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August 10, 1940 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-08-10

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PAGE TWENTY-TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1940

__

I

Freshmen Start
Activities Here
OnSept. 23
Open Orientation Progran
With Campus Tours,
General Convocations
(Continued from Page 19)

Federman, Stanton Miller, Donald
Stevenson, Tilten Batchelder, Win-
ston Cox, Robert Crane, Howard Ids-
eon, Alfred Darling, Ronald God-
bout, John Larson, Paul Sampson,
Gordon Critchell, Kenneth Calder,
Joseph Reed, Neal Seegert, William
Osborn, J. Paul Smith, Earl Radley,
George Shepard, William Harrelson,
Richard Ludwig.
Freshman Advisers
Freshman advisers in the archi-
tecture school are: Ralph Peterson,
William Harrison. For the School
of Music they are: Gordon Hardy,
Philip Malpas.
Engineering school advisers are:
Henry Fielding, Robert Wallace, Jack
Harwood, Jerome Brenner, Robert
Summerhays, Stanton Allen, William
Schomburg, Ray Allen, Jack Cooney,
George Weesner, Scott Ulrey, Arlie
Reagan, George Hogg, Frederick Wal-
ter, Lowell Moss, Keith Bronson,
Robert Hotchkiss, Richard Bennett,
William Downer, Theo Sharpe.
Student advisers for the literary
school transfer students are: William
Sessions, Thomas Armstrong, Wil-
liam Stuck, Henry Brown, Robert
Marks, Jack Grady, Henry Watson,
William Hastie, Robert Ulmer, George
Cornell, Michael Berman, Harold
Singer, Warren Solovich, Frank Col-
lins, Joseph Edelman, Joseph House,
James Krieger, Gordon Messner and
Gerald Goldstein.
Engine Advisers
Engineering transfer student ad-
visers are : David Shore, Vern Ken-
nedy, Richard Ebbets, Robert Mor-
rison, Robert Imboden, James Ed-
munds, and Charles Trick.
Forestry school advisers are Walter
Cofnok and Bernard Tauber. Only
architecture transfer adviser is Phelp
Hines. Neil Smith is the education
school transfer adviser. Music school
advisers are Forrest Bartlett and
Edward Ostroski. Dental school ad-
visers are Thomas Hanson and Jack-
son Bates.3

Dean Crawford
Has Followed
Varied Career
(Continued from Page 20)
versity of Colorado in 1912 with a
B.S. Degree in civil engineering, Dean
Crawford turned to railway engin-
eering, working for the Oregon Short
Line, Denver and Rio Grande and
the Illinois Central railroads in the
varying capacities of rodman, mason-
ry inspector, draftsman and instru-
ment man.
Returning to .the University of
Colorado in 1915, he held successive
posts there as assistant professor,
associate professor and professor of
civil engineering.
A captain, and later a major of
engineers in the Army, Dean Craw-
ford joined a combat regiment of
engineers in France during the war
and later served with the section of
the American Committee to Negoti-
ate Peace. Since 1921, he has been
successively lieutenant colonel and
colonel of engineers in the reserve
corps.
Transferring to the University of
Idaho in 1923, he became professor
of civil engineering there, and later
was named dean of the engineering
college and director of the Engineer-
ing Experiment Station at that Uni-
versity.
On leave of absence from 1933 to
1937 he served as state engineer and
inspection engineer for the Federal
Emergency Administration of Pub-
lic Works in Idaho. He was also
Idaho representative for the United
Naval ROTC
Group Begins
Activity Here
(Continued from Page 19)

Expenses Vary
At University
Non-Michigan Residents
Pay Higher Fees
Expenses incurred by the average
suent in attendance at the Uni-
versity will vary between $550 and
$710, depending upon the courses he
is taking and his place of residence,
according to figures released by the
University.
The following figures are calculat-
ed on the basis of a college year of
38 weks and includes registration fees
for two semesters, room, board and
books and instruments. Incidentals,
laundry, clothing and travel are not
included.
In the literary college, a Michigan
resident's expenses will run around
$550-$120 in registration fees, $50
for books and instruments, $230 for
board, and $150 room rent. An out-
state resident will pay around $630,
the difference being accounted for
in the higher registration fees he
must pay. In the engineering col-
lege, a Michigan resident will pay
about $600, while an outstate student
will pay $710.
Local Cooperative
Is Now Largest In
The United States
The Michigan Wolverine, coopera-
tiv6 eating club, largest student co-
operative in the United States, in
addition to its dining facilities, spon-
sors many social events for Michigan
students.
Dances are held every Sunday
night, and classical programs are
presented on Sunday mornings, in-
cluding Shakespeare recordings.
which are sponsored by Prof. Paul
Mueschke of the English department.
Symphonic records will also be pre-
sented.
The Wolverine also has Intramural
teams in all sports.
The Wolverine,which started in
1932 with 75 members in Lane Hall,
now occupies its own building and
has a membership of 950. The Wol-
verine is now worth $50,000, and the
cooperative had $100,000 worth of
sales last year.
States Coast and Geodetic Survey.
In 1937, he .became dean of the
School of Engineering and Architec-
ture at the University of Kansas,
where he remained until last month.
Active in many engineering soci-
eties, Dean Crawford was president of
the Northwest Scientific Society in
1933, national director of the Ameri-
can Society of Civil Engineers 1935-
38

CAMPUS

CHURCHES

Open House . .

. Friday, September

27

Services of Worship ... Sunday, September

29

I

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron

Friday, 8:00 p.m.
Roger Williams

Open House for students at the
Guild House, 503 East Huron.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Open House in Chapel Auditorium.
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 10:00 and 11:30 a.m.
Daily Mass: 7 and 8 a.m.

4

Sunday
10:30 a.m. Morning Church Service.
6:1 5 p.m. Meeting of students at Guild House.

_ II

University Has
Three Flying
Organizations
The University's three aviation or-
ganizations4 the Institute of Aeronau-
tical Sciences, the Flying Club and
the Glider Club, are planning a tri-
club exhibit during the first week
of the coming session.
The exhibit, which will be held in
the south show case in the East En-
gineering Building lobby, will con-
sist of a number of trophies won by
the Flying Club, several photographs
of the activities of the various groups,
models of the Michigan wind tunnel
and other aids to flying given by the
University and various charts explain-
ing the work of these 'groups.
The I.Ae.S. consists of men who
are interested in the technical side
of aviation who sponsor air shows
and lecture series here in addition
to devoting themselves to different
fields of aeronautical research.
Programs similar to those present-
ed by the Institute are also presented
by the Flying Club which also con-
ducts flying meets for University
students. At present the Michigan
club is the champion flying organi-
zation in the nation.
The activities of the Glider Club
are mostly local although some of
its members have attended various
gliding meets.

reserve training course. Before ac-
ceptance,, students must pass a rigid
physical examination similar to that
required by the U.S. Naval Academy.
Eligibility to membership in the
naval ROTC is limited to students
who are citizens of the United States,
not less than 14 years of age. Citi-
zenship must be substantiated by a
birth certificate or naturalization
papers. Premedical or predental stu-
dents are not eligible for enrollment.
During summer vacation students
will gain practical experience at sea
through a cruise on the Atlantic
Ocean in a battleship or destroyer.
All juniors are required to make this
cruise, and must agree to do so as a
requirement for their enrollment in
the Advance Group.

H I LLEL FOUNDATION
East University and Oakland
Saturday, 8:30 p.m. Freshman Party at Michigan
Wolverine.
Sunday, Open House all day.
October 2-3, Rosh Hashanah Services in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(DISCIPLES)
Tappan and Hill
Friday, 5:00 p.m. Picnic supper. Meet at the Guild
House, 438 Maynard, rain or shine.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
6:30 p.m. Disciples Guild at the Church. "Intro-
ducing the Guild to new students."

/lcome to the
MICHIGAN WOLVERINE
STUDENT COOPERATIVE, Inc.
THE STUDENTS' OWN DINING CLUB
OWNED AND OPERATED BY STUDENTS
20 Meals . . $4.75
(plus Sales Tax)
LIMITED MEMBERSHIP AVAILABLE
FRIENDLY COLLEGE ATMOSPHERE
... 209 South State Street*..

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine and Division
Friday, 8:00 p.m.
Informal Open House at Harris Hall, Episcopal
Student Center, State and Huron.
Sunday
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m. Introducing the Episcopal Student
Center at Michigan, Harris Hall.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Friday, 8:30 p.m. Informal party, games and dancing.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
4:00-6:00 p.m. Reception and Tea.

u . _ _ _

ZION AND TRINITY
LUTHERAN CHURCHES
TRINITY CHURCH: East William and Fifth
ZION CHURCH: East Washington and Fifth
PARISH HALL: 309 East Washington
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Open House at the Parish Hall.
Sunday
10:30 a.m. Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Lutheran Churches.
5:30 p.m. Lutheran Student Association at Parish
Hall. Social Hour and Supper.
6:45 p.m. Association Meeting with Speaker.

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty at Third
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Open House at the Church.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
3:00 p.m. Service of Consecration, picnic supper.
Students will meet at the Church.

I

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~1

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw near South University
Friday
6:00 p.m. Steak Roast at the Church.
8:00 p.m. Open House, entertainment and games.
Sunday
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
6:00 p.m. Guild Meeting and Supper at the Church.
Introducing the Guild to new students.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State at Washington and Huron
Friday
6:15 p.m. Dinner in the Social Room.
8:00 p.m. Party.
Sunday
9:30 a.m. Student Class in Student Assembly Room.
10:40 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
6:00 p.m. Wesleyan Guild Meeting with Fellowship
Supper.

_ _

in all models.

Reconditioned and Used Office and Portable
Typewriters of all makes bought, sold, rented,
exchanged, cleaned and repaired. SPECIAL
RENTAL RATES to students. Ask about our
easy Rental-Purchase Plan; it will save you
money.
Buy where you may compare all standard
makes in a complete range of prices.

WAT LKMAN
and Others
Broken assortments
1/3 to j/2 Regular Prices
Service Work a Specialty

STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOKS
CORRESPONDENCE STATIONERY

I I

STUDENT EVANGELICAL CHAPEL
Friday, 8:00 p.m. Get Acquainted Hour in the Fire-
side Room, Lane Hall.
Sunday

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
409 South Division
Sunday
10:30 a.m. Morning Worship Service.
Tuesday

1 7 1

11

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