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August 16, 1938 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1938-08-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publ:cationi n the Bulletiniscons.ructive notice to all members of th
Vuniversity. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:00 a.m. on Saturday-

Japanese Troops Press On To Hankow At Rate Of Mile-A-Day


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al
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V DOC~ r ;SNHCENG
~ ~ 'JUN4E ,ATTACKS HERALD .
in _ ai. UA.U&,. t bbWIIH

Guinea Pigs Or School Children
High School Students Say B(

(Continued from Page 3)

1 U0. !0PLAN RID
12CIANG KMI-SEK HADQUATEASd

A - 4-0 D1 ANKUW PUSH -
,- 9 !?INFANTRY PENETRATION KWEICHIH
HANYANG
IE A* JUE CAPTURED
JNE BOONBLASTNGMA JL CEN
HUKOWTAKEN BY APANESE AS BASE
x 1D~gU FOR DRIVE ACROSS LAKE POYA6.
'.;-KxUu ( GATEWAY TO NORTHERN KIAN(51,
JULY ROUTE FOR DRIVE TO BREAK
AUG SCN E OF 5 CANTON- IANKOW RAILROAD-
13 PRESENT FGHT TEIAND TO NANCHANO, CHINESE
SN1
1* a
)JULY RAILROAD FORTIFIED T)010 20 3040 50
30 PROTECT NANC4ANG NANCHANG - -.. -.
_MIILE Sl

i

naturally as a part of their desire
to know how a home may be beauti-
fied. Music was introduced through
glee club and orchestra and the
standard of music studied raised
slowly. Pure mathematics, a subject
students will sometimes avoid, was
soon seen to be necessary as a part of
the business of buying, selling and as
related to scientific study. Altogether
these quite average boys and girls
found thinking pleasant.
School plays, the lunchroom, va-
rious and. sundry entertainments all
suggested new problems. The stu-
dents were, of their own initiative,
learning that life is of one piece. Ap-
parently they thoroughly enjoyed
their six years' schooling. They
learned to know each other, their
families, their teachers, and to put
their own minds in order. They
learned what Fascism, Communism,
Democracy meant and why these
words were in every daily paper. Nor
did they come out lopsided in their
interests. Starting young, they
learned the coordination of school,
community and country. Trips to
factories, to various cities, to slums,
to all places of interest broadened
their picture of America. This very
simple and gay account by a group of
students learning cooperation and

self-direction is encouraging. The
book will interest all teachers and
should interest most parents.
Warstler Bats Phils To
5-3 Victory Over Bees
PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 15-)(A--Led
by Rabbit Warstler, who blasted a
triple and two singles in four trips
td the plates and scored two runs, the
Boston Bees, today bagged 13 hits
off two Phillies pitchers to nose out
the tail-enders 5 to 3.
A single by West, an .infield out
on which West took third when the
bag was uncovered, and Fletcher's
double gave the Bees the deciding
run in the eighth. In the ninth they
added another for good measure on
singles by Warstler and Garms and
a sacrifice.
Dick Errickson, w h o relieved
Johnny Lanning after the Phils had
tied the score at 3-all in the seventh,
was the winning pitcher. Sylvester
Johnson gave up four of the Boston
runs and was charged with the defeat.

-1

The map says it's about 600 miles from Shanghai to Hangkow by river, but in the year the Japanese have
been hammering their way up the Yangtze toward Chiang-Kai-Shek's Nationalist Capital, they've averaged a
little more than a mile a day, and still have more than 100s miles to go before reaching the city. This up-to-date
Associated Press map shows important stages in the advance.

O.D.MOR RILL
314 S. State St.
Typewriters, Stationery,
Student and Office Suppies
Since 1908 Phone 6815

I

FORD REHIRES 24,000
DETROIT, Aug. 15-(VP)--Approxi-
mately 24,000 workers returned to the
Ford Motor Car Co. plant today as
the company resumed production of
its 1938 (CQ) models. The company
shut down a fortnight ago for the
annual inventory.

.rm~~ m

I

Uncle George Rides Pony Express Again

7The

i

ichigan
Alumnus

I

nA adli~g 11L M LtOPeAI dic1 With his saddlebag strapped behind him, 88-year-old "Uncle George"
Main Reading Room, the Periodical
Reading Room, the Medical Reading Ohler, who pony expressed the mail 72 years age, is shown as he waved
Room, and the Circulation Depart- his hat and started off with the mail at London, Ky., at a "star route"
inent from 8 a.m. till 6 p.m., with the celebration. Two other pioneers of the star routes participated.

Wider Security
Act Is Needed
President Declares 'All'
Must Be Included
(Continued from Page 1)
cult for individuals to provide their
own security, Mr. Roosevelt said, and
Government must step in and help
them.,
"We must face the fact," he said,
"that in this country we have a rich
man's security and a poor man's se-
curity and that the Government
owes equal obligations to both.
"National security is not a half
and half matter; it is all or none."
Mr. Roosevelt said the Security Act
did not offer anyone "an easy life-
nor was it ever intended so to do." he
added:
"None of the sums of money paid
out to individuals in assistance or in-
surance will spell anything approach-
ing abundance. But they will furnish
that minimum necessary to, keep a
foothold; and that is the kind of pro-
tection Americans want."
Social Security officials and others
celebrated the birthday of the act,
meanwhile, at a dinner in the hotel
here. Scheduled speakers there in-
cluded Senator Wagner, Secretary
Perkins and Josephine Roche, form-
er Assistant Treasury Secretary in
charge of Public Health activities.
In a statement to the press Chair-
man Arthur Altmeyer of the Social
Security Board mentioned one pos-
sible expansion-the inclusion of
federal health insurance. Altmeyer
said the problem of health protection
was "beginning to appear on the

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