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June 30, 1937 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1937-06-30

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30, 1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Major Standings

Burton Memorial Tower With Proposed Unii.'uersiy Music Center

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W. L.
New York...........38 21
Chicago ............36 25
Boston ..............31 24
Detroit.............34 27
Dleveland ...........29 29
Washington .........26 33
Athlktics ............20 37
St. Louis ............30 38
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 3, Detroit 2.
Cleveland 7, St. Louis 5.
New York 3, Philadelphia 2.
Poston 2, Washington 2.
(Game called at end of 12th,
darkness).

Pct.
.644
.590
.564
.557
.500
.441
.351
.345

Games Today
Detroit at Chicago.
St. Louis at Cleveland.
Boston at Washington.
New York at Philadelphia.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W. L. Pet.
Chicago ............37 24 .607
New York ...........37 25 .597
St. Louis ...........35 26 .574
Pitfirbur l ...........34 27 .557
Brooklyn ...........27 31 .466
Boston..............24 36 .400
Cincinnati ..........24 37 .393
Phillie . ............. 24 37. .393
Yesterday's Results .
Boston 1, Brooklyn 0 (12 innings)
New York 4, Philadelphia 3 (11
innings).
Pittsburgh 2-13, Cincinnati 1-6.
Chicago 11, St. Louis 9.
Games today
Chicago at St. Louis.
Brooklyn at Boston (2).
Philadelphia at New York.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati (night).

Scene Of Annual Prof.White Named
t eaI Of A.S.T.M.
.UC y l' t Prof. Albert E. W hite. dire tor of
Is ti on uro I S1a5the deprtment of nnen re-
search, has been elected president of
,the American Society for Testing Ma-
Huron Hills Country club has been terials, succeeding A. C. Ficldner.
chosen as the scene of the 11th an- chief of the technological branch of
nual city golf tournament, to be held the United States Bureau of Mines.
Aug. 16 to 21, it was announced yes-I He was named to the new position
terday by the committee in charge. Sunday at the opening session of the
It was in 1931 that the tourney 40th annual meeting of that society
was last held on this course, aind it in New York. For the past two years
was at that time that the defend- he has served as vice-president.
ing chamuion, Woody Malloy, form- A member of the Universihy he-
er Varsity golfer, won his first title. ulty since 1911, Professor White ha
He has won the cup five times. been the recipient of iay honor,.
He headed the metallurgical 1bran;ch,
Prizes will be awarded in two divi- inspection division, of the ordin:ucee
sions, the junior for all boys 18 years department of the United States arumy
of age and younger, and the senior from 1917 to 1919 and was the first
group for all others. All amateur president of the American Society of
golfers who have resided in Ann Ar- Mechanical Engineers.
bor .for the past six months are eli-
gible to compete in the tourney. SHOOK IS KILLED
Free practice rounds at seven local ADRIAN, June 29.-(P-)-Donald
courses, to be arranged over a two- Shook, 25, of Tecumseh, was killed
week period previous to the qualify- and a companion injured severely la te
ing round, will be extended to those today in a crossing accident at Brit-
paying the two dollar entrance fee. ton, 10 miles northeast of Adrian.
In the 10 years that the tourna-
ment has been in existence University Varsity captain. Woody's older bro-
men have won just exactly six times. ther, Johnny, now professional at the
Since he won in 1931, Woody has Ann Arbor Golf and Outing Club, won
dropped the crown only one year, and the first two years, and Carlton Wells
that was to Cal Markham, former won in 1929 and 1930.
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre

Pictured above are gill Auditorium (left), the proposed new home for tic School of Music (right) and the Bur
lbuses the Baird Carillon. The carillon, the third largest in the world, con-ists of 53 bells weighing more than 125
A. Baird, '95L, of Kansas City, Mo. The first regular concert of the sea ion will be given at 7:30 p.m. tomor
School of Music, University carillonneur.

tA'n Memorial
5,000 pounds.

Tower (center), which
It is a gift of Charles

CLASSIFED
DIRECTORY

Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-3241.
The classified columns close at five
o'clpek previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra chiarge.
Cash in advance llc per reading line
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
(on basis of five average words to line).
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
thre~e lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY WANTED
Priced Reasonably
All WorkEGuaranteed
STUDENT LIST
Shirts.......................12c
Shorts.......................4c
Tops .......................... 4c
Handkerchiefs ................2c
Socks .......................... 3c
Pajamas................. .10c
CO-ED LIST
Slips ............ ............10e
Dresses ........................25c
Panties ........................ 7c
Handkerchiefs .................2c
Pajamas ................10c to 15c
Hose (pr.) ..................... 3c
Silks, wools our specialty. All bundles
done separately-no markings. Call
for and deliver. Phone 5594. Silver
Laundry. 607 E. Hoover. 3x
EXPERIENCED laundress doing stu-
dent laundry. Call for and deliver.
Phone 4863. 2x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. Ix
FOR RENT
THREE AND ONE-HALF BLOCKS
from campus. Two doubles, two
singles. 327 E. William. Phone
2-2203. 601
3 SINGLE rooms for girls near cam-
pus. Clean, newly decorated. Home
privileges. Phone 3968. 606
FURNISHED APT. with private bath
and shower. Continuous hot water.
Garage or parking space. 422 E..
Washington. Phone 8544. 605
SINGLE and double rooms for girls.
Large and airy, large yard, trees.
1511 Washtenaw. Tel. 3851. 603
B E A U T IF U L L Y furnished brick
apartment for summer. 2 bedrooms,
$60 month plus utilities, 1506 Pack-
ard. , 602
RENT: Cool large rooms downstairs.
Reasonable. 2-2159. 314 E. Liberty.
FOR RENT: Single room and half
of suite. Furnished. Above average.
Reasonably priced. 720 Catherine.
Phone 2-3509. 611
FOR RENT: Cool large rooms. Down
stairs. Reasonable. 2-2159. 314 E.
Liberty. 608
WANTED
WANTED: Room for male student in
exchange for light work. Near cam-
pus. Phone 3958. 612

Schedule Given Wo
For Summer's I
Tank ActivitiesBro
The B.
Burton 1
Webster Will Be Director by Prof.
school, w
Of Annual Swimming cert for;
Competition 7:30 p.
bells, m
carillon
The schedule for the annual sum- lar feat
mer swimming competition in the In- program
tramural Sports Building pool was Donat
announced yesterday by Randolph W. '95L, pr
[ City, MO
Webster, who will direct this activity. bells, w
As in previous summers there will pounds,.
be eight stroke events, a plunge for largest(
distance and diving. The all-around ly more
champion and runner-up and the I pitch of
smallest
event winners will be given the offi- sounds t
cial Intramural medal at cost. 1 one-half
An individual may enter any num- The B
ber of events, Mr. Webster said. The by subs
all-around champion is determined zens an
on a point basis which awards 100 houses t
points to the winner in each event, 10th floo
80 points for second place, 60 for The bell
third, 40 for fourth and 20 for fifth. frame n
The first event, the 25 yard free and 18 b
style, will be held at 4:30 p.m., Mon- Accorc
day, July 12. Thereafter the events Charles1
will be held at the same time on advance
Mondays and Wednesdays until all and eac
10 have been completed. curately,
Following is the complete schedule: it was m
25-yard free style-July 12
25-yard back stroke-July 14
25-yard breast stroke-July 19
50-yard free style-July 21
50-yard back stroke-July 26
50-yard breast stroke-July 28
100-yard free style-Aug. 2
75-yard medley swim-Aug. 4
Distance plunge-Aug. 9 Gymnasi
Diving-Aug. 11
Three required and one optional Univen
dives will be on the program in the beginnin
diving competition, Mr. Webster said. day and
For those who wish to use the pool o'clock.
only for informal recreation the pool this wee]
is open from 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon Pi Lar

Baird Carillon, housed in the
Memorial Tower and played
Wilmot Pratt of the music
will boom forth its first con-
Summer Session students at;
i. tomorrow. Concerts on the
aking up the third largest
in the world, will be a regu-
ure of the Summer Session
1.
ed by Charles A. Baird,
ominent alumnus of Kansas
o., the carillon consists of 531
eighing more than 125,000
in chromatic sequqence. Thel
(Bourdon) bell weighs slight- I
than 12 tons and has the
E flat below middle C. Thej
bell weighs 12 pounds and'
he note of G sharp four and
octaves above the Bourdon.
urton Memorial Tower. built
criptions of Ann Arbor citi-
d alumni of the University,
he carillon in a chamber on
or, 120 feet from the ground.
s are hung rigidly on a steel
pore than 30 feet in heightl
by 26 feet at the base.
ding to many experts, the
Baird Carillon represents an
over previous installations
h bell has been tuned ac-
unlike in the old days when
nere accident when the. tones
AMY OFFICIAL
BULLJETI1
Continued from Page 2)
ium by Wednesday.
rsity Men and Women: The
g dancing class meets' Mon-
Wednesday evenings at 7:30
All interested must sign up
kd
mbda Theta: All members of

1'
:
J
{
i

of similar bells were full, mellow and{
rich.
There is a great deal of discussion
concerning where is the best place to
hear the carillon. When it was first
in the process of construction, many
thought it could be heard from great
distances. However, this is impossible
because the volume of the rigidly
hung carillon is considerably less
than that of swinging bells.
The four largest bells are located'
in the first tier at each of the corn-
ers of the frame, the Bourdon hang-I
ing in the southwestI

rid's Third Largest Carillon
Io Present Concert Toiorrow

row by Prof. Wilmot Pratt of the
is brought into contact with the bell
by the pressure of the carillonneur's
hand or foot on the keys or pedals of
the clavier which transmit this
"stroke" to the clapper by means of
wires. It is not possible or desirable
to create the volume of sound in a
carillon that can be created in a
church bell.
However, the listener to the carillon
should more or less determine where
he can hear the bell most satisfac-
torily to him. In general, he can not
be too close to the bell, for then the
mechanical sounds and the "strike
tone" will be too prominent and un-
pleasing. On the other hand, if the
listener is too far away, the rapidly

'PA
Sing
Season

In a church bell the clapper swingsj
from a central pivot in the head of
the bell and strikes either lip of the
,bell with full force. In the carillon
bell the clapp5er is held in a position
very close to the point of impact and
the prominent educators who will be
present are:
Charles Glenn, Superintendent of
Schools, Birmingham, Ala., President
of' the American Association of
School Administrators. He will speak
briefly on the subject, "Some En-
couraging Developments in South-
ern Education."
Lyman B. Bryson of Columbia
University, who will give a short talk
on "Encouraging Developments in the
Field of Adult Education."
Willis A. Sutton, Superintendent of
Schools, Atlanta, Ga.
S. D. Shankland, Executive Secre-
tary of the American Association of
School Administrators, Washington,
D. C.
H. V. Church, Chicago, Executive
Secretary of the Department of Sec-
ondary School Principals of the Na-
tional Education Association.
H.M.S. Pinafore Tryout: All those
interested in trying out for either the
,horus or principle parts in this comic
opera to be given August 11, 12, 13,
and 14 by the Michigan Repertory
Players and the School of Music
should report' to the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn 'Theatre today, June 30 at 5
p.m.
Scores may be obtained at Wahr's
Book store and should be brought to
tryout if possible.
V. B. Windt.
(Continued on Page 4)

dissolving sound of the small bells
will be lost and only the "boom" of
the larger bells will be heard. The
3 listening post should also be chosen
where both high and low notes can
be heard.
The public can probably best hear
the Carillon on the lawn of the
Michigan League or in Felch Park,
about a block east from the League.
One of the special features of the
summer will be the appearance of
Frederick L. Marriott, organist and
carillonneur at the University of Chi-
cago, who will exchange with Pro-
fessor Pratt on July 8 and July 22.
ENDING TONIGHT --
CLAUDETTE
COLBERT
in
"I MET
HIM IN
PARIS"
Charming - Witty - Clever
TOMORROW
"HER
HUSBAND'S
SECRETARY"
JEAN MUIR
BEVERLY ROBERTS
WARREN HULL
Sunday -
"MOUNTAIN MUSIC"

I- - - - -~

---3 r......,.., n 4 ,. r A-1- -- 1

and from 3 to 6 p.m. daily, except on Pi Lambda Theta are cordially in-

Sundays and holidays, he added.
LOST AND FOUND
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA sorority pin
on East University or University
high school. Reward. Phone 4697.
610
LEFT IN Angell Hall rest room, ladie;
ring set with black cameo. Finder
please return to lost and found
department, Room 1, U. Hall. Re-
ward. 609

vited to attend the first business
meeting of the Summer Session this
afternoon at 4:15 p.m. in the Elemen-
tary School Library. Plans for the
summer will be outlined, so come andl
make yourself known to the officers
and members of Xi.
The University of Michigan Sum-
rner Session Dinner for all students
and faculty will be held this evening
in the Michigan Union. Dean Ed-
monson of the School of Education
will be the toastmaster. Some of

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IF YOU

W R I T E,

WE HAVE IT

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THREE DAYS - Starting Today!
TWO FEATURES
IT'S A RIOT OF FUN

CL-B-l-WIL I I f JER"

A Large and Complete Stock of Writing
Materials of Nationally-Advertised Makes
of Considerate Prices.

I

wori

r

TYPEWRITERS
New and Used, Office and Por-
table models. Bought, Sold,
Rented, Exchanged, Cleaned,
Repaired. Also Supplies. Ini-
tial payment of rent may
apply in the event of purchase.
Correspondence Stationery
Student & Office Supplies
Greeting Cards. Novelties

BIiLOWY SUDS
CLEAR WATER RINSE
*LUSTROUS HAIR
5 49C

FOUNTAIN PENS
SHEAFFER, PARKER,
WAHL, EVERSHARP,
WATERMAN and Others.
Priced $1.00 and up
Service Work a Specialty.
TYPEWRITING and
MIMEOGRAPHING
Promptly and neatly done by
experienced operators at mod-
erate rates. Student work a
specialty for 30 years.

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