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July 14, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-14

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THE MVLICHJiGAN,DAILY

t Discusses

Presidential Ship And Route Of His Cruise. To Hawaii

u

Attainments Of
Law Conference
Third Year Of Meetings
For International Law
Professors
Illustrates Methods

Instructors In The Sessioi
Give Lectures And Leas
Seminar Discussion
The purposes and accomplish
ments of the Conference on Inter
national Law now convening at th
Law School were explained by Dr
James Brown Scott, chairman, in a;
interview yesterday..
Consisting of some 35 or 40 mer
and women teachers of internationa
law and international relations a
various institutions in the Unite
States, this year's meeting "is a con
tinuation of a venture started thre
years ago with a summer meetin
here at the invitation of the Carne
gie Endowment for Internationa
Peace," Dr. Scott stated.
The topics being considered at th
sesion this summer are Internationa
Law, a study of the Classics in th
subject, Before and After Grotius, A
Interpretation of Treaties; the Law o
Territorial Waters, the W r i t t er
Sources of International Law, and
International Arbitration.. But in ad
dition to these topics, one of th
purposes of the conference is an ex
position of the methods of teachin
international law by five experience
professors of the subject from a
many institutions.
Study Instruction Methods
By this means the teachers hav
the opportunity to study the method
of instruction not only in one insti
tution, as the University of Michi
gan, but in several institutions. Th
course as it is presented is intended
not only to teach international law
but to illustrate teaching by exam
ple. Each of ,the five instructor
gives at least one public lecture on
some phase of the subject allowing
the students to compare their meth
ods of presentation..
In these lectures the speakers, Dr
Scott explains, are striving to give an
address of a popular kind in the hop
of reaching and instructing without
tiring. Part of the instruction of the
conference lies in the example pro-
vided by the instructors in the prepa-
ration and delivery of these talks.
The method of instruction on the
part of each, man is perhaps uncon-
scious, but the students, themselves
teachers, are able to weigh the meth-
ods as representative of five profes-
sors chosen from five'accredited in-
stitutions.

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-Asgoclated Press Photo
The cruiser Houston has been specially fitted and equipped for President Roosevelt's'combination good will
and holiday, cruise to Hawaii. Besides making a survey of the nation's outlying possessions, he will call on
President Enrique Olaya Herrera at Cartagena, Columbia, and plans to go ashore several times at Panama.
After his Hawaiian visit, Mr. Roosevelt will return to the west coast for an overland trip by rail back' to the
capital. He is expected to visit the Booneville project on the Columbia river Wlear Po tlanid, Ore.

Yanis Regain
Lead; Defeat'
Detroit 4 To 2

Machine Guns Guard San Francisco Buildings

Also Give Seminars
In addition to the lectures, each of
the instructors in the five-week tern
offers two seminars to the entire
group of visiting teachers. Each in-
structor, in these seminars, states thE
nature of the question in relation tC
his observation of allied subjects. The
seminars are open to discussion of
all the members of the group.Here
too is an example of five different
types of seminar or round-table dis-
cussion. Each instructor differs ir
his way of teaching and the gdests,
coming from different colleges anc
universities, also vary, with the re-
sult that it is a forum, not only of
different views of the subject under
discussion, but of various methods of
conducting such a discussion.
"Three years ago, the summer con-
ference was an experiment," Dr. Scott
said. "Last year' it was a going con-
cern, and this year it is permanently
established here. In the opinion of
the men and women attending this
summer the conference is of great
value."
"Most Beautiful Building"
The classroom for the conference is
in Hutchins Hall, described by Dr.
Scott as the latest link in the Univer-
sity and the most beautiful university
building in the world. The visiting
guests have full advantage of the
University, access to the General Li-
-brary with the privilege of drawing
books and the same privilege in the
Legal Research Library.
Dr. Scott himself is very well known
in the field of international law. Ac-
cording to Dr. Lewis C. Cassidy, a stu-
dent at the conference from the Uni-
versity of Washington and possessor
of the'J.D. degree from Harvard Law
School, Dr. Scott has been awarded
five honorary degrees; from the uni-
versities of Michigan, Paris, Cam-
bridge, Salamanca, and San Marco-
the oldest university in the western
hemisphere. He has been a represen-
tative of the United States at all her
conferences from the second Hague
Conference to the Pan-American
Conference in Havana in 1929.
Dr. Scott is secretary and a trustee
of the Carnegie Endowment for In-
ternational Peace, president of the
American Society of International
Law, and past president of the Insti-
tute of Law - the only American ever
to achieve this distinction. He is a
commander of the French Legion of
Honor, was Major in Judge-Advocate'
in the World War, and served in the
Spanish-American War first in the
second division of the California Vol-
uinteers and later in the i eventrA~,-fa~

Babe Ruth Clouts 700th
e Home Run To Give New
N York Winning Margin
s (Continued from Page 1)
n A baffling change of pace mixed
g with a sizzling fast ball kept the
- Tigers guessing all afternoon, and
only Hank Greenberg was able to con-
nect successfully.
Greenberg hit the offerings of the
e Yankee ace for two hits, both for
t extra bases. His first, a double in the
e second inning, failed to contribute tc
the scoring, and he was left stranded
_ on third after Cochrane had singlec
but Owen and Bridges both failed tc
advance them.
In the eighth, however, after Billy
Rogell had - been safe on a fielder's
choice which forced Gehringer at
second when the Fowlerville Flash
came through with his lone hit of
the day, Greenberg hit one of Ruff-
ing's offerings off the centerfield wall
f and reached third standing up, to
score Rogell.
The Tigers put over their first run
in the fourth after Jo Jo White had
walked and had gone to third on a
double by Goslin to score on an out-
field fly by Gehringer.
Although Ruffing allowed but six
hits, he was in frequent trouble, and
found himself with a 3 and two count
on the batter many times in the
. early innings. He walked four men
and fanned three.
Bridges started out strong, but
Ruth's homer in the third evidently
unnerved him, for the Yankees began
to get at his offerings frequently,
and even his control failed to func-
tion ,for he walked four, all in the
late innings. He struck out eight.
The Tigers' big trouble was failure
to come through in the pinches, eight
finding themselves stranded on the
basepaths, and all were ready to
score.
With Greenberg on third following
his triple in the ninth Manager Coch-
rane became irked by a decision of
Umpire Donnelly's which retired the
Tiger leader on strikes and ended a
potential rally.
Intermittent showers following the
fourth inning failed to mar the play.
The two teams will meet tomorrow
for the third in the crucial four-
game series. Manager Cochrane has
nominated Victor Sorrell to go against
the Yankees, and Vernon Gomez will
attempt to retain first place for Rup-
pert's Riflemen.
The box score:
NEW YORK

Prize-Fighter
Leaves Wife To
Enter Movies
Astor Widow, Fiermonte
Separate After A Brief
Marriage Career
NEW YORK, July 12. - John Ja-
cob Astor's middle-aged widow and
the young Italian welterweight prize-
fighter she married last December
are going traveling -in different di-
rections.
Society and humbler circles, which
buzzed with ° gossip when it was
learned she was going alone to Paris,
where the French divorce mills grind
apart many an American marriage,
nodded knowingly today when her
husband, Enoz Fiermonte, former
Flint, Mich., boxer, announced he
was going to quit the fight racket to
become a film actor in Hollywood.
"You'll have to ask her," Fier-
monteureplied laconically when asked
whether his wife approved his con-
templated Hollywood venture. "I'm
on my way."
It has been two weeks since the
Adonis-like figure of the boxer, who
is 26 years old and was married and
divorced before he met his latest
bride, has been seen on the sands of
West Hampton, where Mrs. Fier-
monte, 40. is staying.
She has been silent about the pur-
pose of her Paris voyage.
Her first husband, Astor, died a he-
ro's death when the Titanic sunk af-
ter striking an iceberg in the Atlantic
in 1912. Before he drowned, he saw
her placed safely in a lifeboat.
Renouncing the fortune he left her
on condition that she remain single,
Mrs. Astor in 1916 married William
K. Dick, a childhood friend and a
mere millionaire (Astor's estate was
valued at $87,000,000). She divorced
him last July 21 in Minden, Nev., two
months before Fiermonte divorced
his first wife in Reno.
By EDWARD J.'NEIL
(Associated Press Staff Writer)
The relief of young Enzo Fiermonte
in getting out of society and back into
the prize fight business doesn't argue
very well for a career that runs from
the social halls of Southampton and
Newport in the summer to Palm
Beach in the winter and back again.
Fiermonte is just 26 years old, and
last November his marriage to the
widow of John Jacob Astor, who died
a hero on the sinking Titanic, created
a tremendous sensation in what was
practically the stratosphere of socie-
ty. Enzo, a fair pugilist and a very
handsome physical specimen, first
met the former Mrs. Astor, who was
then also' the former Mrs. William
Dick, while teaching John Jacob As-
tor, Jr., how to take care of himself
with his fists if he ever found the
need in rough company.
One thing led to another, romance
developed, and finally, while the for-
mer Mrs. Astor was recovering in a
New York hospital from a broken
arm and shoulder, they were mar-
ried. Fiermonte previously had di-
vorced his wife in Italy.
Life became a gay round of cock-
tail parties, teas and social enter-
tainments. Now Enzo is back in the
fight business, and he looks tre-
mendously relieved. His every ac-
tion, and some of his words, indicate
that if he never gets back in that
squirrel cage again it will be soon
enough. Prize fighting, by compari-
son, is a pleasure.
The New York State Athletic com-
mission has decided that Enzo isn't
fit to fight Maxie Rosenbloom for the
1 i g h t - heavyweight championship,
which should make Enzo a prohibitive
favorite to win the title. The com-

mission, represented by Bill Brown,
said the same thing about Max Baer
and look what happened.
Brown, for all the jibes that came
his way afterward, was just about

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Vage 2)
The following persons please 're-
port to the Office of the Summer Ses-
sion, 1213 Angell Hall, immediately:
Leonore Hohl
Rachel Uhvits
Martin, Swen
M. Z. Windham
H. G. Barker
J. D. Ferdman
Lester Morey
E. J. Walters
S. Edward Marder
Louise A. Haekler
H. M. Pollard
S. A. Wahid
E. S. Breaver, Jr.
L. H. Rosenberg-
.J..B.San ord x.n .,

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ENZO FIERMONTE
90 per cent right in his evaluation of
Baer's condition, regardless of the
outcome of the Carnera match. A
well trained fighter with Baer's wal-
lop would have stowed Carnera away
in a round.
But setting that matter aside, there
is no reason why the commission
shouldn't permit Fiermonte to fight
Rosenbloom.

-Associated Press Photo
One of the several machine gun nests set up along San Francisco's
strike-torn waterfront is shown here, ready for any emergency. Machine
guns also were rushed to various downtown San Francisco buildings to
prepare for the possibility of a general strike.
Prof. Carver's Course In Flying
Is Popular For Hot Summer Days

By DONALD R. BIRD
To the man who spends Sunday
afternoon wishing he had a car and a
swim, here is a welcome diversion.
Out at the city airport on State Street
every week Prof. A. C. Carver of the
mathematics department is teaching
students how to pilot airplanes. Prob-
ably there are very few students who
haven't at some time wanted to be
able to run one of these new-fangled
machines. Here's a chance.
Both men and women who have
signed up with Professor Carver find
some time during the week to sneak
out to the field via special taxi and
fly for two or three hours. All but a
few of the students are allowed to
handle the controls, and some of them
have already done a bit of solo fly-
ing.
Al Lee, son of Professor Lee, is the
youngest pilot in Ann Arbor and has
over two hours soloing to his credit
now. Don Baldwin and Fred Hunt,
local students, are spending a lot of1
time out there trying to master three<
point landings and the rest of the
art of keeping the neck whole.
Where- T-o Got
Morning
8:00 - Excursion No. 5 - The Gen-x
eral Motors Proving Ground and La-E
boratories at Milford. Visit to thet
Weather Station. Meet on Angell HallI
steps.
Afternoon
2:00 - Michigan Theatre, "Privatef
Scandal' 'with Phillip Holmes.
2:00-Majestic Theatre, "Spring-
time for Henry" with Otto Kruger and
Nancy Carrol.I
2:00 - Wuerth Theatre, two fea-r
tures, "The Search for Beauty" withl
Buster Crabbe and "Dark Hazard"c
with Edward G. Robinson.a
4:00 - Same features at the three
theatres.
EveningV
7:00 -Same features at the three
theatres._
8:30 -"Both Your Houses" by the
Michigan Repertory Players, Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.j
9:00 -Social evening, Michigan
Tpri Rii~n

Bob Auburn, a summer session man,
is in Pontiac now, practicing spot
landings for the amateur division of
the air meet to be held there tomor-
row. He may be the first of a long
line of future University representa-
tives in the big air meets. This will
be the acid test of Professor Carver's
instruction, too.
Let it be here recorded that the
men do not hold forth exclusively
at this game. Several faculty and city
women go up every day, and some, so
the pilots say, are better pupils than
the men. Mrs. Laura Mae Brunton
piloted her husband's ship the other
day for the record of being the first
Ann Arbor woman to fly solo here.
Two other woman students are fight-
ing for second honors - a thing their
ancestors would gasp at, were they
living now.
It seems that the port is becoming
something of a replacement of the old
swimming hole on hot days. A trip
through the clouds any day beats a
swim all hollow, and a cool shower
afterwards completes the perfect
afternoon.
Some days it's worth while to just
sit around and listen to the stories
the pilots tell. And at six-thirty every
day the mail from the east is dropped
off. Ann Arbor is one of the few
smaller ports where the big airway
planes land twice a day-from the
east and west - without extra charge
to the postal service. These pilots
really have thrilling experiences to
tell, and it's a good time to be around.
Last week a trio of navy planes
from Detroit dropped in on a cross-
country trip to brush up on dirt land-
ings. At the controls of the leader
was John Nolan, graduated from
Michigan this June. The others were
navy men who are enrolled part-time
in the University this summer. Some
day Michigan may train the army
air corps.
Deaths from all causes in Georgia
were reduced from 1,211.9 per 100,000
population in 1860 to 1,031.1 in 1933.
DLAL7Z/I>n AkI

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for your
BAS EMENT

Luther Purdom
Explains Work
Of Job Bureau
Vocational, Ed ational
Guidance Large Part Of
Function, Director Says
To many, the University Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation exists only to get jobs for
students. But this is only a part of the
bureau's work, it's director T. Luther
Purdom told, an audience at the four
o'clock lecture series of the School of
Education.
The work of the guidance was de-
scribed by Dr. Purdom as covering
"a wide range of work, but may be
divided into main phases: first, the
so-called educational guidance, hav-
ing to do with all types of informa-
tion, both general and specific; sec-
ond, the vocational guidance and per-
sonal adjustment, dealing to a
greater extent with the scientific side
of -guidance and the relation of one's
fitness to the various professions."
Information which the office is called
upon to furnish is upon every imag-
inable situation, he said.
The work in vocational guidance
and personal adjustment is also com-
plicated, Dr. Purdom stated. Tech-
niques used are a certain amount of
testing, frequent interviews, and coun-
selling. He traced the growth in this
department from the small beginning
it had several years ago to the
present time when several hundred
individuals are carefully studied each
year.
Dr. 'Purdom described a case now
pending as an example of the varied
problems which the bureau must
cope with. "A freshman entered the
University with the idea of preparing
for a certain profession. He was
obliged to earn his way, and became
ill. The Health Service found that it
was impossible for him to carry so
heavy a load, and advised him to
carry a light educational load without
any outside work. He was referred
to the Bureau, and it is now con-
sidering his case. That is only a typ-
ical case, although perhaps a 'trifle
more difficult to solve than most, Dr.
Purdom said.

J~ B. Safr uom said.
- - -

PRACTICAL LIGHTING

In lighting your basement, utility is the
first consideration. An adequate supply of
light is essential for the laundry room, the
fruit room, the furnace room, and the
stairway.
For ordinary conditions, the laundry
room should have a ceiling fixture in the
center of the room equipped with a 60 watt
lamp, and two. other ceiling fixtures. The
fixture over the ironing board or ironer,
or under which other work is done, should
have a 60 watt lamp. The fixture over the
wash tubs and washing machine requires
a 1 0 0 watt lamp for proper illumination.

AB R
Combs, cf ......5 1
Saltzgaver, 3b,lb 4 0
Ruth,if ........3 2
Byrd, if .......0 0
Gehrig, lb .....1 0
Rolfe,'ss .......2 0
Chapman, rf ...3 1
Dickey,. c......4 0
Crosetti, ss,3b . .3 0
Heffner, 2b .... 4 0
Ruffing, p ... .4 0

H'
1
0
1
0
1
1
1
2
0

TB PO
1 4
0 7
4 1
0 0
1 1
11
1 0
3 5
1 2
1 6
0 0

A
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
3
0
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Summer
Sweet's
A Nq i POUndI Package
by
29c
Another Summer Favorite
Chocolate, 2 c-
Fruit and Nuts..

II

should be located in the fruit room, the
boiler room, and at the foot of the stairway.
In the basement, especially, recommen-
, dations vary with conditions. For this
reason we suggest that you call upon The
Detroit Edison Company's Home Lighting
Adviser who will test your lighting with
the Sight Meter and will make recommen-
dations for lighting your home properly.
This is part of our service. Merely call the
Detroit Edison office near you41
The-

Ceiling

fixtures with 60 watt lamps

Totals ....33 4 9 13 27 6 0
DETROIT

Fox, rf ...
White, of.
Goslin, if ..

AB
5 !
.....2
4 1

Gehringer, 2b ..4
Rogell, ss......4
Greenberg, lb ..4
Cochrane, c ... .3

R
0
1
0
0
1
0
0

H
0
0
1
1
1
2
1

TB
0
0
2
1
1
5
1

PO
4
2
1
1
2
8
8

A
1
0
0
1
4
0
2

E
01
0
0
0l
0
0
0'

Popular '2-lb Boxes IOc
Cream Kisses
Burnt Peanuts
Butterscotch Pop Corn
Lemon & Lime Drops
Peanut Mallows

JXF/"W31.,3LC V
B FAII 1TY

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