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July 01, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1941-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 1, 1941

Educators To Convene Here
For International Confer

ence

I

(Continued from Page 1)
chez Ponton, Mexican Minister of
Education, and John G. Althouse of
the University of Toronto.
At 8 p.m. Sunday the Ford Sum-
mer Symphony Orchestra will give
a special concert in Hill Auditorium.
The first of the study groups will
be held at 9 a.m. Monday, in rooms
to be posted in the Rackham Build-
ing lobby. The study groups will be
held every ,day except Tuesday and
Saturday, and will deal with educa-
tion througlitout the world-modern
trends and the effects of the world
crisis on education. Distinguished.
educators will organize the groups.
Kallen To Speak
The general session at 11 a.m.
Monday will feature a talk on "De-
mocracy and Civilization" by Horace
Kallen of the School of Social Work.
he lecture-seminar series will be
held every afternoon except Tuesday
and Saturday, from 2 to 3 p.m. The
seminars are being held because the
Conference is giving a great deal of
attention to relations between the
American republics. The series will
deal exclusively with Latin America,
opening with a lecture by Waldo
Frank of the New School for Social
Research on "The Culture of Latin
America."
Mr. Frank will also deliver an ad-
dress at 7:45 p.m. Monday on "Fu-
ture Prospects for Democracy."
Clarence Streit, director of the Fed-
eral Union, New York, will speak on
the same program.
Tuesday Session
Tuesday night's.general session will
highlight talks on "America: Its Land
and Its People," by Jonathan Dan-
iels, Paul Engle and Carl Sandburg.
Wednesday at 11:00 a.m. the Hon-
orable Hu Shih, Chinese ambassador

to the United States, will discuss
"America and the Far East." Count
Carlo Szforza will lecture on the same
program. The evening session oil
Wednesday will highlight a talk by
Maurice Bonn of the University of
Pennsylvania on "Prospects for the
Future." Carlos Davila, former pres-
ident of Chile, will discuss "Cultural
Relations Between the Americas" on
the same program.
Thursday morning the general ses-
sion will be devoted to "Social Change
and Education," and the evening ses-
sion will deal with "Democracies of
the World."
Highlight of the Conference Fri-
day will be the dinner meeting of
members of the Fellowship and the
Progressive Education Association.
Henry A. Wallace, vice-president of
the United States, has been invited
to speak at the banquet.-
Saturdaymorning the special group
on "Education in Europe After Peace
Comes" will report. The group will
work on the subject during the en-
tire week of the Conference.
1 olk Festivals
Folks festivals will be held at 9
p.m. every day of the Conference,
featuring programs by folk groups
from various countries represented.
The first festival, Monday, will be
given by Mexican, Polish, Yugoslav,
Ukrainian and Norwegian folk dance
societies.
Ineconjunction with the Confer-
ence an international exhibit in chil-
dren's art will be shown daily from
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the Rackham
Building galleries.
Tuesday has been designated as
Parents' Day. On that day the for-
eign delegations will be shown
through Greenfield Village.
An information booth will be main-
tained in the lobby of the Rackham
Building during the entire confer-
ence.

F

Will Be Discussed,

Problems In Theoreti

I

Contemporary problems in theoret-
ical physics will be discussed again
this year in the Symposium on The-
oretical Physics under the direction
of the University physics department.
Six authorities on various phases
of modern physics will conduct the
lecture program of the Symposium in
the Rackham amphitheatre this sum-
mer.
Featured leczurer this summer will
be Prof. Wolfgang Pauli, formerly
professor of physics at the University
of Zurich, Switzerland, and now as-
sociated with the Institute for Ad-
vanced Study, Princeton University.
Professor Pauli is famed for his for-
mulation of the Pauli Exclusion Prin-
ciple and for other contributions to
the subject of nuclear physics. He
will discuss problems related to stu-
dies of atomic nucleo at 11 a.m.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday of
each week.
Prof. Frederick Seitz of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania will lecture
at 10 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday during the first four
weeks of the Summer Session. He

will discuss special topics
theory of solids.
Prof. Victor F. Weisskopf
University of Rochester will
a series of lectures on the 5
nuclear reactions, with pa
Dean Edmonson ToI
On Educational Plai
Dean J. B. Edmonson of t
cation school will speak on "1N
Planning for Education" at 4:
today in the University High
Auditorium.
The talk is one of a series or
and National Trends in Edu
a one hour credit course being
in the School of Education.
wide-spread interest in the
the course has been thrown
the general public.
Dean Edmonson is givin
!course, assisted by Leonard .
of the education school facul
tures will be given through
semester by members of the
and by guest lecturers.

c

ca1L Physics Brenda Frazier, Ex-Glamnour Girl, 'Marries Athlete
NEW YORK, June 30.-(P)-Bren- family friends, Kelly, who once played
ya Diana Duff Frazier, 20-year old professional football, had insisted.
In So i m hireswowntetteo lmu that Rev. Joseph F. Flannelly of St.
Ieirs o wo t d te o Glmour Patrick's Cathedral include the word
Girl No. 1, vowed today to love, "obey.'
honor and obey John Simms Kelly, Culminating a much-publicized ro-
in the emphasis on experimental observa- 31, Kentucky athlete, for life. mance that began in January193,
tions and their interpretation. He In a ceremony witnessed by 36 the wedding was held at 3:15 p.m.
conduct will speak at 11 a.m. on Tuesday and
yield of Thursday of the second and third
ticular weeks of the Summer Session. _
- Other lecturers scheduled for the
latter part of the summer include
Talk Dr. Leon Brillouin, formerly of the
mnnin College de France and later radio 2 e They Last!
communcations director for the
he edu- Vichy government. He is now a Iec-
Vationalturer on radio communications at
the University of Wisconsin. HeTa
:05 p.m. will lecture during the fifth week on The Finest Ta le Nodel
School the production of ultra short radio
waves. COMPLETE PHONOGRAPH
n "State Dr. Ladislaus Marton, formerly of
cation," the University of Brussels, and for w h Magn vox Speaker,
offered the past two years associated with
Due to the University of Pennsylvania andSss Cr sta
the RCA laboratories, is one of the a d C n tn
subject, pioneers in the development of the and Constant Speed Motor
open to electron microscope. He will speak
here during the fifth, sixth and sev-
g the enth weeks. H
Andrews Dr. Julian Schwinger of the Uni-
ty: Lec- versity of California will discuss prob-
out the lems of nuclear forces here during they
faculty fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh weeks
of the Summer Session.
No w. $.00
When our present supply is exhausted,
we must sell it at the new price of $22.50.
COME IN
AND LISTEN TO IT!
and while you're here, see our
ep Down!
RADIOS and
Complete Record Stock
aners
Radio &RecordSo
Ac.
an Theatre Bldg. 715 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.
OPPOSITE NORTH END OF CAMPUS
PHONE 3542

phone

University To Conduct Series

Of Excursions During Summer

(Continued from Page 1)

ges will be made on these trips for
bus and boat fare and meals.
Excursion three is a trip to the
Ford Company's River Rouge fac-
tory, to take place Wednesday, July
16.
The party will be shown the assem-
bly lines, open hearth furnaces and
the rolling mills. These will pro-
vide an opportunity to see typical
phases of the Ford Company working
techniques.
The fourth excursion will be a trip
to Niagara Falls and vicinity, leaving
Ann Arbor Friday, July 18 and re-
turning the following Monday morn-
ing.
This trip will be conducted by Prof.
I. D. Scott of the-University's geology
department, who will offer explana-
tions of the geological features to be
observed.
. The party will go to Detroit by bus
and take a boat to Buffalo, and from
there, a bus to the Falls. Trips
through the Cave of the Winds, and
rides on the Maid of the Mist will
be offered.
A short trip into Canada is includ-
ed in the itinerary, where the Whirl-
pool, Niagara Glen and the Cana-
dian Heights Park may be visited.
Excursion five will be a trip to
Greenfield Village at Dearborn. The
Village was created by Henry Ford
and is typical of American small
town life of 80 years ago.

Included in the Village are the
Menlo Park laboratory of Thomas
Edison and several other buildings
of historic interest. This is also a
museum of early America, with a
remarkable collection on transporta-
tion.
For the sixth excursion, students
will be taken to the schools of the
Cranbrook Foundation in Bloomfield
Hills.
Here, the party will have a chance
to go through the schools, the Insti-
tute of Science and the Christ
Church, all noted for their architec-
tural distinction and setting.
The seventh excursion will be a re-
turn trip to Greenfield Village for
those who were unable to attend the
fifth excursion.
The eighth excursion will take the
party to Jackson for a trip through
the State Prison. A tour through the
institution will be conducted and
prison officials will explain the con-
duct of the prison and its educational
program.
Ninth, and last of the excursions,
will be a trip to Put-In-Bay, Lake
Erie, with Professor Scott again in
charge to explain the geological fea-
tures of the trip.
Points of interest on the island in-
clude the caves, the geological his-
tory of the shore line and the 352 foot
monument to Commodore Perry,
commemorating the naval victory of
Lake Erie in 1813.

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