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August 11, 1939 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1939-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DIAIlY

FRMWAY, A

i ii ;/ .4 i i to ii i L i l a+ p i a ar s

'rt Roth Campers Travel
ough Ottawa National Forest

P

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F

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n Points Of Interest
ited; Short Lectures
livered By Rangers
ty-five mile "show-me" trip
the Ottawa National Forest
ted the usual weekly lecture
?st Service officials at Camp
Roth.
ieather man was correct when
.icted rain, but it only lasted
f the morning. Eleven points
est were visted and at each
short talk was given by one.
hree Forest Service men who
'onducting the trip. These
upervisor R. B. McKennon of
awa National Forest, Ranger,
elick of the Watersmeet Ran-
trict, and Ranger T. E. Rob-
the Kenton Ranger District.
week saw the end of the course
Prevention and Control, given
f. Leigh J. Young. The "fire
vas played by the entire camp
mplete fire organization was
using students for all the po-.
Four look-outs manned the
look-out towers and report-
"fires" to the dispatchers of-
iere directions were immedi-
ven and a fire crew-was im-

mediately dispatched to put out the
"'fire."~
Instruction in the use of fire tools
was given when the crews reached
the "fire." Actual field conditions
were simulated as closely as possible
though the "fires" were but small
campfires on which ferns had been
piled to produce a .large volume of
smoke with very little fire.
Dr. Harvey Hessler, the camp doc-
tor, has been relieved by Dr. Paul
Lindquist, a new member of the Uni-
versity Health Service staff. Dr.
Hessler returns to the comparatively
peaceful life of a city doctor.
Midwesterners
To Be Honored
In Final Dance

Earl
Is
At

Stevens' Orchestra
To Play Favorites
Union Affair Today

American

momic- Link
obedToday
'Continued from Page 1)
P to be considered today:
merica's Reaction to Foreign'
nt," will be led by Prof. J.
echam of the University of

on's will be pre-
y F. Grady, vice-
ariff Commission,
Assistant Secre-
acing Francis B.
mmissioner of the

The last Friday night dance in the
series of dances given for the Sum-
mer Session students will be held
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. tonight at the
Union.
The dance tonight is to be in hon-
or of all the students on the campus
this summer who are from midwes-
tern states. Included in the list of
states to be honored are: Michigan,
Iowa, Illinois, Ohio, Nebraska, Indi-
ana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North
and South Dakota,,'and Kansas.
Music for the affair will be provid-
ed by Earl Stevens and his orchestra.
Songs from the various states and
also songs from colleges and univer-
sities in these states will be played.
People desiring to hear special re-
quests are asked to call Mr. Stevens.
Because Michigan is to be one of the
honored states many of the old Mich-
igan favorites will be heard.
Betty Kepler, social chairman for
the League this summer and in
charge of the affair, has announced
that although midwesterners are to
be the special guests everyone else
is welcome. The dance is open to
both couples and stags. ,Single ' tick-
ets are 35 cents and couples tickets
are 70 cents.
In The Majors
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Y r .

With four years as settlers in government-sponsored Mantanuska, Alaska, already gone by, colonists George Venne and his son plow what was
almost unbroken forest in 1935. That was the first year the Vennes, from Manistee, Mich., and other families from drought areas, migrated to Alaska
to begin life anew on virgin soil.

(

Beginning at 9:30.a.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre, tomorrow's.
roundtables will be devoted to the
general topic: "Measures for Facili-
tating Trade between the Americas."
John Abbink, president of Business
Publisher's International Corpora-
tion, will open preliminary discus-
sion on the first sub-topic under this
general heading: "Bases for an In-
creased Trade between the Americas."
The second sub-topic: "Industrial-
ization in Latin America and its ef-
fect Upon Trade Relations, will be
introduced by George Wythe, Liaison
Officer for the United States De-
partment of Commerce.
An informal luncheon in the
Union will close tomorrow morning's
session.
The conference will convene for its
closing session at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow
in the Rackham Amphitheatre to
deal with the subject of "Latin
America, and the Reciprocal Trade
Program." Henry L. Diemel, Jr., As-
sistant Chief of the Division of Trade
Agreements in the Department of
State, will conduct the preliminary
discussion.
Members of the Latin American
Instittue, here for the Summer Ses-
sion, will also take an informal part
in the discussions.
"Expressions of different points of
view by members of the Conference
and questions from members of the
Institute and others who will com-
prise the audience should provoke an
active and frank discussion of the
numerous issues involved in our ec-
onomic relations with Latin Ameri-
can countries," Professor Phelps de-
blared.
Previous symposiums and confer-
ences sponsored here this summer by
the Institute dealt with Art and
Architecture in Latin America, Prob-
lems in the Study of Latin American
Literature, Bibliography and Re-
search Materials in the field of Latin
American Studies, and Land Tenure
and Agricultural Systems.
The current Conference on Econ-
omic Relations with Latin America
is the last to be sponsored by the
Instittue here this summer.
CLASSIFTED
DIRECTORY
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING-Miss L. M. Heywood, 414
Maynard St. Phone 5689. 32
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public, excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 3
EXPERIENCED typing, stenographic
service. Phone 7181 or evening 9609.
2
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 24
EXPERIENCED TYPING and mime-
ographing. Thomas Curtis, 537 S.
Division. Phone 2-3646. 25

I

New York ............
Boston .............
Chicago ..............
Cleveland...........
Detroit .............
Washington ..........
Philadelphia.........
St. Louis.... .

W
70
64
56
53
54
47
36
29

L
32
37
48
47
49,
58
67
71

Pat.
.686
.634
.538
.530
.524
.448
.350
.290

Thursday's Results
Detroit 4, Chicago 3.
Washington 7, New York 5.
Boston 7, Philadelphia 5.
Only games scheduled.
Friday's Games
'St. Louis at Detroit.
New York at Philadelphia.
Washington at Boston (2).
Only games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Tonight the trio in "Iolanthe" will sing "Faint heart never won fair
lady." Prince Stanislaus de Bielsky upset that saying when he wed the
Marquise d'Orlotte de Selve 'in London, with a doctor and a nurse (left)
in attendance. The prince has heart trouble. After the ceremony he
returned to the hospital and his wife (right) went to a hotel. They
plan to honeymoon later.

Though Igazis urge good sense in women's dress, caution against
"glamorous secretaries," and scold Hollywood fashiions, these fraliens
did all right in Berlin.

Cincinnati ............
St. Louis... .........
Chicago...........
Pittsburgh. . . . .
New York....... . .
Brooklyn...... . ..
Boston.............
Philadelphia.......

W L
65 36
56 42
55 49
49 47
51 48
50 50
43 57
28 67

Pct.
.644
.571
.529
.510
.515
.500
.430
.295

Death dame to one of two girls
who left their Miami homes in
quest of movie fame in discovery
early yesterday of the body of Ruth
Frances Dunn (lower), 17-year-
old high school girl. Her com-
panion, Jaen Bolton (top), 19-
year-old singer, was released by
their captor, who had slain Ruth,
and who confessed his crime to the
police.

Thursday's Results
Chicago 6, Cincinnati 4.
New York 6, Boston 3.
Brooklyn 3-3, Philadelphia 0-8.
Only games scheduled.
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago.
Philadelphia at New York.
Cincinnati at St. Louis.
Only games scheduled.
PROBABLE PITCHERS
American League
New York at Philadelphia: Gomez
(8-5) vs. Pippen (2-8).
St. Louis at Detroit: Kramer (7-12)
or Kennedy (6-14) vs. Hutchinson
(2-).
(Only games scheduled).
National League
Pittsburghaat Chicago, Butcher (2-
14) vs. Lee (13-10).
Philadelphia at New York: Higbe
(6-8) vs. Schumacher (7-7).
(Only games scheduled).
Big Six Leaders
BATTING
(Three leaders in each league)

In the harbor at Saint Nazaiie, France, rests "Transatlantic," the American Export Airlines' flying boat engaged now in making survey flights
across the Atlantic, with a view to establishing a service from U.S. to 30 Mediterranean ports. The airline will possibly fly mail in the fall and
passengers in a year or two.

Player,. Club G
Di Maggio, Yank 70
Foxx, Red Sox . 94
Johnson, Athlet. 98
Mize, Cardinals 97
Arnovich, Phillie 95
McCormick, Res 101
Bonura, Giants . 97

AB. R
263 59
353 100
280 85
361 71
359 52
408 74
364 66

H
102
130
133
125
124
138
123

Pet.
.388
.368
.350
.346
.345
.338
.338

HOME RUNS

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