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July 01, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y, JULY 1, 1941

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

I-M To Launch Huge' Summer Sports Program Next

;Week

e

In The Majors
AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York ......
Cleveland ......
Boston .......
Chicago .......
Detroit....;. ..
Philadelphia
Washington .
St. Louis.......

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Monday's Results
Chicago 7, Detroit 6
St. Louis 12, Cleveland 6
Tuesday's Games
Detroit at Chicago
Cleveland at St. Louis (night)
Washington at Phila. (night)
Boston at New York (2)
* *
NATIONAL LEAGUE

St. Louis ......
Brooklyn.......
New York ......
Cincinnati.....
Pittsburgh.....
Chicago.......
Boston........
Philadelphia ...

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a. P. blaustein's
PO TP OUR R I
POTPOURRI. a medley or mixture - Webster
BY WAY OF INTRODUCTION: Our Potpourri is going to live up to its
definition this summer containing everything in general and nothing
in particular. It will appear at irregular intervals throughout the next
eight weeks and, all other things being equal, will mainly concern itself,
with sports. But enough of that.
Biggest news on the Michigan sports front in the past fortnight has
been the retirement of the great Fielding H "Hurry Up" Yost from the
post of University athletic director and the appointment of grid coach
Herbert O. "Fritz" Crisler. Next in importance is the signing up of
Michigan's sophomore outfielder Dick Wakefield by the Detroit Tigers
for a reported $42,500. There's much more to Master Richard's story
than that but we'll save it for later.
On June 20 and 21 several Michigan trackmen visited the lovely little
vill ge of Palo Alto in California to compete for the National Collegiate
Athketic Association track and field championships. The University finished
in 11th place with a total of 8 117 points thanks to the efforts of Warren
Breidenbach and Don Canham. Breidenbach was second to Indiana's
Campbell Kane in the 880 while Canham high jumped 6 feet 23/ inches for
a sixth place tie.
AS was to be expected the University of Southern California walked
away with the title for the seventh successive time. The Trojans
crashed through with 812 points; Indiana was second with 50 while the
University of California came through with 49/.
And speaking of track reminds us that several Russians recently came
close to breaking Paul Robeson's record for running backwards. At least so
it seems from some newspaper reports we've seen of "orderly" Soviet "re-
treats."
By the way we have been told by several individuals that the com-
munistic elements in this country should be treated less causticly in the
future-it seems as though they've finally become respectable. Now we

%/
9s
111/2
15/2
16
20
271/

Monday's Results
New York 3, Boston 0 (12 in)
Brooklyn 9, Philadelphia 2
Tuesday's Games
New York at Boston
Philadelphia at Brooklyn
St. Louis at Pittsburgh
Waterman Gym Open
Waterman Gymnasium, open to
men students during the Summer
Session for exercise, will charge 50c
for locker fee and an additional 50c
for towel, fees, returnable-at the end
of the semester.
The gym will close at 5:30 p.m.
daily, with the building closing at
6 p.m-

O
Play For All'
Plan Includes
Ten Activities
All Men Students Eligible
To Participate; Deadline
For Entries Is Monday
Michigan's 14th annual summer
"Play For All" program under the
sponsorship of the Intramural De-
partment will get under way next
week with a program calling for
competitive play in ten sports and
non-competitive activity in several
more.
In order to get the entire program
started as soon as possible, A A
James, supervisor of I-M sports dur-
ing the Summer Session, urged all-
men students yesterday to fill out
the Sports Entry Blank on this page
and send them in within the week.
The deadline for entries will be 5
p.m. Monday, July 7.
Although plans have been made to
begin activities some time late next
week, Director James announced that
exact dates will not be determined
until the entries are received. Sche-
dules for all sports will be listed in
The Daily as soon as they are re-
ceived.
Softball Heads List
Heading the list of sports will be
softball and either two or three
leagues, each with eight teams, will
be formed. At the end of the Sum-
mer Session the pennant winners
will hold a "Little Wold Series" for
the championship of the University.
An All-Star game, such as was held
last year, may also be played.
The Sports Building pool, home of
America's greatest collegiate swim-
ming teams, will be the scene of
weekly competitive tournaments and
several links matches will be held on
the University's own championship
course.
Singles and doubles 8ompetition
will be offered in tennis, hand-ball
and horseshoe pitching and several
squash, table tennis, badminton and
codeball tourneys will be scheduled.
During the week the I-M Building
will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
although all sports activities will end
at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday the Build-
ing will close at 6 p.m., a half hour
after all sports are ended. The I-M
will be closed on Sundays and holi-
days.
Pool Oen
Mr. James also announced that
the swimming pool would be open
from 10:30 a.m. to noon and from 3
to 5:30 p.m. daily.-
The I-M staff will draw up all
schedules, officiate at the various
games and matches and will supply
all equipment except that needed for
tennis, squash, badminton, horseshoe
pitching and codeball. The necessary
apparatus for these sports, however,
will be available for rental in the
'cage" in the Sports Building.
All winners in all sports will be
awarded Intramural ribbons. The
official intramural medals, cups,
statuettes and plaques will be made
available to winners and runners-up
who desire them at cost price.

Coach Crisler Succeeds Yost
As University's Athletic Head

BY A. P. BLAUSTEIN
On June 20 the Board of Regents
officially brought to a close the ath-
letic career of one of football's great-
est immortals when Fielding H. "Hur-'
ry Up" Yost was retired from the post
of athletic director and grid coach
Herbert O. "Fritz" Crisler was chosen
as his successor.
The move came as a surprise to no
one. Yost reached the age of 70 on
April -30 and therefore had to auto-
matically retire at the end of the
school year; Crisler was his logical
successor.
"Fritz" was assistant athletic di-
rector of Chicago from the time he
received his degree in 1922 until 1930.
During the next two years he was
football coach and athletic director
at Minnesota and until he came here
in 1938 held those same posts at
Princeton.
Since 1901, Yost, who is affection-
ately known as the "Grand Old Man,"
has been intimately associated with
the University. It was in that year
that the first of his famed "point-a-
minute" teams won all of its 11
games and scored 550 points while
holding its opponents scoreless.
His record? Here is a paragraph
from the University Athletic News
which sums it all up:
"In all, Yost coached 25 Michigan
teaems-1901 through 1906 with the,
single exception of the 1924 team.
In these 25 years under Yost the Wol-
verines won 164 games, tied 10 and
lost 29. They scored 5,380 points to
800 for their opponents. Eight times
they won or tied for the champion-
ship of the Big Ten-and during 11
of the 25 years Michigan was not a
member of the Conference. This'
was 1907 through 1917.'
Although in 1901 he had the am-
bition "to coach across the contin-
ent and settle in California," the
chance to coach at the University

"FRITZ" CRISLER
changed his mind-and he has never
been sorry. 1
The record was winning 57 foot-
ball games, losing eight and tieing
only three. And Yost came through.
When the University established
its department of physical education
in 1921, Yost was made Director of
Athletics and has since that time
built out of athletic revenue a plant
which is worth approximately $4,000,-
000. He is responsibile for the Mich-
igan Stadium, which incidentally
holds 87,000 persons, the Sports
Building, the Yost Field House, the
Women's Athletic Building, the 18-
hole University golf course and the
Michigan Ice Rink.
Crisler received his post at Chi-
cago after a brilliant college career
there where he was named as an
All-American end, an All-Confer-
ence basketball guard and qualified
for Phi Beta Kappa.

All-Star Team
Is Announced
NEW YORK, June 30.-(,'P)-The
National League squad for baseball's
All-Star game July 8 at Detroit was
announced today, with 15 members
of last year's victorious team again
on the honor roll.
Pitchers-Bucky Walters and Paul
Derringer, Cincinnati; Whitlow Wy-
att, Brooklyn; Lon Warneke, St.
Louis; Carl Hubbell, New York
Claude Passeau, Chicago, and Cy
Blanton, Philadelphia.
Catchers-Al Lopez, Pittsburgh;
Harry Danning, New York, and
Mickey Owen, Brooklyn.
Infielders--Johnny Mize, St. Louis;
Billy Herman and Harry Lavagetto,
Brooklyn; Linus Frey and Frank Mc-
Cormick, Cincinnati;. Stan Hack,
Chicago; Arky Vaughan, Pittsburgh,
and Eddie Miller, Boston.
Outfielders-Pete Reiser and Joe
Medwick, Brooklyn; Terry Moore
and Enos Slaughter, St. Louis; Bob
Elliott, Pittsburgh; Bill Nicholson,
Chicago, and Mel Ott, New York..
WELCOME:
SUMMER STUDENTS
Our fan-doled, modernly equipped
shop is for your comfort and satis-
faction. The environment is typi-
cally MICHIGAN for particular men
and women who desire the best in
the latest methods of barbering.
we specialize in personality hair
styling, scalp treatments, facials,
and "crew" cuts.
Dascola Barbers
L Keep A-Head of Your Hair"
LIBERTY OFF STATE

are beginning to wonder whether or:
lifted.
DOTS AND DASHES: Michigan
and Ohio State finished in a
tie for runner-up honors in the
Big Ten Golf Meet in Chicago on
June 19 . ... four-man teams from
both schools made 1,268 strokes for
the 72 holes of play . . . . Illinois
was first with 1,228 strokes.
Individual star was the Illini's
Alex Welsh who finished the four
rounds with 297 strokes . . . . his
teammate, Dick Wolfley, was sec-
ond with 300 while Michigan's Ben
Smith scored 301 strokes to tie
Johnny Holstom, also of Illinois,
for third place.
In the National Intercollegiate
golf championship matches in Col-
umbus last week, Smith was the
only University man to qualify . .
he was eliminated in the second
round by the Michigan State ace,
William Zylstra .... the latter, in-
cidentally, was the only dark horse
among the survivors. I
Golf enthusiasts who are new
to Ann Arbor might also be inter-
ested to know that the University

not the ASU suspension is going to be
" course here is one of the finest in
the state . . . . it is laid out over
the beautiful hills south of the city
and leaves little to be desired-
even by the golfer who wants the
best.
Prof. Benjamin Bailey of the
electrical engineering department
made a little golfing history of his
own the other day by scoring a hole
in one ..... the scene was the 135-
yard third hole of the Ann Arbor
Golf Course . .w. . the iron was a
no. 5 .... witnesses were the rest
of the foursome, Prof. A. H. Lovell
of the engineering college, Prof.
Chester Dawes of Harvard Univer-
sity and Harry Potter of Ann
Arbor.
Getting back to track again:
Breidenbach and the University
relay quartet were named as All-
Americans a few days ago by the
National Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation . . . . the relay team com-
prises Breidenbach, Bob Ufer, Jack
a Leutritz and Al Thomas.

t

U EyE il
is the perfect
Hot Weather refreshment

This is the month you
beg for, mercy.
acF°°K

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I

Some baseball teams seem to read Grantland Rice's sports column
while others don't. It seems that the same day he wrote that the Yankees
and Cards would be the World Series contenders the New York club climbed
into first place and St. Louis fell into a tie with the Flatbush Floogies. We
hope lie's wrong. A few months ago we stuck out our necks and said that
Feller was going to pitch the Indians to the top of the American League
and that Durocher was going to talk his boys into the flag. Well, we still
1..

IV

(11

+.. -

2).Jal

800

- -

FOR DELIVERY SERVICE

Beer Vault
303 North Fifth Ave.

z
l

thinK so. v
DiMaggio Breaks Record
In case you didn't know it, Joe
DiMaggio of the New York Yankees
hit safely in his 42nd straight game
in a doubleheader Sunday, topping
previous records set by Ty Cobb, who
hit in 40 consecutive games and
George Sisler, who hit in 41 consecu-
tive games.

-L

7je6Illene/ P/del
J/nn ror %/7o6t Jamouj
IRetaurant ...
There's nothing better for your health than the
enjoyment of fine food served in a cool, distinctive
atmosphere. Achieving excellence in both food and
service chartcterizes the ALLENEL policy at all
times. It is this high standard, together with the ap-
peal certain ALLENEL dishes have because of their
unique and delicious flavor, t i t makes the ALLENEL
Hotel cuisine so famous.
For Instance:
* Broiled U.S. Prime Steak
s Fresh Broiled Lobsjers
0 Guinea Hen
t Broiled or Fried tWhole Chicken
Capon Chicken

-u

Fireworks aren't confined to the fourth of
July. The old sun will blaze away-week in
and week out - celebrating summertime,
and you'll be asking yourself if you can take
it . , . For answer - might we suggest that
you step this way and -
SLIP INTO APALM BEACH
IN THE NEWICILWEAVE
The greatest heat buster of Summer - for
town, travel and vacation. Cool and light
as a snowdrift, and smarter than many a
suit that's twice its weight. Shown in new

.iI

... .....

Tans, Blues and Grays-
and astonishingly priced at

$17.75

At

Ease!

Dress cooly and comfortably in STEIN BLOCH TROPI-
CAL WORSTED fabrics for summer. They hold the
shape and give that cool, calm and collected look that

ICICLE WEAVE SLACKS ARE $5.50

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