeronautical
engineering. In the medical school
new instructors are Robert Barton,
dermatology; Louis Baer, internal
medicine; Leonard Hamff, internal
medicine; Homer Howes, internal
medicine; George Jones, internal
medicine; Paul Runge, internal medi-
cine; Maurice Scurry, internal medi-
cine; David Foster, neurology; Allen
Barnes and Harry Jurow, obstetrics
and gynecology; Joseph Smith, oph-
thalmology; Joseph Farrior, otolaryn-
gology, and Samuel Spector, pedia-
trics.
Other new instructors will be Ber-
nard Diamond, psychiatry; Rober
Howell, psychiatry; Curtis Burge,
roentgenology; John Holt, roentgen-
ology and Claude Wilson, roentgen-
ology.
New instructors in surgery will be
Peter Crabtree, A. Jackson Day, Wil-
liam Fuller, Carl Moyer, Joseph Na-
dal, Hubert Stockwell, William Valk
and Marion White.
Raymond Early was made instruc-
tor of English in the education school
and Ruth Jane Kremers teacher of
physical education.
Ronald Gran was made instructor
of oral surgery and William Schaller
clinical instructor in complete den-
ture prosthesis in the dental school.
In the School of Music Edmund
Haines is new instructor in theory
of music and Russell Howland in wind
instruments. Harold Emmanuel Pear-
son was made instructor in epidem-
iology in the school of public health.
Club To Hold Dinner
The Graduate Club of the Ypsilan-
ti graduate division of the Univer-
sity will hold a dinner at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday in McKenney Hall, Ypsilan-
ti, Mrs. Marian Keiser announced
yesterday.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets,
Dr. Leonard A. Parr, Minister,
Willis B. Hunting, Director of Student
Activities,
Mrs. Mary McCall Stubbins, Director of
Music and Organist.
10:45 A.M. Services of Public Worship. Dr. Parr
will preach on the subject,
"Do You Wear Sackcloth?"
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw Avenue,
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister,
Lillian Dilts, Assistant,
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
10:45 A.M. Summer Session of Church School.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship and Holy Com-
munion - Sermon "The Sense of God" by
Dr. W. P. Lemon.
6:00 P.M. Sunday Evening Vespers- 6:00 P.M.
supper; 6:45 P.M.: Discussion on "How Does
God Speak To Us?" led by the minister.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State Street between Washington and Huron,
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares and
J. Edward Lantz,
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director.
Mary Eleanor Porter, organist.
9:30 A.M. Student Class. Prof. Kenneth G.
Hance, leader.
10:40 A.M. Church School for Nursery, Beginners
and Primary Departments. Young children
may be left in these departments during
Worship Service.
10:40 A.M. Worship Service. Dr. Charles W.
Brashares' subject is: "Toward a Christian
Peace."
6:00 P.M. Wesleyan Guild. Student Fellowship
and supper in the Wesley Foundation Assem-
bly Room. At 6:30 P.M. a discussion of the
theme of this morning's sermon will be held.
Dr. Brashares and students will participate.

Richard A. Rowland
presents
MISS BISHOP

I

MARTHA WILLIAM
SCO TT GARGAN

Program includes Sport-
light - Cartoon - News

1.

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Secret Agent X9 The G-Man Learns Respect! By Robert Storm

SWE L JAM YOU'VE WORED YOURSELF~
INTO, X-9 "- P051NO A,5 AN5-L ONE
OF OuR SE PLICAN
G ETTING TAK~EN ABOAD ONE Xs4
-CF OUg COUNTRY'S SUMARINES READY
K UERE CO44E51E CAPTAIN1! FOR
~~ILfNI/

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