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July 17, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 17,

All-Star Voting Is
U pset By Early
Western Results
Chuck Bernard Followed
Closely By Gorman For
Center Position
PetoskeyDisplaced
Everhardus Also Running
Third For Halfback As
Wistert Draws Ahead
Returns from the West Coast have
upset much of the early balloting for
the all-star grid team which will meet
the Chicago Bears August 31 in Chi-
cago according to -compilations re-
leased yesterday by the Chicago
Tribune.
The Tribune, with associated news-
papers, is sponsoring the nationwide
poll to select a squad of 27 from this
year's college graduates to meet the
national professional champions in
a charity game. Selections for an
eleven-man team may be sent to the
All-Star Game Editor, The Chicago
Tribune, Chicago.
California Dominates Voting
Sectionalism to a great extent was
represented in the West Coast returns,
with California dominating the vot-
ing. Typical of the balloting was the
team selected by Cotton Warburton,
all-American quarterback, who is in-
eligible for the game because he has
another year at Southern California.
"I; don't know enough about men
in other sections to comment intelli
gently," he said.
Despite the failure of Coast fans
to extend recognition to East and
Mid-West players, George Sauer of
Nebraska continued far ahead of all
competitors for fullback. His grand
total of 9,278 votes was far ahead,
although Moose Krause of Notre
Dame continued to lead all candidates
i total votes polled, with 9,748.
Bernard Still Leading
Although Tommy Gorman forged
to the front in the race for the pivot
selection, Chuck Bernard of Michigan
was still considered the logical, choice
for center. His total of 6,279 led Gor-
man with 5,316 and Kreuger of Mar-
quet'te with 3,595. Ray Oen of Minne-
sota slipped to fifth in the center
voting.
Michigan's other candidates con-
tinued to stay among the leaders.
Whitey Wistert, despite the support
extended Schwammel of Oregon
State, trailed Krause in the voting
for tackle, with 6,329.
Caurinus of St. Mary's and Smith
of Washington other Coast stars, who
were heavily supported in the West,
rose to second and third places in the
ballotting for the end positions, dis-
placing Ted Petoskey of Michigan for
second place behind Joe Skladany
of Pitt. Skladany has 8,792, Caurinus
7,373, Smith 6,463, and Petoskey, 4,-
462.
Everhardus Favored
Herman Everhardus appeared to be
a favorite to gain a squad -position,
although Nick Lukats of Notre Dame
had displaced him for second place
in the balloting for halfback. Beattie
Feathers of Tennessee leads the half-
backs with 8,880, followed closely by
Lukats with 6,537 and Everhardus
with 6,179.
Tickets for the game, which is to
be played in Soldiers' Field, went on
sale this week. Balloting for the
squad positions is to close July 25, and
a contest to select a college coach
to direct the squad will be held, fol-
lowing that date.
Both squads are to report for train-
ing August 15. The all-star squad will
train ot Northwestern University, and
all facilities there have been made
available.

Jean Kyer Leads
State Golf Tourney

Cavalcade, Winner Of Great Arlington Classic

Money Policies
DiscussedBy
Prof Watkins
Traces Problems Which
H a v e Confronted The
Administration

Held By Nazis

Short-Wave Radio
BringsCap News
(continued from Page 1)
"U. S. Forestry Service has graded
road entering camp.
"Movies are shown in the mess hall
occasionally. Lectures are being
made of work done at the camp. De
W7DKC Camp Davis."
The Daily plans on publishing reg-
ular radio-bulletins from the camp,
providing the camp reporter sees this
story. Messages are being handled at
the other end by Prof. Edward Young,
who is in charge of radio operations
at the camp.

Cancel Johnson's
California Speech
BERKELEY, Cal., July 16.- (P) --
Following refusal of Berkeley police
to give him protection, University
authorities announced today the can-
cellation of a meeting which Gen.
Hugh S. Johnson, NRA administrator,
was to have addrdssed tomorrow.
The officials gave no reason for the
cancellation but it followed shortly
after the police department's refusal
to assign men to protect the Federal
administrator to and from the cam-
pus where he was to speak on "Busi-
ness and Government."

-Associated Press Photo
Mrs. Isabel Dodge Sloane's Cavalcade became the leading money-
winning thoroughbred of 1934 by winning the $35,000 added Arlington
Classic at Chicago. He covered the mile and a quarter in 2:02.8, a new
track record. Here's the finish, with Cavalcade four lengths ahead of
Discovery.
t J)
Dull-Normal Student' Discussed
B Dr. Schorling At Conference

The "dull-normal student" whose
lack of progress bothers child and
parent, and who loses self-confidence
by failing to keep step with his more
able classmates, may learn things
very well - even in such subjects as,
mathematics -if his studies are or-
ganized for him in the right way. This
conclusion by Prof. Raleigh Schorling
of the School of Education is the re-
sult of research on dull-normal stu-.
dents in mathematics classes.
Speaking yesterday in the 4 o'clock
lecture series of the School of Edu-
cation, Professor Schorling discussed
the result of the investigation which
he directed, and proposed seven
methods of approach toward raising
the work of the low-ability student.
A sample unit of specially planned
work which has been taught by eight
teachers to 414 dull pupils in Flint
and Detroit was presented by Profes-
sor Schorling. Careful teaching re-;
sulted in these dull-normal pupils
making an excellent showing. As a'
group they did far better than aver-
age pupils on the same tasks and with
the same teacher.
The chief trouble of the dull-nor-
mal student is in the mechanics of
reading and understanding what he
reads, Professor Schorling stated. The
dull eighth grader may have a read-
ing ability no greater than that of a
fourth- or fifth-grade normal pupil.
Indeed, he declared, it is not uncom-
mon to find pupils in the eighth and
ninth grades who can read only at a
second- or third-grade level.
Out of 137 dull-normal pupils in
one seventh-grade group Professor
Schorling found only three pupils who
were readers with eighth-grade abil-
ity and six with seventh-grade abil-
ity. In brief, there were only nine
children who read as well as one
would expect them to read. Of the'
rest, 13 read at a sixth-grade level,
71 were fifth-grade readers, 38 were
fourth-grade readers, five were at
the third-grade level, and one had
only second-grade ability.
This situation calls for a recogni-
tion of the special psychology of the
low-ability student. Professor Schor-
ling suggested several ways of ap-
proach which the teacher and parent
should understand. "Recognize that
the dull pupil has a low reading abil-
ity. Arrange work so that he will
;live through' the experiences he is to

learn, rather than depending on oral
or written instructions alone.
"The dull-normal student is men-
tally immature; delay new tasks as
long as possible. Do not divide his
work into conventional grades; he
will not be ready for advancement
along with the normal child. The
dull pupil is not lazy, but often is an
earnest worker.
Give him a short, definite goal
which he can see and he will not
work aimlessly. Use visual aids,
graphs, diagrams, and models. Many
dull pupils are 'handy' at models.
Still Ahead - Just
WASHINGTON

(Continued from Page 1)
Roosevelt appeared to be an interna-
tionalist when he called the World
Economic Conference in 1932. How-
ever, stated Professor Watkins, his re-'
fusal to talk about stabilization of an
international dollar and the establish-
ment of the NRA, "with its national-
istic program of recovery," evidence
a change in the President's stand.
Professor Watkins, however,, spoke
of a second change since that time
in which he believes there has been a'
shifting of emphasis back toward the
international aspect. "In reality," he
said, "we are now on an international!
standard with a stabilized dollar, and
recent tariff negotiations look toward
internationalism."
"I am glad, to see the Administra-
tion turning from the narrow nation-
alism which I was afraid last year
we were embracing."
The act of revaluing the dollar,
according to Professor Watkins, "has
really put us back on the gold stand-
ard because there is now a relatively.
free movement of gold." Further, it
has undervalued the dollar, in respect
to foreign currency, he stated. This
undervaluation, he said, gives us an
export stimulus, only, however, where'
competitive raising of obstacles such
as tariffs and embargoes are not in
evidence.
Money Supply Increased
Revalutation has increased the na-
tion's money supply, he commented
further, and this has given the banks
a larger reserve. "The undervalued
dollar," he said, "has served as a mag-
net in attracting foreign gold to our
shores. Thus we have a large amount
of credit available now in reserve."
"It is evident," continued Professor
Watkins, "that revaluation has not
given the price rise which the Presi-
dent expected from Professor War-
ren's diagrams. It is impossible to say
now, however, whether or not the
President contemplates further ma-
nipulation of the content of the dol-
lar."
In commenting on silver, the
speaker said that we have not in
any sense returned to bimetallism.
What we have done, he explained
is to adopt two purchase measures
providing for the acquisition of new-
ly-mined silver.
Silver Overemphasized
The reasons which Professor Wat-
kins said have been offered to sub-
stantiate the government's plan of,
buying a billion dollars worth of
silver were (1) an increased volume
of bank reserves, (2) tendency to re-
duce the value of the dollar as against
Far Eastern currency, and (3) as a
means of helping to redistribute the
gold holdings of the world.
"The entire silver question, inso-
far as its economic bearing on the
nation is concerned," said Professor
Watkins, "has been exaggerated and
overrun-with politics."
The situation in regard to credit,
Professor Watkins declared, is among
the most crucial of all. Two real dan-
gers confront the Administration, he
said, which must be ironed out. There
is 'first, the danger of a budgetary
expansion, such as Germany experi-
enced during the war, he explained,
and secondly, the danger of surplus
reserves leading to credit expansion
which may get beyond control.
ENTERTAIN SOUTHERNERS
The administrative officers of the
School of Education are sponsoring
a tea for Southern Club members, to
be held at 4:30 p.m. today in the li-
brary of the Elementary School.
Qualifications for the club limit the
membership to persons of southern
background who are interested in ed-
ucation.

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

-Associated Press Photo
Rumors that Michael Cardinal
Faulhaber, archbishop of Munich,
was under detention by Nazis could
not be verified. He has been a severe
critic of Nozi policy.
NRA Announces Cut
In Lumber Prices
WASHINGTON, July 16-()-Re-
ductions of 8 to 10 per cent in the
price of all lumber products ordinarily
used in house construction was an-
nounced today by NRA.
The reductions were made by the
Lumber and Timber Products Code
Authority and approved by Hugh S.
Johnson. Taken together with the
recent price cut by retail lumber deal-
ers, NRA officials said, today's order
would mean slashes of 14 to 15 per
cent in prices to the consumer.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISINC
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance--Ilc per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
Minimum three lines per insertion.
days from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines dally, one
month .......... %.............. c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 nonths...8c
2 lines daily, college year ... 7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year ..7c
100 lines used as desired ....9c
300 lines used as desired . ...c
1,000 lines used as desired . .. .7
2,000 lines used as desired ...6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch'
of 71 point Ionic type, upper and. lower
case. Add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10e per line to above rates
for bold face capital letters.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten
more insertions.
LAUNDRY
PERSONAL LAUNDRY service. We
take individual interest in the laun-

dry problems of our customers.
Girls' silks, wools and fine fabrics
guaranteed. Men's shirts our spe-
cialty. Call for and deliver. Phone
5594. 607 E. Hoover. 3x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1c
WANTED
SCIENCE INSTRUCTOR wants fall
position. B.A., Iowa Univ.,- 1930;
M.S., Univ. Mich., 1935; 57 hours
chem., 18 hours physics: Four years
successful, H. S. teaching. Salary
Open. Write Box 4A, Mich. Daily.
28
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 2x
FOR RENT
FURNISHED APARTMENT and
large double room, shower bath.
Continuous hot water. Dial 8544.
422 E. Washington. 37
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: PLAIN Sigma Chi pin. Finder
return to R. T. Gray. Phone 2-3610.

i

J

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AB
Schulte, cf .....4
Myer, 2b.......6
Manush, if .....6
Trais, 3b ......5
Cronin, ss ......4
Harris, rf ......4
Kress, lb .......4
Sewell, c ......4
Crowder, p .....2
Burke, p... ..1
McColl, p ......1

R
2
0
0
1
1
1
2
2
0
1
0

H'
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
0
1
0

TB PO A
4 2 0
4 1 3
1 '3 0
1 0 1
2 2 2
1 3 0
4 11 0
6 6 0
0 0 1
3 0 1
0 0 0
26 27 8

Totals . .. .41 14 13

DETROIT

AB
Fox, rf.........6
White, m .......4
Goslin,'lf .......5
Gehringer, 2b ...4
Rogell, ss ......3
Greenberg, lb ..4
Cochrane, c ....4
*Walker .......1
Hayworth, c ... .1
Owen, 3b .......4
Hamlin, p ......2
Auker, p .......0
Marberry, p ... .0
**Rowe ........1
Sorrell, p .......0
***Schuble .....1

R
0
0
2
1
1
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8

H TB PO
1 2 2
0 02
2 4 2
2 4 1
0 0 3
2 5 13
2 2 2
0 o a
1 1 2
3 4 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0l 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
13 22 2?7

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31

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Totals ....

39

*Batted for Cochrane in seventh.
**Batted for Marberry in seventh.
***Batted for Sorrell in ninth.
Washington........100 004 500-10
Detroit "...........100 014 101- 8

11'

Mi:

DETROIT, July 16.- Miss Jdan
Kyer, the straight-hitting Barton
Hills golfer, gave new evidence that
she is one of the foremost young play-
ers in Michigan when she captured
medal honors for the second straight
year Monday in the women's State
tournament at Orchard Lake. She
carded an 80, one under women's par,
not only leading her nearest rivals by
five strokes but setting a women's
competitive course record.
Tied at 85 for second place were
Mrs. Stewart Hanley, a three-time
champion, and Miss Margaret Rus-
sell, another promising young shooter
from Red Run. Miss Hope Seignious,
fifteen-year-old Birch Hill star, be-
came one of the youngest qualifiers
in the tournament's history when she
shared fourth place with Mrs. Charl-
ton L. Thompson, of Meadowbrook,
at 86.

r

saman

0

7

STATIONERY

TRUiSTWORTHY/

Our Complete Stock features the best of Crane and Eaton papers, as well
as many others of every price and quality. This month's specials include
100 sheets and 100 envelopes of Deckle Edge Vellum, printed attractively
with monogram, or name and address for only 1.00.

This is an

[HNe w spap e r

WAHR IS

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

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Ameans Truth told interestingly

316 STATE STREET

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