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August 10, 1940 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-08-10

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1940

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10, 1940 PAGE THREE

Army Begins
Building New
Monster Tank
WASHINGTON, Aug. 9.--(P)--The
Army maintained strict secrecy to-
night regarding the details of, a new
monster tank which is to go into
production shortly at the Baldwin
Locomotive Works in Philadelphia.
Officials evidently felt that any
information regarding the design of
the "land battleship" might prove of
value to some foreign nations.
They were displeased by the fact
that news of the $5,6 9,725 contract
with Baldwin for production of an
undisclosed number of the tanks had
slipped out in a routine list of con-
tract clearings made public by the
National Defense Commission.
It was assumed the Army's new
heavy tanks would resemble the 70-
ton giants which have been credited
with playing an important part in
the German break-through of Bel-
gian and French defenses.
The United States Army is already
building light tanks of around 12 tons
each and medium tanks of nearly
20 tons, but it has hesitated in the
past to build huge land battle-wa-
gons of 50 tons or more.
20-Pound
Bond
GOOD QUALITY
WHILE IT LASTS
500 Sheets...60c
'The
CRAFT PRESS
305 Maynard Street

Black Out Ball
To Be Tonight
'Come As Asked' Apparel
To Feature Last Dance
Of Season At League
"Come as you were asked" cos-
tumes will be worn for the Black
Out Ball to be held from 9 p.m. to
12 p.m. today in the League Ball-
room.
The black out party has become a
favorite campus event for winter stu-
dents, and is to be tried for the last
dance on the Summer Session social
program.iBetty Hoag is in charge
of the affair, and Rosebud Scott
is assisting her with the details of
the dance.
The wide variety of possible cos-
tumes for the dance will stress in-
formality. A hostess group will be
there as usual to help- those attend-
ing alone to find partners. The group
consists of Betty Willging, Betty Dic-
kens, Mildred Lamb, Helen Gunther,
Miriam Westerman, Violet Villany,
Josephine Clancy, Marilyn Vogel and
Dorothy Vogel.
The dance, to be held from 9 p.m.
to 12 p.m., will include black outs
during the evening. Earl Stevens and
his orchestra is to furnish the music
for the evening, as he has done for
the entire summer social program.
The price for the dance is 35 cents
a person.
Budget Approved
For Conservation
LANSING, Aug. 9.--(P)-A prelim-
inary budget for the next biennium
of more than $7,500,000 was approved
by the State Conservation Depart-
ment today for all operating pur-
poses.
The proposed outlay would be $1,-
185,828 more in the next fiscal year
than in the present, and $440,201
more in 1942-43 than in this year.
The Commission voted to ask the
Legislature for $1,733,000 for general
fund operations for the first year of
the biennium and $1,115,557 for the
second year.

Coming Attraction!

i

Americans Aid
Canada In Air
Unofficial Reports Claim
Thousands Enlist
OTTAWA, Aug. 9.-(IP)-Several1
thousands Americans were unofficial-
ly reported today to have joined up
with the Canadian air force here and'
in England as pilots, observers, air
gunners, mechanics and instructors.
The national defense department,
said it could not provide any figures
because until recently every man en-
listing in Canadian forces had to say
he was a British subject and had to
take the oath of allegiance. Since
this stipulation was dropped there
was a spurt in enlistments for the
air force.
It was reported unofficially that
100 Americans were in the first Ai-
vision of ground troops to go over-
seas, and the air force is far more
popular with Americans than the
Army.
With same proportion in Canadian
active service force, there would be
around 1,000 Americans in the Army.

Governor Receives Sympathy,
Is Warned To Watch His Health

O.

CHARLOTTE, Mich., Aug. 9.-(P)
-Sympathy for Governor Luren D.
Dickinson, whose wife died at their
farm home near here yesterday, was
mixed with concern lest emotional
strain impair the health and strength
of the Governor, who is 81 years old.
Mrs. Dickinson will be buried here
tomorrow following funeral services
at 3:30 p.m. in the Charlotte Meth-
odist Church. Her body will lie in
state from 1 p.m. until the funeral.
Dr. H. Allen Moyer, State health
commissioner and Dickinson's per-
sonal. physician, said his old friend
has shown remarkable fortitude. He
suggested that it "might be well for
Governor Dickinson to keep occupied
by returning to his duties in the
capitol next week."
The commissioner said Dickinson
might experience an emotional let-
down following the funeral, and rec-
ommended work to occupy his mind.
He emphasized, however, that Dick-
inson must be careful not to over-
tax his strength.

home tonight. Hundreds of persons
have sent mesages of condolence to
the Governor or called upon him per-
sonally to express their sympathy.
Included in the group were neighbors
to whom Dickinson still is "Luren."

And Never The Twain
ShalltMeet - Oh, Heck!
SAN BERNARDINO, Calif., Aug.
9.-(AP)-Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Hanna,
decided to pay asurprise visit to their
daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Alvin Allen in Portland Ore.
Mr. and Mrs. Allen had the same
idea.
Their 1,100-mile journeys were in
vain.

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Typewriters

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302 South State Street
"Quality and Service"
Student Supplies -- Leather GaoI v

- Fountain Pens

Be Satisfied With A MICHIGAN DAILY Classified

Mrs. Dickinson's body lay in their

Pre-fall colors are being shown
in the late summer dresses. Two-
tone color-schemes in chambray,
handkerchief linen, or spun rayon
are practical and cool for wear at
college on the warmer days next
fall, too.

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'7ieddinrgs

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g
't
_ .

FRESHMAN LUGGAGE AND
LAUNDRY PROBLEM -

SOLVED!

c and .-
-ngagements
Edith Marjorie Edsill of Oakland
Ave., has chosen Sept. 7 as the date
of her wedding to Louis Edward Mc-
Murray, of Hollidays Cove, W. Va.,
it was revealed at an announcement
party given Wednesday evening in
the Grand Rapids Room of the
League.
McMurray is a son of Dr. and Mrs.
John McMurray, of Washington, Pa.
He received his B.S. from the College
of Engineering in 1939, and is a mem-
ber of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. The
bride-to-be also attended the Uni-
versity.
At a tea given at the Union Wed-
nesday, the approaching marriage of
Bette Eunice Smith and James T.
Duffy III, was made known by means
of a double ring wedding cake. The
date picked for the ceremony is Aug.
31. The engagement was announced
by the parents of the bride-to-be,
Mr. and Mrs. Delbert W. Smith, of
Baldwin Ave.
Mr. and Mrs. James T. Duffy, of
Louisville, Ky., are the parents of the
bridegroom. Duffy is a former Uni-
versity student and is a member of
Sigma Nu fraternity. Miss Smith
attended Stephens College at Colum-
bia, Mo., and was a junior in the
University last year.
American School Bombed
CHUNGKING, China, Aug. 10.-(P)
-A dormitory wing of the American
Methodist school was destroyed and
other buildings of the school were
shaken yesterday by Japanese aerial
bombs which destroyed more than
900 buildings in this Chinese pro-
visional capital

Take a tip from upper classmen. Forward your luggage to
college by trusty, convenient RAILWAY EXPREss. When you
phone we'll call at your home for your trunks, bags, boxes,
anything, and deliver them promptly and safely at your r
college, without extra charge in all cities and principal towns.
Low rates and you can take your tiain with peace of mind.
And at college you can solve your laundry problem easily
and economically. Arrange to "express" the laundry home
and back by our quick, dependable service. You can send
it collect or prepaid. Just phone
Ann Arbor R.R. Depot
420 S. Ashley St.. Phone 2-4496
Depot Office: Michigan Central R.R. Phone 5714,
Ann Arbor, Mich.
RAILW A XPRESS
N IAGENCY INC.
NATION-WIDE RAIL-Alt SERVICE

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CHURCH
DIRECTORY

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister.
Mr. Walter Kimble, Minister of Music.
10:30 A.M. The Church at Worship.
11:30 A.M. The Church at Study. All members
of the congregation are urged to participate
in this forty-minute period of Bible study.
The Kindergarten and Beginners Depart-
ments .meet during the Worship Service and
have directed-play during the study period.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 8498.
9:00'A.M. Service in German.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship.

4 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

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1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466.
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister.
Lillian Dilts, Assistant.
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
10:45 a. m. Morning Worship Service. "THE RE-
ALITY OF CHRIST" will be the subject of
the sermon by the Rev. David Porter, minis-
ter of the First Presbyterian Church, Ypsi-
lanti, Michigan.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State St. between Washington and Huron.
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares,
J. Edward Lantz.
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director of choir;
Mary Porter, organist.

.. S r tI r r^

Seen in Vogue and Harper's Ba

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