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July 30, 1937 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1937-07-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
U

.........I r

Sculptor Commemorates Will Rogers

Union, Company Leaders
Plan Conference; Food
Jobbers Fill Orders
BUFFALO N. Y., July 29.-(P)-
Committee for Industrial Organiza-
tion pickets patrolled three strike-
closed packing plants today as union
and company leaders planned a peace
conference tomorrow..
At the same time, the territory's
wholesale food jobbers, a paralyzing,
eight-day truck drivers' strike ended,
worked feverishly to fill a rush of
retail orders.
One house reported it delivered
more sacked sugar today than in any
time in its history. All 44 houses
affected said their delivery facilities
were taxed to the limit.
The truckers, American Federation
of Labor affiliated, went back to work
with a contract which their presi-
dent, Howard F. Toy, labelled "a just
and equable settlement-one of the
bestrever written in this city."
Drawn up through the voluntary
mediation efforts of Dr. John P.
Boland, first head of New York
State's Labor Board, it established
a minimum scale of wages, maxi-
mum working hours, overtime pay,
preferential hiring and vacations.
During their eight-day walkout, the
truckers clamped an embargo on re-
tail deliveries that badly depleted
storekeepers' stocks of butter, eggs,
canned goods, flour and other staples.
Hugh Thompson, CIO regional di-
rector, called concurrently a strike
among union meat packing members,
but illness forced him out of tomor-
row's conference.
The meat packers yesterday sub-
mitted a. contract calling for exclu-
sive collective bargaining rights, a
modified closed shop and wage and
hour adjustments.
Michael Cohn, counsel for one of
the three affected plants, said em-
ployers' representatives had drafted
counter proposals to be presented at
tomorrow's meeting.

Ralph Martin
Reported Dead
From Drowning
He Was One Of Two Men
Caught By Undertow In
Attempted Rescue
Ralph A. Martin, 35 years old, of
Western Springs, Ill., whose drown-
ing at Saugatuck Tuesday night was
reported to Ann Arbor police in an
attempt to notify his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert A. Martin, who live here.
was one of two victims in the rescue
of an unidentified 12-year-old girl
who had been caught in the Lake
Michigan undertow, it was learned
yesterday.
Martin and Frank Hooper, 23 years
old, of Streator, Ill., the other drown-
ing victim, swam out with three other
men, and reached the drowning girl
first. They began to tow her to safe-
ty, but before they reached shore
they became exhausted and sank.
Other members of the party towed
the girl in, but were unable to save
the two men.
Martin's body will be brought here
for funeral services andrburial at 2
p.m. tomorrow. (Saturday). He
was born in Ann Arbor in 1901, grad-

Mrs. Alben Barkley

County To Get
More License
Fees In 1937
Total Received Will Be
$83,341.07 To Almost
Double That Of 1936
Washtenaw County will receive a
sum nearly double the total last year
as its share of automobile license
fees for the second quarter, according
to the sums vouchered yesterday by
Murray D. Van Wagoner, state high-
way commissioner.
The total the county will receive is
$83,341.07, as compared with about
$44,000 received from the state last
year. Ann Arbor's share is up from
$9,168.82 to $17,131.26. The weight
tax returns for the entire state in the
three-month period were nearly $5,-
500,000.
It was pointed out that no settle-
ment has been made yet for gasoline
taxes in either the first or the second
quarer. Payment of the first install-
ment is due soon, and because of the
size of the check the county received
it was at first thought that the gas
voucher had been combined withthe
weight tax payment.
Read Daily Classified Ads

Dance Teacher
Plans Modern
Dance Program
Miss Katherine Manning of the
Humphrey-Weidman dance group in
New York City will give a lecture
demonstration on modern dance at
8:30 p.m. Tuesday in the dance studio
on the second floor of Barbour Gym-
nasium, it was announced yesterday.
Miss Manning is an instructor in
the department of Physical Educa-
tion for women this summer, and
during the year dances as a member
of the Humphrey-Weidman dance
group and assists Miss Doris Humph-
rey of the group.
Beatrice Lovejoy, '37, former stu-
dent manager of the modern dance
club at the University, will assist Miss
Manning in the demonstration.
The event is scheduled to last half
an hour from 8:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday,
and all summer school students in-
terested are invited to attend.
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
eromptly and neatly done by expwt-
,aced operators at moderate pricam.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State titre"i

Mrs. Alben W. Barkley, wife of
the newly elected senate leader,
at last is mistress of "The An-
gles," long-desired mansion near
Paducah, Kentucky.
Irish University
Confers Deoree
on Dr._Bishop
(Continued from Page 1)

- ... 1
Will Rogers, America's famed humorist, would probably have poked
fun at the idea of himself in bronze, but here is Jo Davidson, the dis-
tinguished American sculptor, finishing a model of Rogers for a shrine
in Colorado Springs.
Linguist, Psychologist Do Not
Conflict In 'Meaning'.Discussion

Woodburne, Price Lead
Luncheon Conference Is
Held ByInstitute
(Continued from Page 1)
stated, must consider the history of
the word as it came into the lan-
guage, somtimes with different senses
at different periods of borrowing, but
must consider as more important the
actual usage. An example cited was
"lark," which before 1700 was often
applied to birds vaguely resembling
the true lark, just as a child calls a
cow a dog. The historical dictionary
must recognize this meaning.
"Church," "puritan," and "beauty"
were also named by Dr. Price as words
with interesting histories before 1700.
"The historical dictionary must give
in a definition not only the core of
meaning these words have, such as
you generally recognize now, but also
the peculiar aura or emotional as-
sociation, for it is this latter that
really is important to the dictionary
user. Even the precise meanings of a

color like blue or gray was probably
different three hundred years ago
from what it is now, to say nothing
of the symbolic meaning so frequently
significant in Elizabethan literature.
Although the meaning of a made3
object is easy to define, stated Dr.
Price, for its meaning is its function,
plus occasionally its appearance and
the manner of its use, the meaning
of an idea is harder to determine. It
was here that he got in a dig at the
philosophers. In the recent book,
"The Meaning of Meaning," Richards
and Ogden, according to Professor
Price, stated that "goods," for in-
stance, really has only one meaning.
Numerous illustrations to show the
unsoundness of such an idea were ad-
vanced by Dr. Price, who asked
whether "good" has really the same
meaning when applied to "bed,"
"baby," "kick," and "God." "Ogden
and Richards," he remarked, "may
say these are only arbitrary nuclei
of meaning, but people who use a
dictionary want to know precisely
what these nuclei are, for they are
really distinct meanings."

eating from Ann Arbor High and one section. Since then six young
later, in 1925, from the University of priests have studied aththe University
Michigan. Since his graduation he to learn the modern librarian meth-
has been a certified public accountant ods.
with the Edward A. Gore Co., of Chi- One of the foremost in his field, Dr.
cago. Bishop came to the University in
1915 from the Library of Congress, in
Washington, D.C., where he was sup-
Thesis Instruction erintendent of the reading room from
1907 to 1915. Previously he had been
Published By Good head cataloguer of the library of
Princeton University 1902-04.
"An Introduction to Thesis Writ- Dr. Bishop was graduated from the
ing," a book which represents the University in 1892, receiving his mas-
standards followed in the presenta- ter of arts degree in 1893.
tion of term papers and theses in The University of Ireland degree
the education school, has recently was conferred July 8, along with pre-
been written and published by War- sentations of like honors to Dr. Hugh
ren R. Good of the School of Edu- O'Neill Hencken, of the Peabody
cation. Museum, Harvard University; Prof.
The manual is intended to give in Carl W. von Sydon, of Sweden; Prof.
concise form the essential guidance Frederick N. Robinson, of Harvard,
needed in perparing summaries of was also given his degree insabsentia.
professional literature. whether for Dr. Bishop's plans to go to China
term papers of the graduate theses, within the next month, his trip con-
and to give assistance in the poduc- tingent on the outcome of the pres-
tion of superior manuscript. ent strife there.

I

SUMMER CLEARANCE
of All SPRING and SUMMER HATS
at very attractive prices.
ALL WH I TES
Reduced $1. O$2.50
DANA RICHARDSON
309 South State Street -- At the Dillon Shop

SEA BRIGHT, N. J., July 29.-(M)-
Wilmer L. Allison, a tenacious Texan
who wouldn't be beaten, and Bobby
Riggs of Los Angeles, who hasn't lost
a match this year, gained the finals
of the 50th annual Sea Bright invi-
tation tennis tournament today in
a pair of thrilling five-set matches.
Allison, whose current comeback
campaign has resulted in triumphs
at Spring Lake and Longwood, de-
feated Frank X. Shields, former Davis
Cup star, 1-6, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 7-5.
Riggs disposed of Jiro Yamagishi of
Japan, the last foreign threat in the
grass court classic, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 2-6,
6-3.
CLIPPER STARTS FOR EUROPE
BOTWOOD, Newfoundland, July
29.-(P)-The Pan-American Clipper
III took off from Botwood Harbor at
5:05 p.m. (E.S.T.) today on her sec-
ond eastward, trans-Atlantic flight
in preparation for a regular commer-
cial air service between Europe and

\" N'

1 a

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Have

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be ruined!

Our meal will

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416 West Huron

Dial 8270

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