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July 01, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1939-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICH.IGA-N D4ILY AGE'

Magic Eye Camera Tells Story Of Galento's Downfall

For a simple but effective spectator sports ensemble, try a striped jersey
, horizontal if you're slender, vertical if you're not. Combine this with a
9 fullish skirt of white in jersey, linen, or crepe. Simple, but casual
and smart.

Current Plays
Will Benefi lyt
Novel Course
Creation of costumes for actual
play productions is one of the fea-
tures of Costuming 150. a course
which Miss Lucy Barton is introduc-
ing this summer. Both history of
costumes and their practical con-,
struction are included. Students,
either graduate or undergraduate,
will be taught to sew, dye, black
boots, paint, make millinery or to ac-
complish anything that might be de-
manded by the exigencies of the pro-
ductions. Some experience in cos-
tuming is advisable before electing
this course. .
The aim of it is not to turn out
professional costumers, but to ac-
quaint the students with all phases
of theatre work, so that the student
who becomes a director, for example,
thoroughly understands the other
problems of play production.
Miss Barton teachers her students,
the history of costume from differ-
ent approaches, such as socially and
chronologically, so that they will
know the predominating colors, the
lines and the ornamentation used,
in the period. Then she acquaints
them with stage fabrics, since ma-
terials seen behind the footlights
presents an entirely different prob-
lem from material seen in actual
light. She emphasizes the necessity
of good cutting and sewing of cos-
tumes.
Contrary to popular opinion, it is
easier to teach men to sew on ma-
chines than women, because the for-
mer are more accurate and under-,
stand the working of the machines
they are using. Miss Barton also
finds that they are more efficient in
measuring and cutting and that they
sew straighter seams than women.
Try A DAILY Classified

High School
Discussed At

Journalism
Conference

(Continued from Page 1)

State Teachers
Attend Institute

in the community and the responsi-
bility of the supervisors for what ap-
pears in the paper. Marquis E. Shat-
tuck, Director of Language Educa-
tion in Detroit, spoke on the "Super-
visor's Viewpoint," saying that when
interviewing freshmen from Detroit
schools in the University he found
that those who had worked on school
papers were better in teh field of
English than others. He recommend-
ed the reading of newspaprs as part
of the instruction in all secondary
school English classes.
Miss Eva Marie Van Houten of
Redford High School, Detroit, pre-
sented facts and figures on high
school journalism resulting from a
questionnaire sent out under the
sponsorship of the Michigan Council
,of Journalism Advisers.
Today's program will open at 9:30
a.m. with an address by S.L.A. Mar-
shall of the Detroit News on "Pho-
tography" and one by Stanley K. Nor-
ton, of Wauwatosa High School,
Wauwatosa, Wis., on "Photography
-School Viewpoint."
Talks will be given later by Miss
Ruth Browne of the High School of
Commerce, Detroit, on "Advertising
in High School Publications;" E. R.
Kissack of Flint on "Circulation;"
Miss Myrtle Heseltine of Union High
School, Grand Rapids, on "Staff
Organization and Management;" and
Prof. Wesley Maurer of the journal-
ism department on "Teaching News-
paper Techniques."
The Institute will eb closed with a
luncheon at 1 p.m. at the League
with Prof. Edgar Dale of Ohio State
University speaking on "Teaching
Intelligent Reading of the News-
paper."

The magic eye camera recorded this story of the fatal fourth round of the Galento-Louis heavyweight chai-n
pionship fight in Yankee Stadium, New York. Upper left, Louis lands a right to the head; upper right, Louis
follows with a right to the body; lower left, Galento tot ters, his knees Duckling; lower right, he grasps the knees
of Arthur Donovan for support. At this point Donovan awarded Louis a technical knockout.

SPORTS ENTRY BLANK
Intramural Sports Department
All men students are eligible for competition in the following
sports. Check on the list below the sports in which you wish to
participate.
No Entry Fee Is Required
The Intramural Sports Department will make drawings and sched-
ules, furnish equipment needed for team sports, and provide officials
for the contests where necessary. Notification of opponent and time
of play will be mailed to each participant.

7&eddings 7
Cngagements

Mrs.
mouth

Beatrice M. Schultz of
recently announced the

I

Ply-
en-

MICHIGAN

A

1w

Softball
Swimming
Golf
(Average score).
Tennis Singles
Tennis Doubles
(

( )
( )
( )

Handball Doubles
HorseshoeSingles
Horseshoe Doubles

( )

()
(

gagement of her daughter, Kather-
ine Beatrice, '39, to John Hendricks
Jordan, Grad, son of Mr. and Mrs.
H. Lloyd Jordan of New Ulm, Minn.
Miss Schultz was a resident of
Mosher Hall, prominent in speech
activities on campus and a member
of The Daily. Mr. Jordan graduated
from Hamline University, at New
Ulm, Minn., and is now a graduate
student in the University.

)
)

Squash
( ) Table Tennis
Badminton

( )
( )
( )
( )
entries.

- e 5g w -
offGi N YVI
UNA ..'."0B .. p ;
Df, E , AVI
"Only Ang els H ave Wings"

i

Handball Singles ( ) Cddeball
Please indicate partner's name in space below doubles

Name ................... Address.................. Phone......
Mail or bring this blank to R. W. Webster, Supervisor of Intramural
Sports, Intramural Sports Bldg., Ferry Field. All entries close at 5 p.m.,
Thursday, July 6.

I

Is Duncan Hines Right?
Find Out at
The HAUNTED
TAVERN
417 E. Huron St. Free Parking

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10111 an ""
Mats. - 25c
Eves. - 35c

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1

THE

CHURCH
DIRECTORY

FACULTY

- STUDENT

{- 0 -->

II

SUMMER

II

DIRECTORY

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FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST i FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
409 South Division Corner of 512 E. Huron
John Mason Wells, D.D., Stat
Sunday 10:30 Dr. Howard Chapman, Un
Sunday School 11:45
Free Public Reading Room 206 East Liberty 9:30 A.M. Church school.
11:30 to 5 Daily except Sunday. Until 10:45 A.M. Morning Worship
n nn at~-. Reverend Paul R. Irwinc

ed Supply.
iversity Pastor.
o f Flint will

speak. The subject will be, "The First
Persor\ Singular." Mr. Irwin is a graduate
student during the Summer Session.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466
William P. Lemon, D.D. Minister.
Hardin Van Deursen, Choir Director.
William Barnard, Organist.
Palmer Christian, Organist and Director
on leave.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
"A TEXT FOR THIS AGE."
Sermon by Dr. Robert Worth Frank, Pres-
byterian Theological Seminar, Chicago,
Illinois. Special music by the student choir.
10:45 A.M. Nursery for those desiring to leave
their small during the Morning Worship
Service.
10:45 A.M. JUNIOR CHURCH SERVICE.
Special summer program for all children
above the third grade in the Russel-Piggot
parlors.
5:30 P.M. SUMMER SCHOOL VESPER
SERVICE. A cost supper will be served at
the Council Circle at the rear of the

3C

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On Sale Wednesday morning at--
Wahr's, Follett's, Ulrich's,, Union,
Wolverine, Student Publications

11

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Building and

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4

II I

ON THE CAMPUS

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