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August 03, 1940 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-08-03

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1940

THE MTCTTIc AN 11 ATTrY

s .aa sa a a 1 X11 i V R 11 L R 11f 1
oil
4

Four Receive
Dance Prizes
From League
Jitterbug Contest Is Won
By Corman And Stoffer;
Cliffords Get Awards
Jitterbugs, conservatives and just
plain naturalists swung out last night
at the dance contest before an en-
thusiastic crowd of 325 stomping
dancers.
Approximately 30 couples willingly
competed in the smooth dancing con-
test and from this mass, John Clif-
ford and sister Cathleen came out
in triumph. From an overly mdest
crowd, four couples took their cour-
age in their hands and jived in ex-
tremely close competition, with
judges Betty Hewitt, Elva Pascoe
and Bill Collins professionally scru-
tinizing every move. The judges went
into a huddle and declared the win-
ners to be Helen Corman and Eddie
Stoffer, with announcer Dick Power
breaking the news over the mike.
Elaine Pew and Dick Gainey then
stepped on the ballroom floor and
proceeded to show the way profes-
sionals jitterbug. Both dancers are
senior students at the Roy Hoyer
Studio of Dance. Another feature of
the evening was an exhibition waltz.
This dance presented by the Sum-
mer Session League Council in con-
junction with the Summer Session
Office was under the direction of
Jeanne Crump, '42, chairman of Fri-
day evening dances. Earl Stevens
and his orchestra playing regularly
weekends furnished special music for
the contest.
Selected Hostesses
Officiate Tonight
At Weekend Dance
Hostesses for the dance to be held
from 9 to 12 p.m. Saturday at the
League have been announced by
Louise Lage, who is in charge of the
group for this event.
The list includes Catherine Plum,
Marilyn Vogel, Dorothy Vogel, Jose-
phine Clancy, Betty Willging, Miriam
Westerman, Viola Griffin and Ann
Evarts.
Earl Stevens and his orchestra will
furnish the music for the dance. The
hostesses will be present to help those
attending alone to find partners.
This group is especially selected and
approved by the Summer League
Council. Price for the League week-
end dances is 35 cents a person.
Duke Of Windsor
Goes To Bermuda
WASHINGTON, Aug. 2.-(IP)-
Diplomatic circles heard today that
the Duke of Windsor, en route to
this hemisphere aboard the United
States Liner Excalibur, definitely
would not come to the United States
but would disembark at Bermuda.
This was learned shortly after the
Maritime Commission said it had
granted permission to the Excalibur
to stop at the British island on itsI
voyage from Lisbon, Portugal. The
Duke is en route to take over his
duties as governor of the Bahama
islands.

U.S. Parachute Troops Start Training

Men of the 29th Infantry, U.S. Army, started learning how to be
parachute troops at Hightstown, N. J. . Here a member of the training
platoon from Fort Benning, Ga., is being pulled aloft preparatory to a
descent guided by cables.
RAIDIO_'SPOTLIGHT
WJR WWJ WXYZ CKLW
750 KC - CBS 920 KC - NBC Red 1240 KC- NBC Blue 1030 KC - Mutual
Saturday Afternoon
12:00 Glee Club Soloist News Ace Tenor
12:15 Health Highways " Marguerite Werner ,,
12.:30 Recruiting Prog. Bradcast To Be Announced News Ace
12:45 " Your Treat Fan on the Street McFarland Orch.
1:00 Vera Brodsky Your Government Ray Kinney .Orch. "Might Be You"
1:15 " Dance Music "1To Be Announced
1:30 Follies " Lunch at Waldorf L. Noble Orch.
1:45 It" F.H.A. Speaker
2:00 U.S. Mar. Band Bobby Byrne Orch London Calling
2:15 " Tiger Talk"
2:30 News; Music Boston at Detroit Nat'l Music Camp "
2:45 Keyb'd, Console ""
3:00 Bull Session " Club Matinee News; Songs
3:15 " Melody; Turf
3:30 to be announced " Jamboree
3:45 Quartet"
4:00 Buffalo Presents Gus Steck Orch. "
4:15 t'> t
4:30 Saratoga Race Spotlight R'ythm by Ricardo Handicap Race
4:45 Br'ndywine Orch " " Tea Dance Tunes
5:00 News; Warner " Cecil Golly Orch. News; Rhythm
5:15 to be announced Albert's Orch. " The Turf Club
5:30 Yella Pessi Art of Living Day In Review Rumanian Hour
5:45 News Reel Merle Clark The Sandlotters "
Saturday Evening
6:00 Stevenson News Sport Review Benny Kyte Orch. Sons of the Saddle
6:15 Inside of Sports European News.of
6:30 Gay Nineties I Want A Job Record Review Sports
6:45 Michigan Hgwys Tropic Com'entary
7:00 to be announced Dance Music Town Talk News-val Clare
7:15 "1"oBourbonnais Orch. Jim Parsons
7:30 News--to Life S. L. A. Marshall The Marriage Club Hopkins Orcn.
7 :45 to Statler Orchestrato,
8:00 Your Hit Parade Nat'l Barn Dance Gabriel Heatter Evening Prelude
8:15 " Jenkins' Orch. o
8:30 " " Grant Park Conc't Choral Festival
8:45 Sat. Serenade " "t
9:00 " Camel Caravan European News Hope Tabernacle
9:15 Public Affairs " Munroe Orch. "
9:30 News of the War Dance Music Paul Laval Orch. News Ace
9:45 Melody Marvels " " Music Hall
10:00 Musical News Ace Canadian News
10:15 Hutton Orch. " Dance Music Britain Speaks
10:30 Jurgens Orch. " Baron Elliott Orch. Musical Mirror
10:45 " " News Interlude
11:00 Larry Payne"" Club Reporter
11:15 Ozzie Nelson " Glenn Miller Oroh. Thompsoz Orch.
11:30 L. Noble Orch. Eastwood Orch. Joe Sudy Orch. Herbie Kay Orch.
11:45 y ' ro r.ay
12:00 Bobby Day Orch Westwood Orch. Dancinig Party Ray Noble Orch.

By JUNE McKEE
BROADCASTING DAY is being ob-
served this third of August at
the New York World's Fair of 1940,
and Golden Gate Exposition at San
Francisco, with the principle of free-
dom of radio specially upheld.
"The most cherished of traditional
American rights," Mrs. Charles F.
McGoughran, regent representative
for the DAR, declared, "is free speech
and its present-day component--
freedom of radio. As a patriotic or-
ganization, the DAR gives its heart-
felt endorsement to Broadcasting
Day, arranged by the country's two
big Fairs in tribute to the radio in-
dustry's achievements and-what is
of paramount importance in these
times-dedicated to the preservation
of freedom of radio."
Lester F. Scott, national executive
for the Camp Fire Girls, echoed Mrs.
McGoughran's statements on behalf
of his own organization.
Two bronze plaques will be un-
veiled simultaneously at the San
Francisco and New York Fairs dur-
ing an hour-long broadcast cli-
maxing today's celebration. All
ma for networks and scores of in-
dependent stations will be linked
for the programs airing from 8 to
9 p.m. EST.
"Dedicated by the Broadcasters
of America to a Free Radio in the
Public Interest" is the inscription
on the plaque, while a quotation
from Walt Whitman supplies the
motif engraved "I say there can be
no safety for these states...with-
out free tongues, and ears willing
to hear the tongues."
In bas-relief on each bronze plaque
is a man at mike, surrounded by five
great Americans who fervently be-
lieved in free speech-Abraham Lin-
coln, George Washington, Thomas
Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and Ben-
jamin Franklin.
Over WJR at 10:30 a.m. today,
"The Fourth Fiddler" has his fling,
directed by Prof. Donald Hargis, an-
nounced by Peter Antonelli. What
happened when another fiddler came
to court and wanted to play for Old
King Cole with his Fiddlers Three
will be enacted in this weekly chil-
dren's program by Charles Zolla,
Charles Hill, Bob Reisneider, Walter
Weaver, Chester Webb, Don Bloedon,
Charles Miller, Vera Holleman, and
Theo Whitted. D.rJ. Caughey will
furnish sound effects.
"The Poetry Corner" then provides
the second portion of the program,
presided over by the students in Pro-
fessor Hargis' radio class.
LWeddrng s
Sand
Engagements
Mr. and Mrs. William Savage of
Prospect Street have announced the
engagement of their daughter, Marie
Lucy Savage to Ray Moree of Ellens-
burg, Mich.
Mr. Moree received his degree of
bachelor of science from State Col-
lege of Washington and is now work-
ing on his doctorate in the Univer-
sity.
Miss Savage is a graduate of Mich-
igan State Normal College in Ypsi-
lanti and holds a position in the of-
fice of the UniversitynHospital.
The couple have not set the date
for the wedding.
The engagement of Irene Roberts,
daughter of Mrs. Sanford"Roberts of
Louisville, Ky., to Donald Sturgis, son

of Mrs. Gladys Sturgis, of Washing-
ton Heights was announced at a
soiree at Mrs. Sturgis' home Thurs-
day. Miss Roberts is a member of the
University Hospital nursing staff.

(Continued from Page 2)
cliffe, Arkansas, to attend the Lin-
guistic Institute. He will sketch some
of his experiences in Mexico in con-
nection with his translation of the
Bible there.
Lutheran Student Association: The
last meeting during the Summer Ses-
sion of the Lutheran Student Associ-
ation will be held next Sunday eve-
ning. The group will meet at the Zion
Lutheran Parish Hall at 5:30 p.m.,
and will proceed from there by cars
to the home of Herman Haas for
supper and social hour. All Lutheran
students and friends are invited to
attend.
First Baptist Church: 10:30 a.m.
"What Is Thy Name" is the subject
of the sermon by the Reverend Wil-
liam Muehl, of Birmingham, Michi-
gan.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Serviwe Examination. Last date
for filing application, August 26,
1940.
UNITED STATES CIVIL SERVICE
Senior Illustrator (Air-Brush), sal-
ary $2,300 a year.
Illustrator (Air-Brush), salary $2,-.
000 a year.
Assistant Illustrator (Air-Brush),
salary $1,800 a year.
Junior Illustrator (Air-Brush), sal-
ary $1,620 a year.
Candidates for the Teacher's Cer-
tificate for August 1940, to be recom-
mended by the School of Education,
Ann Arbor
Here Is Today's News
In Summary
There's no telling what a woman
driver will do. One from Detroit yes-
terday hit a car near Ypsilanti, re-
fused to stop and led her accident
victim a merry chase for seven miles.
The long arm of the law finally
caught up with her, Mrs. Bernice
Williams, in Ypsilanti. She was given
fifteen days with no chance to pay
a fine.
* * *
Roland Wiederanders, a theology
student from Toledo, was named as-
sistant to Rev. E. C. Stellhorn, pastor
of the Zion Lutheran Church, yes-
terday. Wiederanders will stay here
for a year, then resume his studies.
Local manufacturers met yesterday
to discuss a program for training
workers for Ann Arbor industry. They
proposed to train young people so
that they may adjust themselves to
any local factory. They revealed
there are 135 jobs right now which
would be filled with local labor if it
was available. The group decided to
ask the aid of Michael Church, state
NYA supervisor now in Ann Arbor,
for surveying the need and value of
the proposed program.
* * *
John Bradfield, president of In-
ternational Industries, (better known
as makers of the Argus camera and
Kadette Radios) resigned yesterday
as head of the organization to devote
his time to important contract work
and new developments for the com-
pany.

are requested to call at the office of
the School of Education, 1439 U.E.S.1
on August 1, 2, 6, or 7 to take the
Teacher Oath which is a requirement
for the certificate.
Examination Schedule for Six-
Week Courses in Education:
Time of Regular Time of
Class Meetings Examinations
8 a.m. Fri., 4-6 p.m.
9 a.m. Sat., 7-9 a.m.
10 a.m. Sat., 1-3 p.m.
11 a.m. Sat., 9-11 a.m.
1 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
2 p.m. Fri., 2-4 p.m.
3 p.m. Sat., 3-5 p.m.
The final examination schedule
as published in the complete an-
nouncement is incorrect. Below is the
correct schedule.
Hour of
Recitation 8 9 10 11
Time of Thurs. Fri. Thurs. Fri.
Examination 8-10 8-10 2-4 2-4
Hour of All other
Recitation 1 2 3 hours
Time of Thurs. Thurs. Fri. Fri.
Examination 4-6 10-12 10-12 4-6

Speech Students: Students enrol- in "The Teaching of Speech." (Audi
led in Speech courses and all others torium of the W. K. Kellogg Insti-
interested are invited to attend the tute.)
Speech Conference to be held by the 12:15 p.m.-Speech Luncheon, six-
Department of Speech as follows: ty-five cents. (Ballroom of the Michi-
Monday, August 5. 9 a.m. to 12- gan League.)
Registration. (Office of Department 3 to 5 p.m.-Conference on "Prob-
of Speech, 3211 Angell Hall.) lems of Dramatic Production." (Ly-
2 to 3:30 p.m.-Conference on "Prob- dia Mendelssohn Theatre.)
lems in the Teaching of Speech." 8:30 p.m.-Performance of "Pa-
(4203 Angell Hall.) tience" (Gilbert and Sullivan) by the
3:30 to 5 p.m.--Conference on Michigan Repertory Players of the
"Problems in the Directing of For- Department of Speech. (Lydia Men-
ensics." (4003 Angell Hall.) delssohn Theatre.)
8 p.m.-Demonstration Debate on
the National High School Question. Graduate Speech Students: All
(Lecture Hall, Horace H. Rackham students who plan to complete thfe
School of Graduate Studies.) requirements for the Master's de-
Tuesday, August 6, 9 to 10 a.m.- gree in Speech in August should leave
Demonstration Class in "Studies in their names with Miss McIntyre at
Reading and Dramatics." (Auditor- 3211 Angell Hall.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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SEMI-ANNUAL CLEARANCE

Smart Summer
SAVINGS!

SUMMER DRESSES
LEFT-OVER SPRING DR

Here's your chance to buy dresses to finish the summer, for next
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The cottons originally priced at $5.95 to $10.95.
The crepes, sheers, and prints originally $7.95 to $29.95.
SHOP IN AIR-CONDITIONED COMFORT at
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Helpful Hints For,
ootln Authoritative sources said today
AY that it will not hurt any of us to be
age hit a bit frivolous this summer. What
i movie with war headlines we forget that
a yearly vacation period was meant
for fun and relaxation.
So pack up your suitcase and see
4EWS to it that you have fun, glamor, and
rest during your vacation time. If
you travel light you will want one
,EYES" of these gayly colored, zipper close,
EYS manicuring kits, which contain all
EALS" you need to keep nails meticulously
groomed night. and day.
e An authoritative source (Patricia
_WS Lindsay of St. Louis, Mo.) continues
by reminding travelers that to ra-
diate a perfumed glamor one should

Summer Travelers
begin with a bath and then follow
it by a friction rub of 'lovely fra-
grance in the form of a perfumed1
stick of colorless pomade.I

'round the corner on State

A FtCK-U1'

A
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7>
A'
4/>

to Pehyo p

s^

1

SHOWS TODAY at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
MATS. 28c - EVES. 39C
NOW PLAYING

IN-BETWEENS
for this transitional period be-
tween hot July days and the
sweater-skirt weather of Septem-
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frocks for class and after-school
travels. Low priced, high-styled
... just what you've been look-
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ZWERDLING'S 36th
and GRERTEST
August Sale
. . . presents . . .
BRILLIANT FASHIONS... INDIVIDUALITY . .
RARE BEAUTY AND SENSATIONAL VALUES!
IN BUYING FURS . . .
The Integrity of the Maker is Most Important! Zwerdling's
Furs better than ever, have earned an enviable reputation -
due to their untiring efforts in providing The Greatest Values
and Service during the 36 years in this city. From the
humble Muskrat to the Royal Mink you" may choose yours
confidently, for each is backed by Zwerdling's absolute guar-
antee.
50 YEARS FUR EXPERIENCE and LOW OVERHEAD
assures you UNEXCELLED VALUES and SERVICE.
A deposit reserves your selection.
No interest or carrying charge.

'A
/4

c s
i yi

$1.98

I

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