100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 16, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-08-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AUGUST 16, 1941

TrHrE MICHIGAN DAILY

N

PAGE F

I I

Old Library Was The Campus
Center In Days Of Yesteryear
Back in the days before blush andofellow standing at the opposite room
bustle disappeared from camp3us, and heard-and only the blessed darkness
Michigan maid was still coy, tradi- concealed his blushes.
tion demanded-and librarians exhort First Library Building
-that Ed and Coed occupy differ- The old library, with its ivy-cov-
ent sides of study tables in the old ered walls, was the first of Michigan's
library. real library buildings. Michigan's
The old library, with its twin tow- first library-all 12 volumes of it-
ers, was the real center of the cam- was kept in the Detroit home of C. C.
pus in those days. Not unlike a river Trowbridge, secrtary to the Board
steamboat in shape, the building was of Regents. When it was moved to
impressive with its many appendages. Ann Arbor, it was shunted around
In ope tower was the old University from building to building, until the
clock, in the other the famous chimes, need for a separate library became
modelled after those of Jesus College, so imperative that in 1881 $100,000
England. was appropriated for that purpose.
Chimes Herald Day The building was dedicated in 1883.
Twice a day, at 5:27 and 7:27, the The old building withstood three
chimerical melodies rang out over fires, and under the care bf Byron
Ann Arbor, heralding the arrival and A. "Pa" Finney, '71, librarian,, served
departure of day and many a senti- until 1915 when appropriations were
mental undergraduate shed an extra made for the present library. "Pa"
tear in his beer at the sound. wasn't around to work in the new li-
The library, however, is best re- brary, however, for in 1916 he re-
membered for its whispering gallery, tired on a Carnegie pension.
a long, dark, low . roon running One of the largest libraries in the
around the dome. The least whisper west, with its 250,000 volumes, the
in one end of the 'room could be heard cld building is ?best remembered for
quite clearly anywhere in the room. its many traditions--the whispering
Once, they say, a young lady from gallery, the famous old chimes, and
Ypsilanti ventured to Ann Arbor on "Pa" Finney.
a blind date. Standing at one end of ----
the room with her girl friend, >he Population of the Japanese Em-
whispered a few choice remarks about pire in 1940 was 105,26$,101, the De-
her date for the evening. The hapless partment of Commerce says.
rH UTZEL's
H ANN ARBOR

Highway Bill
Is Approved
By Senators
Legislation Passes Upper
Body On Voice Vote; Few
Members Are Present
WASHINGTON, Aug. 15.-P)
Senator Vandenberg (Rep-Mich.)
aided by a baseball game and a scar-
city of Senators, today forced a $50,
000,000 slash in a $245,000,000 de-
fense highway bill.
The measure, which was finall
passed and sent to the House, was
substitute for a $320,000,000 bill ve-
toed recently by President Roosevelt.
and Vandenberg, frequent adminis-
tration critic, chided the Democratic
majority by begging them "to trust
the President."
When. Senator McKellar (Dem. -
Tenn.) and Hayden (Dem.-Ariz.)
sponsors of the road measure, an'
majority leader Barkley (Dem.-Ky.)
finally agreed to a $50,000,000 re-
duction, the measure sped through or
a voice vote.
The $195,000,000 woud be distribu-
ted as follows: $50,000,000 to be allo-
cated among the states for strategic
highways, with the Federal govern-
ment paying three-fourths of the
cost and states one-fourth; $25,000,-
000 to be used for improving bridges
and other highway features and to
be allocated by defense officials on
te same payment basis; $100,000,000
for access roads to be allocated by
the President; $10,000,000 for light
landings for airplanes along high-
ways; $10,000,000 for highway engi-
neering surveys.
Priggs Strike
Is Brought
To Settlement
DETROIT, Aug. 15.-()-A two-
day dispute in the Briggs Manufac-
turing Company's press department
which made idle a maximum of 17,000
men there and at Chrysler Corpora-
tion's Plymouth division was settled
with the return of tonight's shifts to
both plants.
The settlement was reached at a
conference of Briggs representatives
and officials of the United Automo-
bile Workers (CIO), during which the
Union demanded reinstatement of
three union shop stewards.
Union spokesmen said they were
rehired. Company officials declined
to comment.
About 4,500 employees were sent
home by the Briggs management
earlier-today, and shortly afterward
lack of sufficient parts supplied by
Briggs forced the Plymouth plant to
turn away 5,000 workers. Yesterday
the number idle reached 17,000.
The work stoppages began, com-
pany officials said, with employe
walkouts protesting the disciplining
of a shop steward who had incited a
slowdown in two departments.
In The Majors
AMERICAN LEAGUE

A 'Plastic Lizzie' Now - What's The World

Coming

To?

0

Budget Head
Hits Expenses
Of Andiersoni.
Budget Of Prison Is Cited
As Example Of High
State Maintenance Costs
LANSING, Aug. 15. - A- State
Budget Director Leo J. Nowicki, cri-
ticizing current maintenance allow-
ances granted employes in state in-
stitutions, today seized upon the
June food budget of Warden Simon
R. Anderson of the Marquette
Branch Prison as an example of
what he condemned.
He sadi Anderson, by his own re-
port, obtained $201 worth of food
from the prison commissary during
June for a family of four. The War-
den drew 27 pounds of meat, 35 dozen
eggs and a wide variety of food items.
Additional Allowances
"The head of this institution, in
addition, gets a salary, a mainteznance
allowance, a residence, maid service,
heat, utilities, laundry service and
transportation at the expense of the
state," Nowicki told the Civil Serv-
ice Commission and Governor Van
Wagoner.
"I don't know what he would do
with all that fod even if he had twice
the family he reports, but I know it's
too much," Nowicki said. "I want to
put these institutional people on a
flat maintenance rate and make them
stick to it."
The corrections department said
Anderson was paid $400 a month sal-
ary and $125 a rgonth maintenance
allowance, in addition to the items
Nowicki enumerated.
Made Renorts
"I'll say this much for Warden
I Anderson, Nowicki said. "My pre-
decessor, Gus T. Hartman, requested
all institutional heads to report
monthly the', amount of food they
drew from commissaries. Warden
Anderson regularly makes his report.
Warden Warren 'J.Dodge of the Ionia.
Reformatory hasn't reported very
often and Warden Harry Jackson
of the State Prison of Southern
Michigan never has reported, as far
as our records show."

The plastic automobile upon which Henry Ford (r ight) has been working for two years was displayed in
Dearborn, suburb of Detroit. Robert A. Boyer (left), who is in charge of Ford plastics developments, pointed
out that the plastic4car is still in an experimental stage.4

,i

Clothespins

Lei ujs setY0~e

(By The Associated Press)
CAMP HUNTER LIGGETT, Calif.
--Ordinary domestic clothespins, the
kind with wire hinges, have become
instruments of violent destruction in
modern warfare.
Fourth Army engineers on maneu-
vers here used clothespins as firing
mechanisms for antipersonnel mines
that spew eight-penny nails into un-
suspecting enemy troops.' These
clothespin mines can be hastily made
in the field.
The unique mechanism was devel-
oped by the 18th Engineers from
Vancouver, Wash.,All that'is needed
for one of the mines is a clothespin,
two flashlight batteries, some copper
wire, a few nails, adhesive tape and
a small block of TNT.
A wire loop is placed across the tail{
of the clothespin to hold the jaws

SpewDeath
.apart. A battery is wired to each side
of the pin, with wires leading from it
wrapped around the jaws. A trip
wire,' or loop, that the enemy is
counted on disturbing is fastened to
a loop on the pin's tail. When the
wire is tripped, the loop slips off, the
jaws snap, making contact and firingI
mine.
Strips of adhesive tape are placed
around the block of NT and nails are
perforated through it. When the
TNT explodes, the nails are spewed
from the mine. An 18thi Engineers
officer saw a nail driven sideways
through an inch-thick piece of oak
by such an explosion.
South Africa is using locally pro-
duced moving pictures for military
;nstruction.

Farmers Dropping
Corncob For Cigar,
Late Report Asserts
NEW YORK, Aug. 15.--RP)-While
a lot of farmers stick to their corn-
cob pipes, the' Cigar Institute of
America reported today itshad found
5,000,000 who now smoke cigars and
credited the switch to increased agri-
cultural income.
The institute said a survey showed
13,750,000 rural smokers compared
with 22,900,000 in towns and cities
and said 80 percent of American
families have tobacco in their bud!Z
gets.
In rural areas cigarettes account-
ed for 63.3 percent of the smokers;
in the cities 82.3 percent, the survey
showed.

ern
a ou kt to fL
xexz't di CAN,
'Woo
a _,.o the

l

- r nu se

;e. ex

,e ",_ hO
,t

h

.i u ,,ra-

Axes -x]L

.

v!l

ete ety"-

tXe aest

w :

Amendt

v'

N " ~'

1

,IIdIy
In

to~ e. ,e ou ,
~, sX1 x

GOODYEAR'S - In Ann Arbor Since 1888 .

11th 4b }

Five short blocks from the campus
you will find this shop. It is dif-
ferent- modern- air-conditioned
and specializing in better feminine
apparel at the prices you'll want to
pay.

^,

' ,;

q

I

V

The Downtow'n Shop for College Women

tw
W
New York .......78.
Cleveland .......59
Boston .. ..59
Chicago ........58
Detroit .........52
Philadelphia .... 5Q
Washington. ....46
St. Louis ... ......44

L
38
50
53
56
60
61
64
64

Pet. GB
.672
.541 15/2
.527 17
.509 19
.464 24

..

.450
.418
.407

25/2
29
30

,1.
0 0,0
f
V
.wpO1' 1 i ""' E

4 1

Super Specials for you
shoppers that you can
to miss!
SATURDAY ON
One Group of Odds and Ends

--®

week-end
't afford

Friday's Results
Washington 16, Boston 3 (called
end of seventh, 4vet grounds)
Philadelphia at New York, rain
Detroit at St. Louis, night
,Cleveland at Chicago, night
Saturday's Games
Detroit at St. Louis
Cleveland at Chicago
Boston at Washington
Philadelphia at New York
NATIONAL LEAGUE

LY!

St. Louis ......
Brooklyn
Pittsburgh ...
Cincinnati
New York
Chicago

w
..71
..70
..58
..58
..53
..48

L
39
39
48
48
53
63
64
78

Pet.
.645
.642
.547
.547
.500
.432
.413
.271

GB
%12
11
11
16
23%
25%1
40%12

DRESSES.
Better prints, sheers, dark crepes, cottons .
many good for Fall and Winter wear. Also formals.
'Sizes 9-17, 12-44. Values to $25.
$50

Boston.........45
Philadelphia ... .29

Friday's Results
Cincinnati 3, Chicago 1
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, rain
New York at Philadelphia, rain
Only Games Scheduled
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Cincinnati
Brooklyn at Boston
New York at Philadelphia
St. Louis at Pittsburgh
ATTENTION!
Free! Class of '45
An' Identification Case that
will hold your student cards!

taw ::'
''

GOODYEAR'S . . . general headquarters
you'll soon discover for campus clothes that
count. It's here you'll come for well-bred
classics (McMULLEN DRESSES and B. H
WRAGGE INTERCHANGEABLES, our star
attractions) . . for memorable date dresses
for shoes, including those favorite
casu6ls by JOYCE of CALIFORNTA ..for
that famous for wear and beauty BARBI-
ZON LINGERIE .... for CHARLES OF THE
RITZ TOILETRIES to keep you beautiful
for these and many other clofhes and
accessories that will make your college
career a joyous sudcess.

I

DRESSES

$2.95

:
Yt {/ L l..
IN 3U7
!
w_
? ,
-j% i

s " . 0

Attractive cottons in sizes 9-17, 12-44.
(Maternity Dresses included in both groups.)

A

Furnishings for your room, too! In our Shop of
Gifts and Occasional Furniture, accessories,

NO APPROVALS

ALL SALES FINAL

I,

Vii: zx?

.1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan