100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 26, 1939 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1939-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

) 'Mystery'
ts Presented
o University

Unique International Center Plans
Teas, Open House This Summer

Latlons
53.33
its Are

Reach
Total;
Largest

"mystery" donations of $500,-
ece were announced by the
ity this month.
donors were anonymous with
ney to be used for "an unan-
I purpose." At the same time
revealed that donations dur-
school year of 1938-39 total-
51,553.33. The largest amount
n the form of $2,541,330 in

{

grants to
ion with
% $236.500.

be used for plant ex-
the second largest
from the W. K. Kel-
at Battle Creek. The
used toward an addi-

In enumerating gifts, the Univer-
y said that it received $2,809,657.
r land, buildings and equipment;
,122,486 for miscellaneous specific
irposes; $117,895 for fellowships,
holarships and prizes; $71,868 for
,search; $14,138 for books; $8,621
r art objects and historical ormu
uum material, and $6,886 for stu-
nt aid.
Large gifts listed included $48,000
om the United States Public Health
rvice for training of public health
rsonnel; $19,473 from the estate of
e late Prof. Orma F. Butler for a
holarship fund; $19,029 from the
tate of the late Eugene G. Fassett,
Chicago, for scholarships and
5,000 from the McGregor Fund of
etroit for the Institute of Public
id Social Administration.
)r. Eddy Receives
Pharmacy Award
WASHINGTON, June 25. (Special
The Daily).-The American Phar-
aceutical Manufacturer's Associa-
n today revealed Dr. Nathan B.
Idy is one of two U.S. Public Health
rvice experts who will receive its
anual award for outstanding chemi-
I research. Dr. Eddy did his re-
arch at the University of Michigan.
Dr. Lyndon F. Small won the award
intly with Dr. Eddy. The two scien-
ts' research was on morphine sub-
itutes which reduce the danger of

Completing its first year on cam-
pus, the International Center willy
remain open during the Summer
Session under the supervision of
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, director, who
will be in residence through July.
Assistants will be in charge after
Professor Nelson leaves.
Aside from a program of language
teas and an open. house, the Center
will have no formal activities during
the summer because of the already
crowded program of the Summer
Session. The Center will be open
daily from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. except
Saturdays and Sundays, when it will
be closed from Saturday noon until
7 p.m. Sunday.{
The series of language teas will be,
sponsored for the benefit of students
enrolled in the language institutes
connected with the Summer Session
and their facilities. The teas will
offer those engaged in the concen-;
trated courses in the various lan;
Fries Will Direct
Linguistics Forum
(Continued from Page 1)
the summer in Ann Arbor to aid in
the study of his speech.
Other groups will work in similar
fashion with a Lithuanian speaker
under the direction of Dr. George
Trager of Yale University, and with
a Telugu speaker from, India under
the direction of Dr. Murray Emen-
eau, also of Yale.
The second emphasis of the Insti-
tute is upon Egyptian studies, with
course work being offered both by
Prof. William Worrell of the Univer-'
sity and by Dr. William F. Edgerton,
professor of, Egyptology at. the U ni-
versity of Chicago.
A third emphasis is upon a basic
'course, the meetings of which are
open to all members of the Institute,
which will consist of related lectures
upon pertinent language topics de-
livered by members of the Institute
faculty. This course will meet Tues-
flay and Thursday evenings.
Enrollment in the Institute, reports
'Dr. Fries, already compares favor-
ably with the record attained last
year. Most of the students drawn,
to the Institute are graduates, °'and
many are university teachers doing
post-doctorate work in special fields'
of linguistic research or broadening
'their acquaintance with languages
outside their own teaching fields.'

guages an opportunity to meet the
students at the Center coming -from
the countries represented and to
provide practice in conversation.
Members of the faculty or of the
community who speak any of the
languages listed are also invited to
attend.
For students taking Japanese there
will be a tea from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
each Monday in the recreation room
of the Center, beginning Monday,
'July 3. Three teas have been sched-
uled for students and faculty of the
Institute of Latin-American Studies,
'for Tuesdays, July 11 and 18 and
'Aug. 1. At these teas both Spanish
and Portuguese will be spoken. Plans
are also being made for a weekly Chi-
nese tea and for at least one Near
Eastern Cultural Interest tea.
Open house will be held at the
Center from 8 p.m. to 12 p.m. Wed-
anesday, July 5, to which all interest-
ed are invited.
Invitation is extended by Profes-
sor. Nlson to all foreign students in
the Summer Session and all mem-
bers ofthe various linguistic insti-
tutes to use the Center whenever
they wish. The International Center
is located in the Union group of
buildings with its entrance on Madi-
son Just west of State Street.
Tigers Win; Yanks
Split Doubleheader
Bud Thomas, sold down the river
by Washington's Senators, came back
yesterday to triumph over. his old
teammates and give Detroit a 6 to 5
victory while the Yankees were split-
ting a double header with St. Louis.
In the American League's other
contests Cleveland and Conny Mack's
Athletics halved another double bill.
In the Lloyd Lewis (National) league
New York defeated Cincinnati, 3 to
2; the Dodgers dodged past Pitts-
burgh, 6 to 5; Boston took two games
from St. Louis and the Cubs toasted
the Phillies to a nice bruin, 4 to 3.
Elsewhere on the sports front, the
Yankee officials announced July 4
will be Columbia Lou Gehrig's day
with the proceeds going to the inca-
pacitated athlete. On Broadway, bet-
ting commissioner Jack Doyle an-
nounced that odds. against Tony
(The beer barrel that walks like a
man) Galento had dropped with the
ring wise predicting he may last six
rounds.

Athletics Now Taught
By Extension Service
Instruction in swimming, golf,
tennis and dancing, in addition to
laboratory work in ceramics, wood
sculpture, drawing and painting, is
being offered by the University Ex-
tension Service this summer.
The courses are open to students
not enrolled in the summer school,
and separate tuition fees will be
collected in each course.
Swimming, golf and tennis classes
will be held twice a week beginning
today for eight weeks in the Intra-
mural building. Dancing classes for
children will be held twice a week
for six weeks in Barbour Gymna-
sium.
Classes in ceramics and wood
sculpture will be in the Architecture
Building, and those in free-hand
drawing and painting will meet in a
'studio on Forest Avenue.

(Continued from Page 1)
the geography summer camp in Wil-
derness State Park near Mackinaw
City on the shores of the Straits of
Mackinac. f
The camp will make use of a CCC
camp which has been loaned the
University for the summer, and which
is located in one of the few remain-
ing areas of natural wilderness in
the state.
The work of the camp consists of
learning and using the various tech-
niques of field mapping with some
work in local courthouses on owner-
ship and tax records. .Students will
acquire practice in soil and cover
mapping, ownership of tax records,
conservation methods and various
techniques used in land utilization
and investigation work.

University Provides German Club Organizes
4 Summer Camps At 7:30 P.M. Tomorrow

Biological Station
Death Of Prof.

ISPECIALS'

p

Students of German and all others
interested in the German language
are urged to attend the organiza-
tion meeting of the Summer German
Club at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
Deutsches Haus, 1315 Hill St.
Officers will be elected and plans
for the summer will be discussed. The
summer program will consist of an
excursion, picnic, visiting lecturer,
musical evening and final banquet,
A Want Ad Will Sell It!

"

at your REXALL Drug Store

).V
aNCTE I 4 j...
NEW VASSAR
Swim Trunks.
The better you swim, the
more you'll appreciate
Vassars. They're like noth-
ing you've ever worn before,
because they're likewearing
nothing at all! No binding,
chafing, crawling orreadjust-
ing anywhere, no matter how
hard you swim, dive or exer-
cise. Just day-long comfort
and all-over support without
a bulky belt or athletic sup-
porter! Yout actually don't
need either one of them!
High-luster colors in rayon
and"Lastex"with
soft lisle next to 95
your skin.
Also mercerized yarn and $395
Lastex witfine wool inside

Guaranteed Alarm Clocks......89c
Laundry Cases .. . . . ... . .. ..$1.39
Fountain Pens .......... 50c - $1.00
Electric Fans...............$1.39
25c Listerine Tooth Paste.... . .19c
50c Dr. Lyons Tooth Powder . . . 39c
50c ipano Tooth Paste..... . .39c
50c Forhans Tooth Paste ........ 39c
Arrid Deodorant .. .. ..39c and 59c
c.Mum...-.............49c
75c Listerine .........59c
75c Fitch's Shampoo............49c
35c Dr. Wests Tooth Brushes. 2 for 49c
50c Tek Tooth Brushes.........39c

UNIVERSITY BIOLOGICAL S
TION, Chetoygan, June 25, (S
cial to The Daily)-Members of
University Biological Station tc
mourned the death of their for
colleague, Prof. George E. Nich
who died Tuesday night in New
ven, Conn., after an, illness of
eral months.
Professor Nichols had been on
teaching staff of the Biological E
tion since 1920, where he tai
courses dealing with algae, mc
and liverworts. He received his d
tor's degree from Yale in 1909.

d

Pennsylvanian
Tennis Balls 3 for 1.09I
Bath Towels
25c - 35c - 50c
Wash Cloths
1Oc 3 for 25c

Stationery
75 Sheets 75 Envelopes
19c
Lucky Strikes, Camels
Chesterfields, Old Gold
Spuds
2 for 25c 1.19 carton

FOUNTAIN SPECIALS
Toasted Sandwch & Malted Milk -
SWIFT'S DRUG STOI
340 S. State St.

STATE STREET
at LIBERTY

Phone 3534

Delivery Service

N

what do you get when you phone

4

Ann-Arbor's Finest Dry Cleaning Service

from

GREENE'S

opposite

Michigan Theatre

Free

Building

Pick-up and Delivery

Charge Accounts

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan