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July 10, 1940 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-07-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 WEDNESDAY, JULY 10, 1940

ilTee Off Today In I-Summer

Tournament

West s Homer InFirst Wins ForNL In All-Star Game,.4-0

C">

Managers Huddle With The Judge Before The

Game

Five National League Hurlers
Hold Americans To Three Hits
32,373 Witness First Shutout In All-Star History;
Red Ruffing Gives Up Four Hits In First Inning.
SPORTSMAN'S PARK, ST. LOUIS, July 9.-(-P)-The National League
humiliated the aces of the American League with the first shutout in the
eight-year history of the All-Star game today, 4 to 0, on magnificent 3-hit
pitching and a first inning home run by Max West of the Boston Bees.
A sweltering crowd of 32,373, slightly less than the capacity of the park,
thrilled at the throwing of five National League hurlers as they stifled
the ballyhooed batting of the Americans.
The only blows given up by the Paul Derringer, Bucky Walters and
Company were two hits to little Luke Appling of the Chicago White Sox
and one to Pitcher Buck Newsom of the Detroit Tigers.
The National Leaguers fielded faultlessly and collected seven safeties,
four of them in a surprising outburst4

'Patience' Tryouts Today
Final tryouts for principal roles
in the Michigan Repertory Players'
production of "Patience" by Gilbert
and Sullivan will be held at 5 p.m.
today in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Those who cannot attend
this tryout are urged to get in touch
with Prof. Valentine B. Windt of
the speech department as soon as
possible. .

Kenesaw Mountaini Landis (center), high commissioner of baseball, got together with the rival man-
agers as soon as he arrived in St. Louis for the Major League All-Star game. At I eft is Joe Cronin of the
Boston Red Sox, whobossed the American Leaguers, and at right Bill McKechnie of the Cincinnati Reds,
leader of the National League aggregation.

Blitzers Defeat Faculty, Tigers
Down Wolverines In Softball
The Blitzers and Tigers slugged and Stall comprised the winning bat-
out 14 and 15 runs respectively yes- tery.
terday to defeat the Faculty and In the fourth game of the day
Wolverines as the Trojans and Es- the Eskimos batted seven across as
kimos nosed out the Ten Old Men the Legal Eagles hit out six for
and Legal Eagles by one run in the their first win of the season. Bat-
opening day's play in the National teries for the game were Shepard
League. and Lucas for the winners and
Hughes, pitching for the Faculty, Townsend and Harry for the losers.
was the losing hurler in his game Tomorrow's games, all in the
against the Blitzers while Emmons American League, are between Phy-
limited the Faculty to two runs. Cox sics and Terrace Club, Curriculum
and Seeley 'were the catchers. Workshop and Buckeyes, Chemistry
The battery for the.Tigers in their and League Lugs and Super Dupers
one-sided slugfest was Popping and and Reds. Curriculum Workshop,
Dalgren, while Mitrovich and Av- Buckeyes, Chemistry and Reds all
france pitched and caught for the won their first games Monday.
losers. Popping held the Wolverines Teams in the National League will
to a scant two runs. see action again Thursday when the;
Loomis, caught by Munger, al- Tigers face the Faculty, the Wolver-
lowed only four Trojan runs, but it ines meet the Blitzers, the Trojans
was enough to beat out the Ten Old play the Eskimos and the Ten Old
Men who scored but three. Farnum Men compete with the Legal Eagles.

Man Mistakes Neighbor
For Cherry-Eating Bird
SALINE, Mich., July 9.-VP)-An-
noyed because "birds" were eating
his cherries, George Bernard fired
a shotgun charge into the cherry
tree.
Down tumbled no birds, but
Charles H. Miller, 72-year-old neigh-
bor, his face, neck and shoulders
riddled with lead pellets.
Bernard suddenly recalled he had
hired Miller to pick cherries.
Miller's injuries were reported not
serious.
)ormnitory Will Give Tea
Residents of Stockwell Hall and
their friends will be entertained at
a tea tomorrow afternoon from 4:00
to 5:30 p.m. in the dormitory. Miss
Edith Barnard and Miss Rosemary
Neuhaus will pour. Recordings will be
played.

off the New York Yankees' Red Ruff-
ing in the first inning.
The embittered senior circuit stars,
victors in only two of the seven pre-
vious All-Star tussles, never ' gave
their foes a chance.
Vaughan Leads Assault
Arky Vaughan of the Pittsburgh
Pirates, a goat in the beating the
National League took last summer,
led off the assault on Ruffing with
a scratch single over Joe Gordon's
head. Billy Herman of the Chicago
Cubs, who had a perfect day at the
plate with three hits, put on his fa-
vorite play, the hit and run, and sin-
gled Vaughan to third. Then West
lofted a 360-foot four-bagger into
the rightfield pavilion.
West, ironically, was hurt in the
first half of the next inning to con-
tinue the All-Star's string of casual-
ties. He crashed into the rightfield
wall in a desperate leap for a liner
by Appling and bruised his left hip,
apparently not seriously.
After that first inning flurry the
game settled down to a tight-rope
act and the only other run was
scored in the eighth inning with
Bobby Feller of Cleveland on the
mound. Feller took over in the sev-
enth.
Feller Walks Ott
He walked Mel Ott. of the New
York Giants on four straight balls
and after Frank McCormick of Cin-
cinnati had sacrificed the runner to
second, Catcher Hank Danning of
the New York Giants, the National
League's leading hitter, drove him
home with a sharp single to right-
field.
The only error of the game oc-
curred on this play as Catcher Rollie
Hemsley of the Indians let Lou Fin-
ney's throw roll through him and
Danning got to second but no dam-
age was caused.
Both Manager Bill McKechnie of
the Nationals and Joe Cronin of the
Americans captured the spirit of the
All-Star struggle as a show and 36
players got into the game, 22 for the
National League.

AB
Travis, Wash, 3b .... 3
Keltner, Clev. 3b .... 1
Williams, Bost., lf. .. 2
Finney, Bost., rf .... 0
Keller, N.Y., rf .......2
Greenberg, Det., If .. 2
DiMaggio, N.Y., cf ..4
Foxx, Bost., lb...... 3
Appling, Chi., ss .... 3
Boudreau, Clev., ss .. 0
Dickey, N.Y., c .. 1
Hayes, Phil., c.....1
Hemsley, Clev., c .... 1
Gordon, N.Y., 2b .... 2
Mack, Clev., 2b2.......
Ruffing, N.Y., p . 1
Newsom, Det., p ..... 1
Feller, Clev., p....... 1

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0l
0
0
0 l
1
0

What Happened Boys?
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Totals ..........29 0 3
NATIONAL LEAGUE

AB
Vaughan, Pitt, ss .... 3
Miller, Bost., ss ...... 1
Herman, Chi., 2b .... 3
Coscarart, Bkln., 2b .. 1
West, Bost., rf .... 1
Nicholson, Chi., rf .. 2
Ott, N.Y., rf......... 0
Mize, St.L., lb .......2
McCormick, Cin., lb .. 1
Lombardi, Cin., c .... 2
Phelps, Bklyn., c .... 0
Danning, N.Y., c .... 1
Medwick, Bklyn, If .. 2
J. Moore, N.Y., If .... 2
Lavagetto, Bklyn., 3b 2
May, Phil., 3b .......1
T. Moore, St.L., cf .. 3.
Derringer, Cin., p .. 1
Walters, Cin., p .... 0
Wyatt, Bklyn., p .... 1
French, Chi., p .... 0
Hubbell, N.Y., p .... 0
Totals.........29
American League . 000
National League .. 300

R
1
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1
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7:

A
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0

cept Sunday, 2-5 p.m. and 7-10 p.m.
Preliminary examinations for the
doctorate in English will be offered
on this schedule in 3217 A.H. at 9
to 12 a.m.
American Literature - Wednesday,
July 24.
English Literature, 1700-1900 - Sat-
urday, July '27.
English Literature, 1550-1700- Wed-
nesday, July 31.
English Literature, Beginnings to
1550 - Saturday, August 3.
All those who intend to take the
examinations should notify Profess-
or N. E. Nelson, 3232 A.H.
Deutsches Haus. Reservations
may still be made for meals at the
Deutsches Haus, luncheon 35 cents;
dinner 45 cents. Please make reserv-
ations at the German Office, 204
UH or with Dr. Otto G. Graf, 300
SW.
Students, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: Except under
extraordinary circumstances, courses
dropped after the THIRD week, Sat-
urday, July 13th, will be recorded
with a grade of E.
E. A. Walter
School of Education Students (Un-
dergraduate) : Courses dropped after
Saturday, July 13, will be recorded
with the grade of E except .under
extraordinary circumstances. No
course is considered officially dropped
unless it has been reported in the
office of the Registrar, Room 4, Uni-
versity Hall.
Teacher's Certificate Candidates
who expect to be recommended by
the Faculty of the School of Educa-
tion at the close of the Summer Ses-
sion should make application at this
of the School of Education, 1437
of the Schoo lof Education, 1437
U.E.S. (This notice does not include
School of Music students.)
International Center: Foreign stu-
dents in Summer Session who wish
help with their English should join
one of the non-credit classes offered
by the International Center. These
classes are given free to students who
will attend regularly. The progra4
for the summer is as follows:e
sMonday, 7 to 9. Latin-American
students.
Tuesday, 7 to 9. European and Far
Eastern students.
Thursday, 7 to 9. All students are
expected to attend this class for the
correction of pronunciation.
Friday, 7 to 9. European and Far
Eastern students.
Saturday. Hours to be arranged.
Latin-American students.
SPECIAL
or Ehea Weeh.

RADIO SPOTLIGHT
WJR WWJ WXYZ CKLW
750 KC - CBS 920 KC - NBC Red 1240 KC- NBC Blue 1030 KC - Mutual
Wednesday Afternoon
12:00 The Goldbergs The Old Dean News Ace Happy Gang
12:15 Life Beautiful Julia Blake Between Bookends "
12:30 Rgt. to Happin's Bradcast Christian Educ. News Ace
12:45 Road Of Life Man on the Street Fan On The Street Carters
1:00 Dr. Malone Light of the World Indiana Indigo Livestock Report
1:15 Joyce Jordan Grimm's Daughter Echoes of History Organist
1:30 Fletcher Wiley Valiant Lady Favorite Waltzes Melody Time
1:45 My Son And I Betty Crocker I Cheer Ui.p Gang
2:00 Society Girl Mary Marlin Orphans of Divorce Quiet Sanctuary
2:15 News Ma Perkins Honeymoon Hillf
2:30 Linda's Ist Love Pepper Young John's Other Wife Turf Reporter
2:45 Editor's D'ghter Vic and Sade Just Plain Bill Tiny Hill Orch.
3:00 Lone Journey Club Matinee Backstage Wife News
3:15 Mrs. Page Stella Dallas Melody; Turf
3:30 Woman 'o C'rge " Lorenzo Jones Jamboree
3:45 Alice Blair News Widder Brown
4:00 Kathleen Norris Features Girl Alone "
4:15 Golden Store" Malcolm Claire
4 :$0 Meet Miss Julia " Irene Wicker Miss Treat
4:45 "Scatter" Baines Tropical Moods Tea Dance
5:00 News-Musical Recording Show World News; Melody
5:15 Hollywood To Be Announced Turf Club
5:30 News-Review Dance Music Day In Review Ball Scores
5:45 World Today Lowell Thomas Bud Shaver Organist
Wednesday Evening

000 000-0
000 01*-4

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)

nights, July 10-13, in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. This is the third
production this summer of the Mich-
igan Repertory Players of the De-,
partment of Speech. Prices, 75c, 50c,
and 35c. Box office open from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. daily.
The Niagara Falls Excursion has
been arranged to accommodate Uni-
versity students who are American
Citizens for the weekend of July 12,
13, 14 and 15. The excursion will
include two trips into Canada; and
all features of the former excur-
sions except the visit to the power
plant. Mr. Kerr of the D and C Navi-
gation Company will be in the Sum-
mer Session Office on Thursday from
1 to 4 o'clock to sell tickets for all
transportation. All expenses will be
under $21.00.
Angell Hall Observatory Evenings.
If the sky is clear, the moon will be
shown through the telescopes of the

Students Observatory on the fifth
floor of Angell Hall, from 8:15 to 10
p.m., on the evenings of Friday, July
12th, and Saturday, July 13th. These
public evenings are restricted to stu-
dents in the Summer .Session.
Exhibition -of American Painting
presented by the graduate study pro-
gram in American Culture and Insti-
tutions is being held in the Rackham
Building through July 31, daily ex-
The Subway
NOON LUNCH
Wednesday, July 10
HOT OR COLD
PLATE LUNCH 30c
SANDWICH and FRESH FRUIT
SUNDAE SPECIALS 30c
SUBWAY COFFEE SHOPPE
North University at Thayer
Opp. Hill Auditorium

I

6:00 News
6:15 Inside of Sports
6:30 Dr. Meek
6:45"
7:00 Question Bee
7:15
7:30 Dr. Christian
7:45 News
8:00 Star Theatre
8:15"
8:30 Stadium Concert
8:45
9:00 Glenn Miller
9:15 Musical
9:30 News of the War
9:45 Melody Marvels
10:00 Amos 'n Andy
10:15 Lanny Ross
10:30 Adv. In Music
10:45 "
11:00 News
11:15 Jack Denny
11:30 News & Music
11:45 A
12:00 Al Kavelin Orch

Sport Review
C. C. Bradner
Bill Elliott
Sports Parade
Hollywood Party
Plantation Party
"~ 'm
Abbott & Costello
District Attorney
Kay Kyser College
Sports Exam.
Fred Waring
Dance Music
News
Dance Music
Eastwood Orch.
Westwood Orch.

Easy Aces
Mr. Keen-Tracer
The Lone Ranger
State Police Story
What To Do?
Green Hornet
The Factfinder
Harry Heilmann
Silhouettes
Radio Magic
Police Field Day
News Ace
Arden Wilson Orch
Baron Elliott Orch
"
Music You Want
Al Donahue Orch.
Dance Music

Rollin' Home
Dukedale Grocery
Tropic Com'ntary
News
Carson Robinson
Turner's Orch.
County Speaker
Question Box
Serenade
Shall Not Pass
News; Interlude
Lapp's Orch.
Canadian News
Winnipeg Symph.
Club, Reporter
Teagarden's Orch.
King's Orch.
Arnheim's Orch.

Chocolate
Nut
Sundae
l0C.

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How to feel

COMFORTABLE

11

and Look it!

L

Shows at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
Now Playing!

You'll want a shirt-and-slack outfit for
these hot summer days. A choice of popular
colors, these matching outfits have every-
thing. For sport and recreation-ideal for
class-room -wear.
Made of the finest, cool soft weave fabrics,

We make our own ice cream
and it's
DELICIOUS
Try some today!
Air Conditioned

1

-.. ...

ROB ~SOTHERN:'
Ros~N L~BOGART'

. w/- 1"Itliv l- -ft WE."m

em

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