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July 29, 1941 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

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Talks, Reports $ . ". uPitauein s
For Meetings POTPO

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Round Table Discussions
On Medical Research
To Be Held At Center
A series of reports and talks have
been planned by doctors of the Latin-
American Summer Session for their
medical round table, held at 8 p.m..
each Wednesday at the International
Center.
Each doctor of the group during
the next four weeks will present a
sliort account of the particular re-
search in which he is engaged. Also,
in response to invitations from the
group, several members of the medi-
cal schiool faculty will spgak. Dr.
Reuben Kahn will meet with the
group tomorrow.
A child study clinic has been ar-
ranged for women of the Latin-
American Summer Session who may
be interested., Organized by Miss
Hazel G. Herringshaw, instructor of
public health nursing, and under the
general direction of Dr. Nathan Sinai
of the medical school, the group will
meet for the second time from 2 p.m.
to 4 p.m. today.
The legal round table seminar, ar-
ranged by the lawyers- of the Latin-
American Summer Session, will con-
tinue its meetings twice weekly with
one at 2 p.m. today. Saturday a
group of eight of the lawyers will be
taken by Prof. Burke Shartel of the
law school for a tour of Jackson pris-
on.
Thursday the entire Latin-American
Summer Session will travel to Bloom-
field Hills to visit the Cranbrook
Foundation as personal guests of Mr.
George Booth.
Miss White, Briggs
Nuptials Reported
Edith Elizabeth White, daughter of
A° Mr. and Mrs. T. R. White of Cedar,
and Fred W. Briggs, son of Mrs. Wal-
ter C. Briggs of Greenville, were mar-
ried in Lansing at 7 p.m. Friday by
the Rev. Glen Weimer of the May-
flower Church. Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
E. Harris of Lansing were their at-
tendants.
Mrs. Briggs is a student in the Uni-
versity this summer, expecting to get
her Master's Degree in Education.
Following the summer term the
couple will make their home in Green-
ville, where Mr. Briggs is in residence.

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Looking At ATrad itio .. .
O FAR every racing man in the country has placed the blame for Whirl-
away's defeat Saturday squarely upon the jinx of the famed Arlington
Park race track, the so-called "graveyard of champions." Being the most
superstitious people in the world (and even they'll admit that), the turf men
have been pointing to the adventures of Johnstown, Gallahadion and
Twenty Grand at this same track as much as to say that Whirlaway had
to lose-he was the odds-on favorite.
Johnstown had come to Arlington with the Derby and Belmont stakes
safely tucked in his saddlebags, Gallahadion had also won at Kentucky and
Twenty Grand had set a Derby mark--but none of them had a record to
compare with Whirlaway's. Before the 1941 turf king was beaten by the
comparatively obscure Attention, Whirlaway had acquired the Triple Crown,
winning the Preakness, Derby and Belmont prizes.
It was more than tradition,,however, that beat the famous Wright
entry. After all, if our memory serves us right, both Omaha and Gallant
Fox came through at Arlington after capturing the Triple Crown and
most experts are of the opinion that Whirlaway's performances had
yet to come up to the quality of these fast-steppers. Remember, it
wasn't so long ago when Whirlaway was hailed as the long-shot Derby
victor.
PERHAPS another factor in Whirlaway's defeat was the suspension of
Eddie Arcaro, one of the two or three top jockeys in the business, who
rode Whirlaway in his Kentucky, Belmont and Preakness victories. When
Arcaro was 'uled out of competition, 22-year-old Alfred Shelhamer was
given the Arlington assignment. Shelhamer, although an excellent jockey,
is very definitely ou't of Arcaro's class.
It may have been only tradition but, then again, we like to believe that
the horse is not quite as good as his press notices and that he was probably
down too fine for the contest.
A Bit Of 'Tennis ...
TWO of Michigan's net stars were entered in the recently completed De-
troit city tournament but neither of them came up to expectations. Jim
Tobin, last year's tennis captain and winner of the Public Parks Tourney
in Detroit, was seeded No. 1 and Max Gurman, a graduate student in
physical education here, was the fellow Tobin had to beat. '
But when the curtain rose on the final scene Gene Russell, captain-
elect of. Western Michigan College's tennis squad, and Kimbark Peterson,
a 37-year-old math prof at Lawrence Tech, were in there battling it out
for the title. Youth was served and the unseeded professor was vanquished.
Peterson defeated Tobin in five sets in one of the semi-finals while
Russell took the measure of Gurman in the other. Both Wolverines,
however, were in the doubles finals which saw Tobin and Dick Prakken
victorious over Gurman and Irv Blumenfield.
More On Wakefield-18 Bit
ONE OF the University's outstanding athletes, and a fellow who's as good
a friend of Wakefield as we and our Detroit letter-writing companion,
stopped us on the street Sunday and asked where we had obtained our in-
formation on Dick's "bad habits." We showed him the letter we receivedt
and told him what we knew about it but our athletic friend wasn't convinced.t
, "The bozo who wrote that letter should be horse-whipped," he said.-
"Wakefield has no more bad habits now than when he was at school and up
until a week before he left for Winston-Salem he hadn't even had a date
in Detroit."
No matter what his Detroit activities were, however, things aren't
quite the same in Winston-Salem. There, according to all reports, he 1
lives at the city's most expensive hotel, spends a little time playing t
billiards and goes to the movies occasionally-no more. Dick went 0 for t
4 in his first Piedmont League contest but came through with two hits 3
in four times at bat in his second.t
More On The All-Stars
VOTING for the College All-Star squad will end at midnight tonight and
the starting team will be announced by the Chicago Tribune Thursday.
At this writing Harmon is the individual star, with 952,427 votes, EvashevskiE
heads the quarterbacks, Frutig is fifth end, Fritz and Sukup are 19th and
22nd among the guards, and Kromer is 33rd halfback.t
Ruth HUbert, Brigham- Quad To Hold

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
The University Bureau of Appoint
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Service Examinations. Last date
for filing application is noted in each
case:
UNITED STATES CIVIL SERVICE
Medical Guard-Attendant, Salary
$1,620, Until further notice.
Medical Technical Assistant, $2,000,
Until further notice.
Dental Hygienist, $1,620, Until
further notice.
Treasury Enforcement Agent, $2,-
600, August 24, 1941.
Senior Superintendent of Building
Maintenance, $3,800, August 24, 1941.
Superintendent of Building Main-
tenance, $3,200, August 24, 1941.
Junior Superintendent Building
Maintenance, $2,600, August 24, 1941.
Senior Cook (Prison Service, Dept.
of Justice), $2,000, August 24, 1941.
Complete announcements on file
at the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall. Of-
fice hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has a call from an aircraft school for
several instructors. These are full
time jobs, forty-hour week basis, and
the starting salaries range from
$150.00 to $200.00 per month. Ameri-
can citizenship is necessary. The fol-
lowing positions are open:
Elecrical and Testing Department
-an instructor in engine testing with
the electric dynamometer. Mechani-
cal engineering graduate required.
'Instructor. in Industrial Electricity.
Electrical Engineering graduate with
much practical experience in AC and
DC motors.
Mechanical Engineer - instructor
in Internal Combustion Engines.
Chemical Engineer - capable of
teaching Metallurgy.
For further information, please get
(Continued oil Page 4)

Eastern Front 'Battle Lines
0 ido
FINLAND
HELSINKI
LEN NGRAD
SO
00
P LTfRV TEB K
MOLENSK
BOR .S.
MINSK a
-o UiSK
to
CE NAUI 8I
Arrows show direction of German thrusts on the three major fronts
of Russo-German conflict. Heavy black lines show area of Russian re-
sistance. On central front, Russian troops defending road to Moscow
were reported to have wiped out an entire German-infantry division
near Smolensk. Heavy fighting in north was reported around Porkhov,
150 miles south of Leningrad, and on southern front at Zhitomir, 75
miles west of Kiev.

P-rinepalEducational Gains In U. S.
Are .Described By William Bagley

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CAGNEY
DETTE
DAVIS
;nl TOGETHER II
A WARNER BROS. HIT with
STUART ERWIN. EUGENE PALLETTE ."JACK CARSON
GEORGE TOBIAS. HARRY DAVENPORT
Directed byWILLIAM KEIGHLEY
act.a Kay b Jllos J. andPIR,f . Ep.o. *lfo the St" tmb
Ksfth Eadond M. M.Msslmo, . Music by Mo, $ S1n.. n
Week Days 2-4-7-9 P.M.
- Today and Wednesday -

By PAUL CHRISTMANN
Dr. William C. Bagley, Professor
Emeritus of Education Teachers Col-
lege, Columbia University, in his lec-
ture yesterday aimed to summarize
the principal educational gains that
have been made in the development
of American education during recent
years.
He raised the question as to which
of these gains weushould attempt to
safeguard in the troublous times that
lie ahead. In attempting to answer
this, he pointed out certain criteria
that could be relied on as a basis for
judgment.
These are: a primary function of
American education will continue to
be the preservation and extension of
the ideals of American democracy
and what is now so frequently re-
ferred to as the "American Way of
Life;" any of the recent advances in
education that promise to sustain and
augment the productive capacities of
the American people, both agricultur-
al and industrial, should be safe-
guarded and extended; notable pro-
gress has been made in health edu-
cation-there should be no backward
movemdnt here.
't'he present crisis has shown clear-
ly the need for a high degree of effi-
ciency on the part of the workers in
a great many fields-not only high-
ly skilled craftsmen, but technologists
and technicians, physicians, psychia-
trists, nurses, and public health work-
ers, social-welfare workers and direc-
tors of personnel; a fundamental need
of a democracy, and especially of a
large-scale democracy, is a "commun-
ity of culture"-ideas, understand-
ings, and aspirations that are com-
mon to as large a proportion of the
population as possible.
Lists Gains
First: the development of the high
school as a non-selective school. Sec-
ondary education in many parts of
the country is as nearly universal to-
day as was elementary education at
the turn of the century. This devel-
opment has not been accomplished
without a relaxation of standards,
and to establish rigorous standards
for those members of each generation
that are competent to meet them and
to provide suitable high school pro-

Receive Conga Award
Winners of the conga contest at
the dance Saturday at the League
were Ruth Hilbert and Robert Brig-.
ham.
Upon the basis of gracefulness in
exceuting the sep, the judge, Nestor
Velasco, graduate student from Puer-
to Rico, who had demonstrated the
step with Peggy Whitker, chose the
dancers for the award.
Besides the dance demonstration
table games were played throughout
the evening in the ballrodm lobby.
= g

Music Hour

grams for the others constitutes the
most serious problem of American
education today.
Second: The continued upward ex-
pansion of mass-education into the
junior college, which has been for
some time the fastest growing divi-
sion of the educational system. In
this connection, the possibilities of
providing greatly improved facilities
for vocational and particularly semi-
professional education are worth not-
ing.
Third: The remarkable develop-
ment of adult education both through
adult classes and by means of the
radio.
Teacher Education Advanced
Fourth: Very substantial advances
in the education of teachers, especial-
ly, during the past 10 or 15 years. The
country as a whole 25 years ago gave
less attention to the education of
teachers, especially for the elemen-
tary schools, than did any other com-
parable nation. It stands now well
toward the top, although our profes-
sional schools for teachers still fail
to attract their fair share of the
Play Bridge Today
In League Contest
Novices and veterans in the field
of bridge-playing are welcome alike
at the duplicate bridge hour held
weekly, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays in the
League, under the chairmanship of
Barbara McIntyre, assistant to the
social adviser ofythe League.
Each tournament is a completed
one, and no scores are held over. For
the winners and runners-up in the.
East-West and North-South groups
there are weekly prizes. Though
many players attend regularly, win-
ners vary from week to week, ac-
cording to Miss McIntyre.
KEEP A-HEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
WITH A SCALP TREATMENT
Crew cut or personality hair style.
DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off State

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Record Concert To Feature
Sibelius Symphony
Sibelius' "Symphony No. 2" will be
the offering of the Boston Symphony
Orchestra, directed by Koussevitzky,
on the Strauss Library Music Hour, at
6:45 p.m. tomorrow in the Main
Lounge of the West Quadrangle.
This will be the second record con-
cert this week, yesterday's program
having consisted of an album by the
Chamber Music Society of Lower Ba-
sin Street, with the singing of Dinah
Shore, and the playing of Stravin-
sky's "The Fire Bird" by the Phila-
delphia Symphony, under Leopold
Stokowski.
Continuing the week's schedule will
be Beethoven's "Violin Concerto,"
with Heifetz and <the N.B.C. Sym-
phony, tomorrow, and Szostakowicz'
"Symphony No. 5," by the Philadel-
phia Orchestra.
Conducted by Cornelius D. Gall,
director of the Hamilton Community
Symphony and a graduate student
in the School of Music, these pro-
grams are open to all members of
the Summer Session.
Japan's trade with Europe has been
stalled by German-Russian hostili-
ties.

l

This is

one way to

NIGHT SPECIALS
FRANKFURTERS and POTATO SALAD
Rolls or Bread
Choice of Potato or Vegetable
Choice of a Salad or Dessert
Beverage
ROAST LOIN OF PORK

s" XE R N's °°A4 i
music and i
RAY BOLGER
JOHN CARROLL
"E HORTON
Frieda INESCORT RK0
.. "ni F r v RADIO "

keep cool - but there
is a better one.. .
TRY
ARBOR

Summer

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