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July 08, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-07-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 8,

THEMICIGA DALYSUNAYJUL_8

Pairings For
Tennis Mat ch
Are Announced

Scenes

Of Activity At University Fresh Air .Camp

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Where To Go |

iI

Men's Singles - Preliminary Round
Aubrey 2-1456 vs. Straiton; Harvey
7142 vs. R.D. Mindlin 8717; Stimson
4151 vs. Kurrelmeier; Overton 2-2102
vs. Weil 4151; Peterson 3248 vs. Cole-
man 2-1817; A. Smith 6464 vs. D.
Sutta 2-2084; Carry 7796 vs. Uchenko
2-3582; Archer 8467 vs. Hoskins 5519;
Meyerson vs. Shoberg 3216; B. Lewis
3266 vs. Walker 4473; Thomas vs.
Guthrie 7136; Thompson 6943 vs. C.
Smith 6282; Morton vs. Wagner, Univ.
392; Szekein 4293 vs. Hoobler 2-1022;
L. Davis 2-1388 vs. W. Sharfman 6220;
P. Jones 6224 vs. Churchill 4655;
Dolph 6251 vs. Wanty 4293; Crawford
2-2155 vs. Breed; Frisinger 8360 vs.
Roper 2-3882.
Men's Singles - First Round
C. S. Lewis vs. Malan 2-2934; Adel-
man 3582 vs. Brandies; J. Edmonds
2-2340 vs. winner Aubrey-Straiton
match; Evans 8652 vs. Walcutt 2-
2354; Whitker 9024 vs. winner Har-
vey-Mindlin match; E. G. Johnston
2-1848 vs. Hilsman 8177; Schneider
3497 vs. winner Stimson-Kurrelmeier
match; B. Sutta 2-2084 vs. winner
Overton-Weil match; H. Kasabach
3201 vs. Kruse 6663; Kayser 2-2.058
vs. winner Peterson-Coleman match;
B. Brown 5382 vs. Winner Smith-Sut-
ta match; Peirsol 3415 vs. winner
Carry-Uchenko match; Bacon 5378 vs.
R. L. Mindlin 8717; Rogers 7282 vs.
winner Archer-Hospins match; Nich-
01o 7017 vs. Brandt; Dorsey 7211 vs.
winner Meyerson-Shoberg match;
Nyswander 5704 vs. Weiner 8624.
Kelly 7282 vs. winner Lewis-Walker
match; Hinks 4293 vs. winner Thom-
as-Guthrie match; Haines 3969 vs.:
winner Thompson - Smith match;
Gregory 5764 vs. Elliott 2-2861; Don-
ker 2-3861 vs. winner Morton-Wag-
ner match; Estavillo 8528 vs. Wolfe
3807; Nisen 2-1817 vs. winner Sze-
kein-Hoobler match; Srigley 6675 vs.
Crowley 5111; Gehring 9483 vs. win-
ner Davis-Sharfman match; Kosola-
poff J765 vs. winner Jones-Churchill
match; Nell vs. winner Dolph-Wanty
match; White, Univ. 416 vs. Winner
Crawford-Breed match; Rieder 4917
vs. R. H. Edmonds 2-2340; Suyat
6739 vs. winner Frisinger-Roper
match; Vorbeck 6746 vs. Angell 8782.
Men's Doubles --Preliminary Round
Engle 5735 and Kruse 6633 vs.
Whitehurst and Thomas; Brown 5382
and White, Univ. 416 vs. Hinks and
Wanty 4293; Kelly and Rogers 7282
vs. Abinojar and Dotimas 2-3314.
Men's Doubles - First Round
Lewis and Mack 4211 vs. Syat and
Nollido 2-3314; Johnson 2-1840 and
Dana vs. winner Engle and Kruse -
Whitehurst and Thomas; Mindlin and
Mindlin 8717 vs. Stallard and Raab;
Whitker 9024 and Frisinger 8360 vs.
'winner Brown and White - Hinks
and Wanty; H. Lewis 3004 and Peirsol
8540 vs. Roper 2-3882 and Weiner 2-
3882.
Gregory and Kasabach 3201 vs.
winner Kelly and Rogers - Abinojar
and Dotimas; Nyswander 5704 and
Haines 3969 vs. Dolph 6251 and Shroth
8802; Srigley 6675 and Agnew vs. Dor-
sey 7211 and Angell 8782.
Mixed Doubles -First Round
Keppel 2-1586 and Lewis vs. Knau
6518 and Walcutt 2-2354; Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Lewis3004 vs. F. Bonisteel
7926 and Frisinger 8360; Mr. and Mrs.
Skinner vs. C. Inglis 7267 and B. Lewis
2-2266; Mr. and Mrs. Bacon 5378 vs.
Davis and Dorsey 7211; Goodrich and
Srigley 6675 vs. Hobart and Mack
4211; Cherington 7252 and Schmeling
vs. Gillen 6931 and Gregory 5764;
Sanders 7392 and Aubrey 2-1456 vs.
Carstens 4922 and Stallard; Alex-
ander 5879 and Angell 8782- bye.
Women's Singles - First Round
Helen Alexander 5879 vs. Betty
Bonisteel 7926; Carol Inglis 7267 vs.
Margot Goodrich 2-2618; Marjorie
Davis 5986 vs. Cherington 7252; Ma-
rion Davis 2-1388 vs. Merida Hobart
2-2707; Catherine Sanders 7392 vs.
May Lewis 3004; Peg Gillen 6931 vs.
Francis Bonisteel 7926; Mrs. Skinner

Afternoon
2:00 - Michigan Theatre, "Opera-
tor 13" with Marion Davies.
2:00 - Majestic Theatre, "Many
Happy Returns" with Gracie Allen
and George Burns.
2:00 -- Wuerth Theatre, "Wonder
Bar" with Al Jolsen.
4:00 -Same features at the three
theatres.
Evening
7:00 - Same features at the three
theatres.
Canoeing on the Huron every af-
ternoon and evening.
Dancing at the Blue Lantern Ball-
room, Island Lake.

Chicago Plans New Home
For Burned Stock Edifice
CHICAGO, July 7. - UP) -- Out of
the ashes of Chicago's great stock-
yards fire will rise a new and finer
home of the International Live Stock
exposition, says its secretary manager.
B. H: Heide:
He adds that the new building to
replace the amphitheatre used 34
years for the show will be ready for
this year's exposition in December.
There will not be a stick of wood
in the entire. structure. The exterior
will be of brick and Indiana lime-
stone and the concrete roof will be
supported by steel trusses. Metal
seats will provide facilities for 12,000
spectators.

CLAS SIFTED DIRECTORY

a

* * *

vs. Nadine Cragg 4018; Jane Cohn
2-3279 vs. Jeanne Keppel 2-1586.
Junior Singles-Preliminary Round
Bob Lavey 2-3707 vs. Morris Fried-
man 3317; C. Mahlke 5094 vs. Bob
Keppel 2-1586.
Junior Singles - First Round
Geo. Frisinger 8360 vs. winner La-
vey-Friedman match; R. Shroth 88021
vs. I. Conlin 4902; Al. Lee 6423 vs.
John Ladd 3038; Ben Rosenbaum
6035 vs. Chas. Dolph 6251; M. Fishow
3970 vs. Dick Allan 2-2040; Jack
Montgomery 2-2618 vs. Carl Raab.
Roosevelt Says
Puerto Ricans
Get New Deal
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico, July 7. -
(P) -President Roosevelt in a talk to
Puerto Ricans today announced his
agreement in principal on a program
of rehabilitation for the island and
asked co-operation in carrying out
plans similar to those of the Adminis-
tration in the United States.
Talking into the microphone in
the old Spanish palace occupied by
Gov. Blanton Winship, the President
broadcast his promise and appeal be-
fore sailing for St. Thomas, Virgin
Islands.
"We must look ahead," said the
President. "That is why we have come
to an agreement in principle on a
program of rehabilitation, that it will
take a great many years to accomp-
lish.
"I am confident you will all do;
your part to make the plan a suc-
cess."
The plan was not announced in
detail, but it was assumed to be that
on which Undersecretary of Agricul-
ture Rexford G. Tugwell and island
"brain trusters" have been at work
for some time.
"Never as long as I live will I
forget the warmth of your recep-
tion," the President said in his short
address.

Tag Day Tuesday
Will Help Kids At
Fresh Air Camp
(Continued from Page 1)
be at home in the water. Little Jimmy
Petrolis, wearing a paralysis brace on
one leg and navigating only by
crutches, has worked himself up in
the two weeks he has been at camp,
to the honor of wearing a white cap,
which denotes the best swimmers in
the lot. He gamely smiles and says
"Yeah, I have the most fun doin'
that."
The kids' health is not forgotten
at any moment. Strict swimming and
boating regulations prevail, and if
there are any accidents (and there
always are), Robert "Doc" Ostrander
is at hand at all times.
Meals are, surprisingly enough, not
what the boys watch the clock for.
But their diet is carefullycplanned,
with plenty of fresh milk and fresh
vegetables emphasized. A rare treat
for all of them is homemade bread,
baked in the camp's new outdoor
oven - fourteen loaves for a meal. A
typical supper for the boys consisted
of vegetable soup, milk, raisin bread,
and cocoanut-custard pudding. Din-
ner is served at noon every day.
Each night two lodges (there are
nine of them) take their canoes and
luggage and travel a chain of six
small lakes on an overnight trip with
two councilmen. At the camp the
evening program is conducted around
a big bonfire -songs, stories and ed-
ucational talks, comprising the bill.
The boys themselves put on good mu-
sical and dramatic acts. They learn
songs very easily, and a lustier crowd
of glee clubbers is seldom found.
But it costs money to keep the
camp pot boiling for these kids - one
dollar a day per boy, to be exact.
And contributions dropped off this
year from former years. The camp
committee needs money badly, and
is sponsoring a Tag Day drive next
Tuesday. It is worthy of your sup-
port. Are you worthy of your citizen-
ship?

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISINC
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance-11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
Minimum three lines per insertion.
days from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month..... ..........8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months..8c
2 lines daily, college year ...7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year . . 7c
100 lines used as desired .... 9c
300 lines used as desired ... .8c
1,000 lines used as desired . .. .7c
2.000 lines used as desired . .. 6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch
of 712 point Ionic type, upper and lower
case. Add 6c per line toabove rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10c per line to above rates
for bold face capital letters.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten
more insertions.

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
NOTICE
TYPING
Eight Cents A Page
PHONE 2-1214 and
Leave Your Number, or
Come to Student Publications Bldg.
WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 2x
FOR SALE
SCOTTIE PUPS. Pedigreed, Reg.
A.K.C. Sturdy, loyal, companion-
able. Quality dogs, reasonably
priced. 1313 S. State. 25
Read The Classifieds

f

Our entire $12,000.00 Stock is offered at DRASTIC REDUCTIONS ...
to be made at the close of this Sale,... Stocks must be reduced at once.

Store-wide improvements
All Florsheim Shoes incl

I

-.-r.-..'tl

Dance Sunday Evening
at
CI-UBB'S
Ann Arbor's Largest and COOLEST Restaurant - Est. 1899
Music from 6 till 11
Marvin Druckenbrod and his Detroit Yacht Club Orchestra
No Minimum or Cover Charge at any time
Sunday Dinner Served Sandwich & Fountain Service
12:00 -- 7:30 12:00 -- 1 1:00

WOMEN'S SHOES
Whites - Blacks - Blues - Greys

MEN'S SHOES
Whites - Blacks - Browns - Combinations

300 Pairs, Women's
SPORT OXFORDS, Cut to
$4.88 $3.88"$
and $288
187 Pairs, WOMEN'S
REGULAR $6., $7., SHOES
Cut to
488
148 Pairs
STYLES UP TO $5.00
Broken Lots, cut to
$2.88

96 Pairs,
LADIES' FLORSHEIMS
$8,50 to $10. Grades, cut to
85 $6.85
327 Pairs, Women's
REGULAR $5. & $6. STYLES
Cut to
Seven Styles
WHITE SANDALS
Cool and Dressy
$1.48 $1.88=

78 PAIRS, MEN'S
FLORSHEIMS, broken lots
To be sold out
218 PAIRS
$6. & $7. NEW STYLES
Cut to
$4.88
86 PAIRS, MEN'S
OXFORDS, Broken Lots,
To Close
$2.88

336 PAIRS
MEN'S $8.75 and $10.00
FLORSHEIMS, cut to
L-$7.85
89 PAIRS
MEN'S PACKARD SHOES
$7. to $8 Values, Cut to
$5-88
ALL $5.00 SHOES
SOME $6 VALUES, cut to
This is a real buy
$3.88

p.

"U

I

SUMMER SCHOOL

TEXTBOOKS

Buy Two and Three Pairs at These Low Prices. . .Many Styles Just Right for Fall!

NEW AND USED - AT

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

CAMPUS

BOOTERY

304 SOUTH STATE
ANN ARBOR

316 STATE STREET

I

j

eat

sunday

dinner

at

fingerle's

I

.t

-X1ll1 1'--J _- - . 1L -- ~ .~f.-L- -- - l L- if U .Lt -- . 3 --U .3M _U- -

: 1

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