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July 15, 1941 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TU

Students Work
In Surveying
At Camp Davis
Geologists Study Strata
And Structure Of Area;
Plot Cross Section Map
(Special to The Daily)
JACKSON, Wyo., July 14.-The be-
ginning of the fourth week of the
Camp Davis Summer Session finds
both engineers and geologists hard
at work.
The engineers have made a topo-
graphical survey of an area about a
mile from the camp where differences
in elevation of several hundred feet
were encountered. Since the com-
pletion of that project they have
been engaged in the surveys for a
highway about a mile in length. Suf-
ficient stakes have been set to enable'
a grading contractor to begin con-
struction.
On the trip from Ann Arbor to
Wyoming the geologists gathered suf-
ficient data to prepare a geological
cross-section of the country from the
Great Lakes to the Rocky Mountains.
Their evenings since arriving in camp
have been spent in plotting this cross-
section. During the day they have
been in the field, becoming acquaint-
ed with the strata and structure of
the Jackson Hole area.
Students 'of geology from several
other colleges are enrolled at the
camp. Among the institutions repre-
sented are Chicago, Colgate, Lafay-
ette, North Carolina and Ohio State.
Dr. E. W. Knight
To Lecture Today
In Education Series
The afternoon lecture of the School
of Education series on "State and
National Trends in Education" will
be given by Dr. Edgar W. Knight at
4:05 p.m. today in University High
School Auditorium.
Dr..Knight's lecture will be on the
topic, "The Educational Revival in
the Southern States." Dr. Knight is
Kenan Professor of Education at the
University of North Carolina where
he has been located since 1919. Gen-
erally recognized as one of the lead-
ing educational historians, he has
become the outstanding. authority on
the development of education in the
South. He has also served on many
educational investigations in the
United States as well as in China and
Iraq. "Twenty Centuries of Educa-
tion' is his gtest book published in
1940. He is also author of many
others.
Nearly 40,000 tons of cargo were
transported to Free China over the
Burma Road in a recent six-month
period.

Meredith Lauds Experimentation
By University Drama Groups
Rv. ( Fl1RTi' W AL ADEU ' 1

, Iy jiJZl..L VT W t.ELUA.UL
Real experimentation in theatre
work is possible only in the universi-
ties, Charles H. Meredith, director
of the Dock Street Theatre in
Charleston, S.C., and visiting direct-
or here of "The Contrast" which will
be presented this week by the speech
department's Michigan Repertory
Players, declared in an interview yes-
terday.
"The whole commercial theatre is
absolutely inhospitable to experimen-
tation," Mr. Meredith said. Even the
little theatres are unable to experi-
ment because of commercial restric-
tions dictated by the box office.
Nevertheless, the community the-
atre has promise, although it has a
big problem of development. Mr.
Meredith expressed the hope that the
universities would supply that de-
velopment with the capable theatre
personnel they are turning out.
Graduates trained in theatre work
are faced with the fact that there is
less room in both the, professional
and educational theatre. The only
field remaining, Mr. Meredith em-
phasized, where there are a great deal
of jobs to be had is in the community
theatre which is susceptible to de-
velopment.
The university is not only training
skilled workers, it must be remem-
bered, but it is also training audi-
ences. This is the logical develop-
ment of the extension of the univer-
- sity's influence over the community
and should not cease with graduation.
Mr. Meredith is a graduate of .the
School of the Theatre of the Carhe-

I

gie Institute. He has played in both
the professional Broadway Theatre
and silent moving pictures. After
playing in the silent films he made a
three-year study of the theatre as it
existed in Europe. It was there he
became interested in experinentation.
Returning to the United States he
again appeared in both Broadway
productions and Hollywood movies.
For the past 15 years he has directed
in little theatres in Santa Barbara,
New Orleans, Dallas and Charleston.
At the Dock Street Theatre in
Charleston he has been able to carry
out real experimentation because of
a Rockefeller grant for production
and also a fellowship grant to the
former Dubose Heyward for play
writing.
Mr. Meredith has also taught at
Southern Methodist University, a
Junior College in Dallas and the San-
ta Barbara State Normal School. At
the present time in addition to being
director of the Dock Street Theatre
he is also president of the Confeder-
ency of American Community The-
atres.
Dames To Meet
Michigan Dames will hold a bridge
party at .2 p.m. tomorrow in the
League. All wives of students and
internes are welcome to attend. This
will be the first in a series of weekly
sessions, to continue through the
Summer Session.

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
PICTURE
NEWS

4

ON THE L I S T E N I N G END-Henry Ford listens at-
tentively to his wife after the wedding of their second grandson,
Benson, and Miss Edith McNaughton at Grosse Point, Detroit
suburb. The wedding united two families in the auto industry.

Going-Out-of-Business Sale
40% Discount on Balance of
Musical Merchandise
Fixtures Selling at a Low Figure
6-Drawer National Cash Register
Large Double Door Safe
Office Desk and Chair
Show Cases and Wall Cases - Stid Oak
SCHAEBERLE Music House
533 East Liberty

BOSS OF BIG HOUSE
--Robert J. Kirby, 51 (above),
succeeds Lewis E. Lawes as war-
den of Sing Sing prison.

W H E R E R O M A N S OF OL D R E L A X E D-Ancient Romans used as a health resort this
now dried pjeral spring in Anatolia, Turkey. Odd form of salt crust was caused by drying of spring.

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Easier
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COOL
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4

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

TYPING
TYPING--Experienced. L. M. Hey-
wood, 414 Maynard St. Phone 5689.
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
in graduate school work. Mimeo-
graphing and notary public. 706
Oakland. 6327.
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Small Phi Beta Kappa pin.
Engraved B. Fisher on back. Call
Fisher, ph. 25-8671.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
LADY who wants to supplement in-
come. Business experience or full
time not necessary. . Box 10.
FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM, double with adjoin-
ing lavatory. Suite with private
bath and shower. 422 E. Washing-
ton.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Royal Standard Type-
writer. Will Sapp, Michigan Daily.
ENGLISH Setter Puppies. Regis-
tered. 3005 Plymouth Rd., Ph. 5132.
HELP WANTED
STUDENT to work for board. 523
Packard, Phone 2-2320.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
LAUNDRY: Students' laundry. Shirts
12c. Phone 4863 for other prices.
Cash and carry. Mrs. Richards.

ARBOR SPRINGS WATER
Phone 8270

:'

I

T H U N D E R 0 N T H E T U R4F-Hoofs pound furiously as the field hits the backstretch at Empire City in Yonkers, N. Y. Can.
Jones, ridden by Don Meade, who may be seen partially obscured at right, wearing goggles, came out of this pack to win.

I4

SILVER LAUNDRY
507 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Price List
(All articles washed and Ironed)
Shirts...................... .14
T~nd rchif-, - - -- - - -.-0

..........

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