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June 28, 1937 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1937-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN RAILY

MONDAY, JUNE 28,

t

FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY MONDAZ JUNE 28,

;;z_-

Russian Satire
Is Repertory's
FirstOffering
Eight Plays Are Named
For Summer Season's
Dramatic Program
(Continued from Page 1)
Will be given from July 28 to 31..
J. B. Priestley's mystery play, "Dan-
gerous Corner," will furnish the sixth
week's entertainment, August 4
through 7. In it the author shows
the dangers of telling the truth, as
demonstrated by seven people who
cast off the mask of normal hypocrisy
for an evening.
Gilbert and Sullivan's most famous
comic opera, "H.M.S. Pinafore," which
will be presented with the cooperation
of the School of Music, will be the
seventh presentation, August 11
throughe14. Previous joint productions
with the music school, "The Choco-
late Soldier," in 1935, and "The Pi-
rates of Penzance," of last year,
proved extremely popular and led to
the planning of "Pinafore" as one of
the main attractions of this year's
season.,
The final offering of the Players
will be Robert Turney's "Daughters
of Atreus," rated by George Jean
Nathan as the outstanding play of
the current New York season. In it
the author presents the entire Aga-
memnon-Electra cycle, condensed for
the first time into a single play. It
will be given August 17, 18 and 19.
Valentine B. Windt, Director of
Play Production, will again be in
charge of the Repertory season. He
will be assisted once more by Whit-
ford Kane, distinguished actor and
director at present starring in the
New York production, "Excursion,"
as guest director. Frederic O. Cran-
dall and Claribel Baird, both familiar,
to Ann Arbor audience for the past'
several seasons, will be assistant di-
rectors. Miss Baird will be a mem-
ber of the University faculty next
year, it has just been announced.
Alexander Wyckoff, a member of the
Player's staff for four seasons, will'
again be art director, while ,Evelyn
Cohen:will once more direct the cos-
tume designing.
The cast of "The Path of Flowers"
features Charles Harrell, Mary Pray
and Sarah Pierce respectively in the
leading roles as Ivan Zavyalov, young
Communist leader and radio orator,
Tanya, one of his sweethearts and
Masha, his wife. Virginia Frink plays
the part of Vera Gassgolder, a Com-
munist vamp, whose husband, Dmitri,
is played by Edward Jurist. Hattie
Bell Ross portrays a drunken grand-
mother, while Clarible Baird and
Nancy Bowman play the two moth-
ers. Morlye Baer and Ralph Bell
complete the cast.

Large Visiting
Staff To Come
For Summer
(Continued from Page 1)
in the elements of the language
through a specially prepared series of
reading materials. He will be assist-
ed by Chih-Pei Sha, Associate in Or-
iental Languages at the University of
California.
Dr. Healey Willan, Lecturer and
Examiner of Music and University
Organist at the University of Toron-
to, will be a member of the
School of Music. Born in Dalham,
England, Dr. Willan received a di-i
ploma in music at 19 and at 23 was
organist at St. John's, Kensington.
In Toronto he organized the "Tu-
dor Singers," an a capella choir spe-
cializing in songs of the Tudor
period. He has composed a large
number of songs, choruses and or-I
gan works. At present he is workingI
on an opera and a coronation march.
Other outstanding men who will be
here this summer include Dr. Frank-
lin Edgerton, of Yale University, who
is considered the most outstanding.
contemporary Indologist, and Dr.
Wilson G. Smillie, Professor of Pub-
H lic Health at Harvard University. Dr.
Smillie has been associated with the
Health Division of the Rockefeller
Institute and is at present Science'
Director of its International Health
Division. He was a member of the
Summer Session last year.
Visiting Professors
Other visiting professors will be:
Dr. Bernard Bloch, of Brown Univer .
sity; Dr. Herman Browe, Supervis-
ing Director of the Detroit Elemen-
tary Schools; Gerald Bush, Belton;
Harold Bachman, of the University
of Chicago; Dr. Wallace Caldwell, of
the University of North Carolina; Dr.
William Carr, Washington, D.C.; An-
drew Casner, of the University of
Illinois; Yuen Chang of Nanking,
China, at present a member of the
University faculty; Evelyn Cohen,
New York; Dr. Dennis Cooke, Nash-'
ville, Tenn.; Dr. Bessie Gambrill, of
Yale University; Rudolph Gjelsness,
of the University of Arizona.
Dr. Frederick Hamil, of Carleton
College; Bryan Heise, Ypsilanti; Dr.
James Hillhouse, of the University
of Minesota; Dr. H. Clifton Hutchins,
Washington, D.C.; Albert Jacobs, of
Columbia University; Whitford Kane,
New York City; Joseph Kleefus, De-
troit; Dr. Hilmar Krueger, of the
University of Wisconsin; Clifford
Lillya, Chicago; Katherine Manning,
New York City; Dr. Arthur Martin,
of 'Ohio State University; Eleanor
Meston, Ypsilanti; Gustavus Ohling-

Regents Given
Pledges, Gifts
Of $90,0000
(Continued from Page 1)

II

versity of Michigan Club of Wash.,
D.C., for the Washington Research
Fund; $100 from Mrs. Gordon W.
Kingsbury of Detroit for the Ben-
jamin Sayre Tuthill land fund; $75
from Dr. George W. Bartelmez of
Chicago and Dr. M. Wharton Young
of Wash., D.C., for the G. Karl Huber
Memorial Volume; and $16 from the
Chinese Students Club for their loan
fund.
Mrs. William L. Clements of Bay
City gave a collection of books and
furniture to the William L. Clem-
ents Library, and Miss Lucy Chapin
of Ann Arbor gave the same library
the S. A. Mitchell map of Michigan
in 1835. Miss Chapin also gave the
Law Library a grandfather clock in
memory of her brother, the late Vol-
ney Chapin, for many years assistant
librarian there.
The ping pong table and the cro-
quet set were gifts to the state psy-
chopathic hospital here from Mrs.
Edward Hard of Ann Arbor and the
Ann Arbor Colony of New England
Women respectively.
The Regents reported pledges,
previously announced, of $75,000 from
Chicago alumni and $3,500 from
alumni in Rochester, N.Y., for dormi-
tory construction.
The resignation of Prof. Arne Jak-
kula of the civil engineering depart-
ment was accepted, Prof. Jakkula
planning to join the faculty at Texas
A.&M. College. Dr. John Howard
Ferguson of the University of Ala-
bama was appointed assistant profes-
sor of Pharmacy, and Elmore S. Pet-
tyjohn, chief engineer of the Mervin
Building Corp., Chicago, was appoint-
ed assistant professor of chemical en-
gineering. Miss Marian Kalkman was
appointed superintendent of nurses at
the state psychopathic hospital.
er, Toledo, O.; Mary Parsons, Lec-
turer in Library Science; Jesse Or-
mondroys, Swarthmore, Pennsylva-
nia; Clyde Pettus, of Emory Univer-
sity, Georgia; Dr. Paul Rankin, De-
troit; Dr. George Rice, of the Univer-
sity of California; Dr. Leo Rockwell,
of Colgate University.
Others On Faculty
Ralph Rush, Cleveland Heights;
Agnes Samuelson, Des Moines, Iowa;
Charles Shaw, Swarthmore College;
Dr. Verner Sims, of the University
of Alabama; Theo Werle, Lansing;
Ralph Wilson, of the University of
Idaho, Southern Branch; Alexander
Wyckoff, New York City; Charles
Yard, Michigan Municipal League;
and Dr. Jacob Zeitlin, of the Univer-
sity of Illinois.

1~~

i
i

In

MEN

Ant

SArbor,
E'conomica.,l

It's

More

to SendYou Clothes
toheL here is no longer any need to send your
laundry home nor is it more economical,
for our new ROUGH DRY (semi-finish)
bundle for students is areal money-saver
for broken-down allowances. This gives
you 'finished laundry on shirts, hand-
kerchiefs, and socks. Underwear and pa-
jamas are washed, dried, ready for wear.

Price per Pound .
(Minimum Bundle -50c)

.IlOc

Wv

Fkr Extra
Full Dress Shirts not includedi

in this Service

1i ,

Shoot 'em in.
Before the Fourth

if you

see

Spots on

Sox,

Handkerchiefs,

I

EI ,/

SAMPLE BUNDLE

3 SHIRTS
6 HANDKERCHIEFS

3 PAIRS

OF SOX

Extra,

$

FINISHED
SERVICE
WASHED - - DRIED
FOLDED
READY TO WEAR

2 SUITS UNDERWEAR
2 BATH TOWELS

pair

. . . .
Extra

. 3c
.. Ic

the "WHITES" of your eye
C5 {ICHIGAN MEN and WOMEN are traditionally well-
dressed . . . In summer it's "lights" and "whites" And over
the holiday especially you'll want to look your best
GREENE'S superior method of cleaning "lights," as exempli-
fied in the approval given it by the Goodall Co., makers of
Palm Beach.
iREENE'S
~~CLEANERS & DYERS
IRO CLEAN

TOTAL COST-99e

E' !I
r

By sending your clothes to the local laundries, remember there is

no parcel

post costs to pay.

Arrangements can be made to call for and deliver your

laundry to your Ann Arbor home.
For This New ROUGH DRY SERVICE, Call any of the following Laundries:

VARSITY LAUNDRY
Phone 2=3123
WHITE SWAN LAUNDR
.A rnDfV (' lrALM1kuf eAIr A ALII#

TROJAN LAUNDRY
Phone 9495
Y KYER LAUNDRY
reA I ,

I

1

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