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July 13, 1937 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1937-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JULY is,

11 ParticipantsI
In Vote Fraud
Are Released
Full Paroles Are Granted
To All But O'Hara And
Former Sen. Wilkowski'
LANSING, July 12.-( P)-Eleven
Detroit men, convicted of participa-
tion in an election recount fraud in
Detroit, were released from prison
today with full paroles.
They are:
Lester Currier, who returns to his
old job in the stock department of
an automobile manufacturing com-
pany.
James Garrett, who is to enter a
hardware business with his brother.
Joseph Grsihaber, who will return
to his job of repairing fountain pens.
Charles Lark, who was given back
his old job in the Hamtramck City
Comptroller's Office.
William J. Wilson, a painter.
Anthony J. Gallagher, who will be-
come a dry goods clerk.
Vincent Murphy, who will take a
job with a messenger service.
T. Emmett McKenzie, who will go to
Washington to' become a legal clerk
in an attorney's office.
Joseph W. Neil, who will be em-
ployed as custodian of property for a
relative.
Chester Pons, a printer.
Alfred J. Skiffington, a shipping
clerk.E
Currier, Garrett, Gresihaber, Lark,r
Gallagher and Wilson were released
from the Detroit House of Correction,1
the others from the state prison off
Southern Michigan.
State Senator Anthony J. Wilkow-
ski and Elmer B. O'Hara, formerl
chairman of the Democratic State
Central Committee, convicted as orig-
inators of the fraud, still are in prison.
Those released today were convictedt
of irregularities in the recounting of
ballots cast for Secretary of State in
the 1934 general election. They had
served 'in prison since last December.
Governor Murphy commuted their
sentences and approved the paroles
last week.

Composer Dies

American Falls
Will Be Extinct,
Geologist Says
Monopolization Of Waters
On Canadian Side To Be
Result Of 1,000 Years
(Continued from Page 1)

I
E
I

I I

.

George Gershwin, 38, whose
compositions of modern music
opened the doors of many concert
halls to jazz, died in Hollywood af-
ter an operation for brain tumor.
,Among his better known works was
"Rhapsody In Blue."

Morgenroth Leads
Campus Swim Meet
Bill Morgenroth got away to an
early lead in the all-campus swim-
mning meet yesterday when he stroked
his way to first place in the 25-yard
free style event. His time of 12.2
seconds netted him 100 points.
Lee Lyon finished second with John
3millie third and Jack Flowers and
THugh Henry finishing in that order.
They earned 80, 60, 40 and and 20
Joints respectively for their compe-
tition in the first of 10 events.
Sponsor Swimming
Class For Children
A swimming class for children will
be offered at the Union pool at 11
i.m. on Monday, Wednesday, and Fri-
day. Miss Mary Redden, an American
Red Cross Life Saver and an exper-
enced swimer. will be in charge of
he class instruction.
A low fee will be charged for this
nstruction. This class will start Wed-
nesday, July 14.

ter having losts its sediment while
standing in Lake Erie.
The whirlpool above the Falls, one
of the most-discussed phenomena of
the region. Professor Bullard called
the result of an interglacial period
falls filled with soil by the retreat
of the glacier across whose course
the upper portion of the Niagara cut,
causing a gigantic washout, and leav-
ing the current pursuing a circular
course, doubling back and diving un-
der its own stream.
The Horseshoe Falls, across which
flows 95 per cent of the water, are
actually only half Canadian, he
pointed out, since the United tSates-
Canada boundary line passes through
the center. The American Falls, in
spite of the small amount of water
flowing over it, is preserved bythe
debris at the bottom, which helps
prevent erosion, he indicated.
Veteran Engineer
Decorated By King
LONDON, July 12. -(P1 - Tom
Clarke, veteran engineer of the train
"Coronation Scot," brought the King
and Queen into Euston Station today.
"Come on Tom," Sir Josiah Stamp,
chairman of the railroad, called to
him. "The King has something for
you.''
Clarke, 48 years with the railroad,
hastily put on a clean pair of overalls,
wiped his boots and walked to the
King's compartment.
There, from his Majesty's hands,
the Engineer received the medal of
the Order of the British Empire for
"Meritorious Service."
PRINCE MAKES HOLE IN ONE
John Prince joined the select fra-
ternity of the hole in one club Sat-
urday when he tipped his tee shot
into the cup on the 150-yard fifth
hole at the University golf course.
Using a No. 6 iron, he lofted the ball
to within 6 feet of the hole, into
which it then rolled. Nelson Burn-
ham and Bob Austin were witnesses
to the feat.

Softball Play
Be ins In One
League Today
The first round in the Education
League of the summer softball play
arranged by the Intramural Sports
Department will .be held at 4 p.m.
today on South Ferry Field when the
Panthers meet the Bees and the In-
dians oppose the Tigers, it was an-
nounced by Randolph W. Webster.
Each team will meet every other
team in the league twice during the
summer session. Games are sched-
uled for Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Plans are being made to hold a play-
off between the champions of the
regular Intramural League and the
Education League, Mr. Webster said.
Following is the complete schedule
for the Education Leagues:
Tuesday, July 13-Panthers vs.
Bees; Indians vs. Tigers.
Thursday, July 15-Panthers vs.
Indians; Bees vs. Tigers.
Tuesday, July 20-Panthers vs. Ti-
gers; Bees vs. Indians.
Thursday, July 22-Panthers vs.
Bees; Indians vs. Tigers.
Tuesday, July 27-Panthers vs. In-
dians; Bees vs. Tigers.
Thursday, July 29-Panthers vs.
Tigers; Bees vs. Indians.
RETURNS OLD BOOK
KALAMAZOO, July 10.-()-E. C.'
Vincent, Kalamazoo, returned to
State Representative James A. Weis-
sert a book he borrowed in 1903 when
they were both Harvard students.
SUMMER'
SLACKS
Sanforized Shrunk

b
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t
ii
n

Pens - Typewriters - Supplies
"Writers Trade With Rider's"
RIDER'S
302 S. State St.
FASHION'S SPOTLIGHT IS ON
]Luminous Stockings

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by
Artcra ft

e.

Figure

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