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July 01, 1938 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1938-07-01

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THIS MICHIG'A DAILY

PAGE THREE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TRRR~

E.0H. Wilson
Is To Conduct
Services Here
Chicago Minister To Give
First Unitarian Church
Sermon -OnJuly Third
The Rev. Edwin H. Wilson, minister
of the Third Unitarian Church of
Chicago, will conduct the summer
services at the Unitarian Church, his
first being July 3 on "A Declaration
of Religious Independence", it was
announced yesterday.-
The Reverend Wilson was presi-
dent last year of the Unitarian Fel-
lowship for Social Justge, and is se-
cretary-treasurer of aie Humanist
Press Association. He has been active
in the campaign in Chicago to cor-
rect the evils of the school system. He
is a graduate of Boston University
and Meadville Theological School
and received an M.A. degree from the
University of Chicago. Before going
to Chicago, he was minister of the
church at Dayton, O. During the
World War he served in the U. S. Air
Corps.
A reception is planned at the
church on the evening of July 3
which will be preceded by a discus-
sion on the topic "When Does Pa-
triotism Become Nationalism?"
Clark Boyd will be chairman of
the committee on summer arrange-
ments, it was further announced,
and Miss Charlotte Palmer will be
in charge of the social committee of
the Unitarian Church.
Foresters Study
Fungi In Alaska

Murphy Calls Job Insurance Depression Weapon
As Unemployment Commission 0pens 108 Stations

IN"THIS CORNER
By MEL FINEBERG

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Rah, Rah, Rah ...
In spite of the derision with which
big league ball players treat young
college men just fresh out with their
diplomas and trying to crash the
majors, it seems that it's this oft de-
rided "college try" that wins pen-
nants.
No better example could be found
than this current season. Take
the Cincinnati Reds. The Reds
were at the bottom last year. They
had no place to go but up and some
people even doubted that. But
some young kid, a kid with an aris-
tocratic name and an even more
aristocratic brand of hurling, came
along to hurl two no-hitters and
pull the spotlight of the sporting
world onto the Reds. The kid's
name was, of course, John Vander
Meer.
Vander Meer had held the spot-
light of the baseball world once be-
fore when he was pitching for Dur-
ham in the Piedmont League. He
struck out 295 men in one year and
was hailed as the most promising
minor leaguer. He went up to the
Big Leagues with publicity galore and
he came down shortly to Syracuse in
the International League.
Vander Meer was no great guns in
the International League. But he
had the stuff and Cincy recalled him.
At the beginning of the season Bill
Terry said that if he had Vander
Meer he would walk home with the
pennant.
Johnny had not been up long
enough the first time to get the
glamour of it out of his system. He
is bearing down all the time and
it may pay off in a pennant.
Another freshman on the team,
Buck McCormick,;: has helped in in-
jecting the hypo. Batting in the
middle 300's, Buck has aided the
team no end. And he's up there try-
ing all the time.
It's Different Now . .
The American League is no dif-
ferent. The Cleveland Indians are
almost the same as.the flops of for-
mer years. That is,, except for rookie
Ken Keltner, sensational third base-
man, and another first year man,
Manager Oscar Vitt. The two new
men have rejuvenated the Cleveland
team and shoved them into the ri-
der's seat in the pennant race.
It's been the same for a long,
long time. Blondy Ryan did it for
the Giants with his famous tele-
gram "they can't beat us." Ryan
wasn't even a mediocre shortstop
but his indomitable spirit carried
the Giants along to the World
Series.
Jot DiMaggio's much heralded

coming did it for the Yankees two
years running. Di Mag was the spark
plug that pulled runner-up Yanks
into the win spot. Last year, the
coming of Jimmy Ripple and Moun-
tain Music Melton continued the
reign of Bill Terry's Giants.
Back in '34, Mickey Cochrane,
thrilled over his first managerial
post, pulled the Tigers to their first
pennant in almost thirty years.
And so it goes. Great teams, like
great countries and great cultures,
break down from stagnation.
That's why it's so difficult to win
the third consecutive pennant. The
team becomes lethargic, sure of
its own strength but not realiz-
ing that it takes more than mere
mechanical ability to win a pen-
nant. That same thing may be hap-
pening to the Yanks this year.
Young Flash Gordon has not
proved enough and a great ma-
chine is slowly crumbling. It hap-
pended to the Tigers in '36 and it's
an old story.
Dying teams need blood trans-
fusions as much as do dying people.
And in baseball, a team that has the
stuff on paper but does not produce
is a dying team. The young rookies,
the first year men, the kids who are
thrilled and enthused by the glory of
playing in the big leagues, are the
ones who instill the dash and fire in-
to a baseball machine. And "dying
for dear old Siwash" is often the dif-
ference between "all" and "almost."
Premature Funeral Held
For July Fourth Victims
PACKANACK LAKE, N. J., June
30-(P)-Although premature and
anticipatory, this community con-
ducted a "memorial service" today
for "the'Americans who will be killed
in action during the next four days
celebrating their independence."
Harry Daniels, president of the
Packanack Lake Dramatic Club
placed. a wreath on a store marker
inscribed "In Memoriam, Victims
of July Fourth, 1938."
The service also included a prayer
for highway and fireworks casualties
"expected throughout the nation."
Civic Band Plays Tonight
The Ann Arbor Civic Band, under
the direction of William R. Cham-
pion, will give its summer concert to-
night at 8:30 at West Park.
O.D.MORR IL L
314 S. State St.
Typewriters, Stationery,
Student and Office Supplies
Since 1908 Phone 6615

I

Seeking new information about the
growth and characteristics of forest
diseases, a party of three University
foresters, headed by Prof. Dow V.
Baxter of the forestry school left for
an extended trip through Alaskan
timberlands. The group will concen-
trate its study in the * vicinity of
Kodiak Island, where species of trees
similar to those growing in Michigan
forests are found.
The control of certain tree-des-
troying fungi, according to Professor
Baxter depends upon a knowledge of
the age of trees when attacked, and
such knowledge can best be obtained
in virgin forests, free from man-made
disturbances. This is Professor Bax-
ter's' sixth trip to Alaska. He is 'ac-
companied by Robert Dimler, '38
F&Q and George Dick, '39 F&C.
DAILY OFFICAL I
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Public Health Nurse, $2,000 a year.
Graduate Nurse (General Staff
Duty), $1,800 a year.
Nurse Technician (Bacteriology
and Roentgenology Combined),,$1,800
a year; In the Indian Field Service
(including Alaska), Department of
the Interior.
Assistant Gardener (Greenhouse),
$1,260 a year; Bureau of Plant In-
dustry, Department of Agriculture.
Michigan
Masonry Classes (applications to
be in by July 2).
Carpentry Classes (applications to
be in by July 2).
Tabulating Clerk Classes, $80-$125
per month.
Law Stenographer Clerk, $100 per
month.
For further information, please call
at the office, 201 Mason Hall. Office
hours: 9712 and 2-4.
Bureau of Appointment and
Occupational Information
Summer Session French Club: The
first meeting of the Summer Session
French Club will take place Thurs-
day, June 30, at 8 p.m. at "Le Foyer
Francais" 1414 Washtenaw.
The Summer Session French Club
is open for membership to graduate
and undergraduate students of the
French Department; to any student
on the campus; to Faculty members
and Faculty women.
The only requirement asked of the
applicants for membership is that
they speak reasonably well the
French Language..
All those interested must see Mr.
Charles E. Koella, room 200, Ro-
mance Language Building, Tuesday,
Wednesday or Thursday from 10 to
11 and 2 to 3, to receive their mem-
(Continued on Page 4)

The Michigan Unemployment
Compensation Commission today
opened 108 stations in the State to
schedule filing of Job insurance
claims by 300,000 totally unemploy-
ed. Benefits will be paid beginning
Aug. 1st.
The job insurance payment pro-
gram, in which registration of claims
is the initial step, was launched by
Governor Murphy and Frank A. Pi-
card, chairman of the Michigan Un-
employment Compensation Commis-
sion over a statewide radio broad-
cast.
"Job insurance is not a dole. It is
another formidable weapon in the
war against depression," declared
Governor Murphy.
"Depressions are not necessary.
They don't just have to happen. It
is a defeatist attitude to sit idly by
and so dismiss them.
"The thing to do is to fight depres-
sions. And you must fight intelligent-
ly. The fight will be won by the way
you plan it; by the way you attack
the enemy; by the will to win. It will
not be won if we sit back, reconciled
to the fact that such things as de-
pressions have to happen.
"We must fight with every wea-
pon at our command."
The Governor pointed to the $3,
500,000 a week expected to be paidto
eligible totally unemployed men and
women after Aug. 1 as a powerful
weapon to be used against depression.

"No one can tell me that it was
ever intended that thousands should
starve or be on the verge of star-
vation, in this prosperous country,
while hundreds enjoy the bounties of
life.
"I, for one, cannot accept that
theory without question. We must
first feed our hungry.
"Who or what brought them their
want, is something to then deter-
mine.
"Rescuers don't extinguish the fire
first and then save the inmates of the
burning building. Our first thought
must be for human life, for susten-
ance of children and mothers threa-
tened through joblessness brought on
by depression.
"Job insurance benefits are design-
ed for this purpose. They come at an
opportune time.
"Thd people of Michigan need
every penny the Commission can
rightfully disburse.
"The Commission is conscious of

the rights of beneficiaries entitled to
receive benefits. Every legitimate
step toward speed in accepting, ac-
counting and paying claims has been
provided.
"The work is new, the personnel is
new. Employers have made some mis-
takes in reporting wages; workers
have been and will continue to be
slow in furnishing information for
the records. These factors may tend
to slow up the procedure.
"But we will fight that, too, if it
developes-and by fighting it will
overcome obstacles that caused delay
in other states."
The Governor commended Mr. Pi-
card, Commissioners Henry A. Mont-
gomery, John Reid and Abner E.
Larned, Executive Director for their
tireless effort to administer the law.
Co-ordinator William H. Frater,

personnel director of Cadillac Mo-
tor Company, loaned to the Commis-
sion by General Motors Corporation
at no cost to the State, Edward Fish-
er, Walter Chrysler, William S.
Knudsen and other industrial lead-
ers, Governor Murphy said, deserved
credit for the existence of healthier
understanding between worker and
employer.
Reasearch Is Augmented

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