100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 15, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 15, 1934

of & A,4:10 "^Tl'Y!

°'I

PAETOR 1' SMT1CH t 1 'A Nf Draaa~I aSNAJUY1,13

Student Health
For Year Good,
ReportShows
Only Two Natural Deaths
Occur During Regular
Session Of School
The University Health Service re-
port for the regular session, released
yesterday, shows that student health
during the past year was good, conta-
gious diseases offering little trouble,
and pneumonia being the only dis-
ease which was unusual in frequency
of occurrence.
The use of the department has
continued to increase, the report
shows, unttl an average of 11 and
one-half calls were -made per student
enrolled, and 94 per cent of the stu-
dents received attention during the
school year.
Sixteen per cent of the students en-
rolled had their eyes tested for glasses
and 55 per cent underwent complete
physical examinations.
Two Natural Deaths
Only two deaths from physical ill-
ness occurred, one of which was from
a chronic heart disease known to
have been hazardous before the stu-
dent was admitted to the University.
Most remarkable of all figures in
the report is the comparison of deaths
by suicide over a three-year period.
There were three deaths by suicide in
the University during 1933-34, while
in the two years previous there were
no suicides.
Dispensary calls for the period of
1933-34 were estimated at 84,933,
whereas for the same period the year
before the figure was 83,231. The
figure for 1931-32 was even lower with
81,981 dispensary calls reported.
Many Mental Hygiene Calls
In lieu of the three suicides last
year an interesting set of figures in
the report are those totals of mental
hygiene patients for a three-year
period. For 1933-34 there were 736
such cases reported. In 1932-33 there
were only 640, and in 1931-32 there
was an even smaller number with
only 600 mental hygiene patients.
1933-34 was evidently a median
year for the number of prescriptions
filled from the Health Service, be-
cause this year there were 11,282!
prescriptions filled, while in 1932-
33 there were 13,562, and the low year
was 1931-32 with only 9,225.
The number of sensitization pa-
ti nts tested also noticeably increased
during the past year, with 625 being
tested. In 1932-33 529 were tested and
in 1931-32 581 were tested. This serv-
ice is under the direction of Dr.
)luenaventura Jiminez at the Health
Service.
4,006 Health Exams
There were 4,006 health examina-
tions last year in comparison to 3,-
933 during 1932-33.
.On the list of diagnoses several
were selected for comparisons, includ-
ing acute appendicitis, contagious
diseases, and pneumonia.
The number of acute appendicitis
cases reported remained compara-
tively stable with 72 reported last
year, 74 in 1932-33, and 72 in 1931-
32.
The number of contagious diseases
showed a remarkable decrease over
last year's figures. 37 were reported
last year, whereas in 1932-33 there
Were 161 contagious diseases cases.
Pneumonia showed a definite in-
crease with 62 cases reported last year,
in comparison to 31 and 48 for the
two preceding years.
Tiger Track Squad
Arrives InEngland
OXFORD, England, July 14. - (VP)

--- The combined Cornell-Princeton
track team, headed by Bill Bonthron,
Tigers' mile and 1,500 meter star, ar-
rived here Friday for a meet with Ox-
ford and Cambridge July 21 and with-
in an hour was warming up on the
university track.
All reported fit after .the ocean
voyage and Bonthron reeled off a
couple of fast laps. He will leave
tomorrow with Asa Bushnell, grad-
uate manager of athletics at Prince-
ton, and several other athletes, to
watch Jack Lovelock, British mile
star who won a mile against Bonthron
in 4:07.6 at Princeton last year, com-
pete in a meet at White City.
QUADRUPLETS "DOING WELL"
SAC CITY, Ia.,° July 14. - (R) -
The Wycoff quadruplets, five weeks
old today, are "hale and hearty."
Their physician, Dr. G. H. Swearin-
gen, proudly declared the quartet to
be "doing Just as well as any babies
could be expected to do under the
circumstances."
"There is no reason why they
should not continue ,to thrive," he
stated.

Society Members Seek Cooling Breezes

NRA To Face
Major Trials
Of Its Power
Price-Publishing Question
Now Before Commission
For Decision
WASHINGTON, July 14.-- (o) -
NRA is facing and apparently court-
ing two major tests of its power to
grant industry the right to do things
hitherto regarded as forbidden or
dangerous.
The first two cases from NRA to
come before the trade commission
deal with the right of a code author-
ity to require its members to publish
prices, and to prevent the addition of
extra productive capacity.
Price filing has been attacked as
permitting dominant members of an
industry to require smaller members
to stick to certain prices. Production
capacity control has been similarly
assailed on the ground it stops smaller
members from getting their fair share
of production.
Adherents of the plans, however,
argue they serve primarily to pro-
mote price stability and to prevent
excessive production.
At any rate some 150 NRA codes
require price filing in some form or
another, and an adverse decision by
the trade commission might throw
all of these codes into a temporary
snarl, although of course, the decision1
could and is expected to be appealed
to the supreme court.
Similarly, many codes permit code
authorities to regulate production ca-
pacity by stating the number of ma-
chine hours which may be operated,
by preventing the construction of new
machinery, and in other ways. Some
code industries have hailed these de-
vices as having saved them from ex-
cessive surpluses.
Opinion, however, is by no means
unanimous even in industry, and
there is argument among different in-
terests - even within the same indus-
tries - for and against price and pro-
duction control.

First Roosevelt Cabinet Baby On Display

-Associatea ress rnoto
With the mercury almost knocking the top out of thermometers,
eastern society folk flocked to the beaches hunting cooling breezes.
Mary L. Peck (left) and Mrs. Arthur T. Williams, New York socialites,
are show4 on Long Island.
Hay Fever, Asthma Proved To
Be Inherited Family Weaknesses

Hay fever, asthma, eczema, food
idiosyncrasy, and similar minor dis-1
eases which are caused by excessive
sensitivity to certain pollens, dusts,
foods, or other common substances,1
have been found to be inherited fam-E
ily weaknesses in 33 per cent of 7,000f
students studied by the University of1
Michigan Health Service. Probably
54 per cent of all persons have a per-
sonal or family history of "sensitiza-
tion diseases," the survey also showed.'
Since 1930, complete medical his-
tories of 7,000 students entering the
University have been registered and
checked for accuracy by parents of
the students, according to Dr. Buena-
ventura Jimenez, writing in the Mich-'
igan Medical Society Journal.
It was found that 12 per cent of'
these students had previously had
hay fever, rose. fever, asthmaror ec-
zema. A second group, 22 per cent,
reported having had urticaria, gas-
trointestinal upsets, food idiosyncra-
sy, frequent "colds" and headaches
of the type usually caused by sensi-
tization to some substance or food.
A third group, 19 per cent, reported
themselves so far free from such
annoyances, but with a history of
Washke's Golfers
Win Second Match
Prof. Paul Washke's golf team re-
peated its previous win over a team
captained by Prof. Paul Diamond Fri-
day on the University Course. The
two teams are composed of members
of the Men's Education Club.
Prof. Washke's team average for the
18 holes was 96 while Prof. Diamond's
team average was 101.
Wilbur Worley again took low
medal honors, shooting an 89.
The ,next meet between the two
teams will be held Wednesday over
the 18 holes of the University Course.
The meet will begin at 1:30 p.m.

sensitivity among other family mem-
bers.
"Although the Health Service fig-
ures show a prevalence of sensitiza-
tion diseases exceeding all previous
estimates, they are well attested and
emphasize the need of more attention
to these conditions which are usually
regarded as annoyances rather than
diseases," states Dr. Jimenez. This
viewpoint may be justified in youth,
for many of the symptoms are pro-
gressive with age and may eventually
tax the nervous and physical energy
heavily. even though they are very
rarely direct causes of death or ser-
ious illness. Desensitization when-
ever possible during or before col-
lege age is worthwhile health in-
surance."
Anti-War Group
Will Meet At
UnionFriday
The first Summer Session meeting
of the Michigan League Against War
and Militarism will be held at 4:0(
p.m., Monday at the Union. Plans for
a number of lectures, symposia anc
a definite program for the month o:
August will be made at this meet-
ing and all old members, as well
as other interested people have been
invited to attend.
The Michigan League Against Wa:
and Militarism has been active in
crystallizing anti-war sentiment since
its inception last semester. It spon-
sored the Michigan Anti-War Con
ference which was attended by dele-
gates from high schools and colleges
of the lower peninsula. The confer-
ence was held last May.

t
t
r

MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

L
1
r'
r
t

W
DETROIT..........50
New York ...........48
Boston ..............43
Cleveland ............40
Washington .........40
St. Louis .............32
Philadelphia .........30
Chicago............27

L
30
29
36
37
40
40
47
51

Pct.
.625
.623
.544
.519
.500
.444
.390
.346

Yesterday's Results
Detroit 12, New York 11.
St. Louis 8, Boston 7.
Cleveland 2, Washington 0.
Chicago 10, Philadelphia 5.
Games Today
New York at Detroit.
Boston at St. Louis (2).
Washington at Cleveland (2).
Philadelphia at Chicago.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L
New York..........51 30
Chicago............50 31
St. Louis...........44 34
Pittsburgh ..........40 36
Boston.............40 41
Brooklyn ............34 47
Philadelphia .........34 48
Cincinnati ...........26 52
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 11, New York 7.

Pct
.63a
.61'1
.56'
.52(
.494
.42(
.41
.33

.,
3
9.
6
4
0
5
3
?.

W
wi
W
T
T
for
T
Geh
Role
Salt
Rut
Byrd
Conl
Ch
Dic
Cro
Hef:
Gom
Des
Van
Gri
Fox
Wal
Gos
Ge
Rog
Gre
Ow
Hai
coc
Sor.
Au(
Ho
Ma:
*W*
*R
***
*
**
Ne
Det
3.

I

f
'c
v
r.
p
6
D
0
h
e
h
d
V
a,
G
s
e
b
i
r
d
P
d
u
p
a
h
0
C
I
G
0
R
b
I

(Continued from Page 1)
hen Grimes went to the
the Yanks, and retired
IGER-YANKEE BOX SCC
NEW YORK
A R H P
rig,ss........1 0 1C
fe, ss.........2 2 24
;gaver, lb .....5 1 1f
h, f .. .. ..5 1 1 l
d, f..........0 0 0
bs, cf ........5 1 1
ppman, rf......2 2 0
key, c ........5 2 3
setti, 3b ........4 1 3 ]
fner, 2b ........5 0 0
nez, p .........3 1 1
hong, p .......0 0 0
Atta, p ......1 0 0
mes, p ........0 0 0
Totals .......39 11 14 2

2 4
0 0
a 0
0 1
0 0
6 9

1
0
0
0
0
2

CLAS SIFTED DIRECTORY

1 ,___

DETROI
A
, rf ....... ...5
ker, cf ........6
lin, if ........5
ringer, 2b .....5
ell, ss .........4
enberg, lb .....5
en, 3b .........4
yworth, c ......1
Irane, c......3
el, p ........0
ier, p.........2
sett, p........0
rberry, p......1
hite ...........1
owe ..........1
Clif ton ........0

IT
IR
3
1
2
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
2
0
w1

m Walker on a pop foul to Red Rolfe
Gerald )lehind third. Goose Goslin, he of the
- ,d .large proboscis, met one of Grimes
ORE I choice offerings and sent it deep into
rightfield for two bases, and Rogel
PO A E and Clifton scored with the tying
0 0 0 runs.
5 4 0 Charlie Gehringer, next to face
9 0 0 Grimes, was given an intentional pass
1 0 0 bringing up Billy Rogell, but Roge]l
1 0 0 crossed up his aged mound foe ani
2 0 0 singled to left, driving Goslin hom
2 0 1 with the winning counter, and ending
3 0 0 a real old-fashioned Detroit-Ne
1 0 0 York slugfest.
A

ti

Experts Insist
Major War Is
Unlikely Now
(Continued from Page 1)
the Japanese program in the Far
East would result in the creation of a
new Manchurian Empire with Peiping
as the capital. That would mean the
acquisition of further territory, of
course. Pu-Yi would continue in the
position he now occupies in Manchu-
quo."
War is out of the question partly
because there is noapeople that has
the money to fight a war, Mr.' Finch
believes, partly because there are still
too many people living who saw or
understood the horror of the last
war.
"Ordinarily, any one asked a year
ago would have predicted war within
a year," Prof. Wilson declares. "Now
the year is gone and adjustments
have been made that will put war
off longer.
"The Far East isn't America and it
isn't Europe. It's way of thinking is
different. At the same time Japan to-
day is following a well-thought-out
policy, a policy based "on intelli-
gent comprehension and not-at all on
chance. She knew what she was doing
when she went into Manchuria. She
knows just how far she can go in
taking every step in her program.
What that program may be cannot
be definitely determined but it will be
completed without Japan at any time
going so far as to invite real danger
of major warfare.
"The provisions of the Washington
e Conference make Japan relatively
' more secure. They prevent the United
o States from fortifying its possessions
1 in the Far East in a manner that
g might be construed as dangerous to
Japan, as well as limiting the number
e and tonnage of ships. Considering
s, that the United States may not for-
11 tify, its attacking power is limited
A to its fighting strength and the ability,
e to concentrate that strength. Its abil-
ig ity to concentrate is limited to the
w speed of its slowest fleet units, the
aircraf carriers."

-Associated Press Photo
Marcus, three-weeks-old son of Assistant Secretary of War Harry
oodring, former governor of Kansas, and Mrs. Woodring, is shown
th his proud parents at their summer home near Washington. Mrs.
oodring is the daughter of Senator Marcus Coolidge of Massachusetts
.gers Retvain Top Position
With Victory Over Yankees

H
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0

PO
2
2
3
4
2
2
2,
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

A
0
0
0
2
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance-11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
Minimum three lines per insertion.
days from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month..................8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months .c8
2 lines daily, college year .. .7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year .. 7c
100 lines used as desired ....9c
300 lines used as desired ....8c
1,000 lines used as desired . .. 7c
2,000 lines used as desired .. .6
The above rates are per reading line,
based oil eight reading lines per inch
of 72 point ionic type, upper and lower
case. Add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10c per line to above rates
for bold face cap~ital letters.
Telephone Rate--] 5c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
101;1 discount if paid within ten
more insertions.

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lxa
WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 2x
FOR RENT
FURNISHED APARTMENT and
large double room, shower bath.
Continuoushot water., Dial 8544.
422 E. Washington.37
LOST AND FOUND
LOST : PLAIN Sigma Chi pin. Finder
return to R. T. Gray. Phone 2-3610.
LOST: Red Cavan. No reward for
his return. Call Dan Mahoney.
2-3205. 40
IRead The Clossifieds

A

Totals .......43 12 20 27 7 1
"White batted for Auker in 6th.
*Rowe batted for Marberry in 9th.
*Clifton ran for Rowe in 9th.
w York .....402 300 200-11 14 21
roit .......001 313 004-12 20 1

I

mill

.. ...

... . . r,

Pittsburgh 4, Boston 3 (12 innings)
Brooklyn 10, St. Louis 2.
Philadelphia 18-5,' Cincinnati 0-4.
Games Today
Chicago at New York.
St. Louis at Brooklyn.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia.
Pittsburgh at Boston (2).

'You'll Be Sorry
If you do not take advantage of unusual
values offered on our entire $12,000 stock
MEN'S &r WOMEN'S HI-GRADE SHOES

STATIONERYt
Our Complete Stock features the best of Crane and Eaton papers, as well
as many others of every price and quality. This month's specials-include
100 sheets and 10 0 envelopes of Deckle Edge Vellum, printed attractively
with monogram, or name and address for only 1.00.
WAHR S I UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE
316 STATE STREET

-S

Florsheim Shoes
All new styles III Broken Lot

is

All Other Makes
cut to
$3.88 $4.88 $5.88
Former Prices $5.00 to $9.00

Now
$7.85

Now
$5.85

CAMPUS BOOTERY

304 So.
State St.

I

V

-

good service-excellent food- reasonable pri

ces

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan