100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 29, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-06-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

THE ,MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, .

.. .. .. .. .. . .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session

and those who support it only as a temporary ex-
pedient combined against the proponents of the
"peaceful revolution." These three groups have
already gone into action, and the fall Congressional
elections will doubtless find them in very definite
outlines.

Screen Reflections
Four start means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star lust another picture;
no stars keep away from it.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until
3:30; 11:30 a. m. Saturday.

year. Friends who are visiting
campus are cordially invited.

l 4J

.,I

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and, the Big Tefl News Service.
s1o3diated -o ene ____1934
'-s £933 MlAIOtIA. V.GE) £934

Civic Reform. . .
ALONG-RECOGNIZED evil of our
American political system, whether
of local, county, state, or national government,
is the lack of an efficient merit system for select-
ing and keeping in office those persons who fill
governmental positions. Some offices are filled
through Civil Service selections, but that reform
has been but moderately far-reaching. Most of-
fices still establish their personnel through the
workings of the spoils system.
The spoils system works in two ways: first, it
allows the ballot box victor the privilege of
putting into office political friends and supporters
as a direct reward to them; second, it allows a
great degree of nepotism, or filling offices with
relatives and immediate members of the family.
In either case, there is rarely made any considera-
tion of merit, and the old public servant gives way
to the new with no thought of relative merit.
The spoils system has permeated the entire coun-
try, has run rampant for years. There is scarce
a public office holder in the country who does not
feel a Damoclean sword hanging above his head,
suspended from an all-too-thin political hair.
Truly, reform must begin at home. And that,
says the city of Cincinnati, is what has happened
in its manager-controlled city. Politics and office-
holding have been divorced, and the merit system
holds full sway.

**

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of'all news dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper and the local
news published herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor. Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Thrd Assistant Postmater-General.
Subscription du ng summer by carrierr $1.25; by mail,
$1.50. During reg lar school year by carrier, $3.75;- by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Epresentatives: College Publicatfons Representatives.
Ino., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston St'eet, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Phone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..:............E. JEROME PETTIT
ASSISTANT MANAGING -EDITOR ... .BRACKLEY SHAW
WOMEN'S EDITOR ..............ELEANOR JOHNSON
ASSOCIATE"EDITORS: Charles A. Baird, Clinton B. Con-
der, Paul J. Elliott, Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H.
Kleene, William R. Reed, Ro~bert S. Ruwitch.
REPORTERS:Barbara Bates C. H. Beukema, Frances
English, Harriet Hunt, Katherine Miller, Elsie Pierce,
Virginia Scott, 'Edgar H. Eckert, Bernard H1. Fried.
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Hours: 9-12, 1-5B Phone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER .........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
A5,T, B 'ISINESS MANAGER ......iW. GRAFTON SHARP
(7tlXC VLATION MANAGER........CLINTON B. CONGER

AT THE MICHIGAN
"THIRTY DAY PRINCESS"

Nancy Lane-Princess ..;..Sylvia Sidney
Porter Madison III .......... Cary Grant
King ................ Henry Stephenson
Here is an old plot, rewritten from a story
by Clarence Buddington Kelland. The adaptation
is not good although the picture itself is saved from
an hour of ennui mainly by the proficient acting of
Miss Sidney. This talented young actress is seen
in a double role, playing the parts of the prin-
cess and the princess' imitator, Nancy Lane. Re-
lated photography portraying the young women
together is not unusual.
The story, trite in the context, is that of the
Princess of Tyronia being brought to the United
States on a good-will tour for the purpose of mar-
keting Tyronian bonds. Upon her arrival, the prin-
cess is stricken with the mumps and Nancy Lane,
an actress, is hired to make the tour in place
of her prototype. Nancy, incidentally, falls in love
With Cary Grant, who plays as Porter Madison III,
young newspaper publisher bent on exposing the
foreign bonds as an empty shell. The climax is
easily anticipated but some amusing incidents
take place in the interim.
-R.S.R.
Casual Es Esays
By THE SUMMER OBSERVER

I
d
v
T
b
i
p
g
n
t
r
G
k
r
i
c
x
ti
c
4
t
1
A

Excursion No. 2: A Day in Detroit:
Including an, automobile tour of
downtown Detroit and Belle Isle, and
visits to the Detroit News, the WJR
Broadcasting Studio in the Fisher
Building, the Detroit Institute of
Arts, where will be seen the Riviera
W4Mirals, and the Detroit Public Li-
btary. Luncheon at the Fisher Build-
ing Cafeteria. The trip is especially
planned for students who desire ac-
quaintance with representative com-
mercial and cultural institutions of
the city.
Total expenses will be about $2. The
round trip motor bus tickets must be
obtained in Room 1213 Angell Hall,
before 5:00 p.m. Friday, June 29. The
number in the party will be limited.
Carl J. Coe
Psychology 110: This class will meet
in room 2003 N.S.
Zoology 201: Comparative Physiol-
ogy: A second laboratory section is
being arranged in Comparative Phy-
siology to accommodate those stu-
dents who could not get into the first'
section. Please see me at once.
A. E. Wootward
Mathematics 36: Professor Ayres'
class in Calculus 1 will meet in room
318 West Engineering Building here-
after..
Mathematics 3: College Algebra and
Analytical Geometry is being offered.
Students interested in this course call
Professor Copeland, dial 22765.
Choral Union Concert Series: The

schedule of dates of artists and or-
ganizations who will appear in the
1934-35 Choral Union Concert series
(55th Annual Series) has been cor-
rected to read as follows:
October 24, Rosa Ponselle in song
recital.1
November 1, Lawrence Tibbett, in
song recital.
November 19, Don Cossack Russian
Chorus. Serge Jaroff, conductor.
December 3, Josef Szigeti in violin
recital.
December 11, Boston Symphony
Orchestra. Serge Koussevitzky, con-
ductor.
January - Open date.
January 25, Lotte Lehmann, in song
recital.
February 12, Jose Iturbi in piano re-
cital.
March 4, Artur Schnabel in piano
recital.
March 28, Cleveland Symphony Or-
chestra. Artur Rodzinski, conductor.
Charles A. Sink, President
Jewish Students: A reception will
be held at the Hillel Foundation, cor-
ner of E. University and Oakland,
Sunday night at 8 p.m. Entertain-
ment, refreshments, and dancing will
be provided. All students are invited
to come and get acquainted.
Chinese Students Club: There will
be a social meeting of the Chinese
Students Club at Lane Hall on Sat-
urday, June 30, at 8:00 p.m. This
meeting is for the purpose of wel-
coming new students who are here
for the Summer Session as well as
those who are here for the coming

Psychology 110, Vocational Psy-
chology: Special consultation period
today for help with problems, in Room
2003 N.S., from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.
University Bureau of Appointments
& Occupational Information: Regis-
tration for summer school students
for both teaching and general posi-
tions will be held at the office, 201
Mason Hall, as follows:
Monday to Friday, July 2 to 6 (with
the exception of Wednesday, when
the offices are closed).
Hours 10:00 to 12:00, and 2:00 to
4:00.
There is no registration fee at this
time. After Friday, July 6, a late
registration fee of 1.00 will be
charged.
Division of Hygiene and Public
Health will have supper on the Mich-
igan League Lawn July 1 at 5:45 p.m.
Tickets are 35 cents and may be ob-
taiked in Dr. Sundwall's office and
at the Michigan League.
Swimming-Women Students: The
intermediate swimming class sched-
uled to meet on Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 10 o'clock at the Un-
ion Pool will meet on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings at 7:30. The class
begins on Thursday, June 28.
Lessons in Contract Bridge for men
and women will begin Monday, July
2, at 8 p.m.. Six lessons for $1.50.
(Continued on Page 3)
SDANCaIN G'
WHITMORE
LAKE
PAVILIlON
15 0
Wed'. -- Fri.--Sat. ,
Reide Pierce
and His
Orchestra
15V
Bargain Nite
Every Wednesday
-Admission 25c o
125
bee r beer
7 v;;;;0 :;;;> <;;;> <;;;> <;;;> <

r
i
t
a

Germany Tour
Timey..e.
THE THREE Michigan members of
the American delegation which will
tour Germany this summer are to b congratulated
upon their good fortune and upon the timeliness of
the occasion of their visit, for recent developments
there indicate that Germany is rapidly approach-
ing a crisis whos consequences will be of para-
mount importance to the whol world.
the recent speech of Vice Chancellor von Papen,
hailed as markilg a breach in the ranks o.the Na-
tiohal Socialist party and presaging the breakdown
of the Hitler regime, contain several remarks which
seem to represent the crux of the whol sitation.
Hitler, who is apparently to be classified in that
categry of politicians whom von 1apen describes
as "recognizing the necessities of his period" and
making himself "the protagonist for what must in-
e61dably be doe and thus fulfill the command of
lii t ry" now faces probably the biggest test of his
career.,
Acording to von Papen the statesman must
recognize "that though' an epochal change em-
braces and alters all manifestations and conditions
of life, against this vast background political events
pass only in the foreground and only to them
can the concepts of politics be applied. Statesmen
and p'oliticians can reform the State but not life
itself"
Aside from the economic. and diplomatic prob-
lems of the moment which face the Nazi govern-
ment, it is a recognition of these facts and a cor-
relation of the elements of politics and reform
which will provide the test for Hitler and his
party, in the impending crisis, the immediate con-
sequences of which the members of the touring
delegation will Jb able to' observe for their own
part.
PartyRealignment ..
FOR MANY YEARS the platforms of
.the Democratic and Republican
parties have been practically identical, except
possibly for the matter of tariff. The voter cast
his ballot for the same basic principals regardless
of which party he supported. The thinling electo-
rate found no way via the ballot to epress its con-
vlctions should they differ from those of the lead-
ing parties, the minor parties being insignificant.
Though the leaders of both parties would hes-
itate to admit it, the two great parties, which for
many elections have organized the electorate, are
disintegrating. The breakup of the great machines
began in the last presidential election when the
support of the Republicans for the New Deal ticket
swept Roosevelt into office. The question of the
New Deal is now splitting party organization wide
open. Three new divisions of political thought
are replacing the now 'decaying organizations.
David Lawrence of the United States News and
Frank Kent of the Baltimore Sun have pointed
out this party realignment. The group that. is
likely, to find the greatest public support upholds
the New Deal as an expediency to meet an
emergency. It insists upon the abandoning of gov-
ernment control of industry as soon as recovery
is accomplished
Led by the Roosevelt Administration, the sec-
ond group regards the New Deal as the first great
step toward a peaceful revolution to a civilization
fashioned around a planned economy. This group]
must depend principally upon the prestige and the
popularity of the President. Arguments alone, no
matter how valid, will have little effect. The
people are apparently not yet ready to break with
tradition. Many advocates of the New Deal who
outwardly ridicule individualism secretly cling to

"No employe in our City Hall," says C. A.
Dykstra, city manager, "thinks or acts in terms
of service to a party. Neither does any one of
them pay assessment or fee to the support of a
party organization. He gets his job as a result
of his own ability to measure up to requirements."
Mr. Dykstra says that a typical statement of the
Cincinnati office-holder is much as follows: "It's a
great relief not to have to punch doorbells each
night after work to win votes for my party in
order to keep my job.".
Yes, it must be a great relief for the city
employee not to have to compete politically for job
security. Political competition is too often unfair
competition. The 'merit system, not political strat-
egy, is the only just means of office filling. It is
the competition in meeting job requirements,
rather than competition in gathering votes, that
makes for efficient, civic-minded public workers '
Let reform begin at home. Let more cities give
up the idea of rewarding election patrons with
political jobs. Let more cities strive to encourage
the career of public service, rather than politics.
Let the ball of civic reform start rolling.
-C.A.B.
T"he Theatrel
RATIA
SIDELIGHT S ON THE
REPERTORY PLAYERS
HERE'S SOMETHING that won't happen again
in Michigan dramatic circles for a long time. These
last two days have seen the Repertory Players all
tangled up in four different productions. Two of
them are the ones showing this week. Francis
Compton is rehearsing "Grumpy" for presentation
next week, and try-outs are being held for "Both'
Your Houses," the fourth play of the season. "One
Sunday Afternoon" had its final showing last
night

* * *

*

YOU'RE GOING to see a lot of new faces in
"Grumpy." Francis Compton, who has the lead,
is of course known in Ann Arbor for his work
in the Spring Dramatic Seasons, but in going over
the temporary cast yesterday we noticed several
names which were unfamiliar to us.
* * * *
CARL NELSON, who appears tonight in "A Hun-
dred Years Old" as Alonzo, the drunken radical,
does one of the best "bit" parts in the show. He
and Sally Pierce, who also gets "tipsy" in the last
act, received a large hand from one of the first
night audiences.
VIRGINIA FRINK, Charles Harrell, Carl Nel-
son, Frances Manchester, Harlan Bloomer, Fred
Crandall, James Doll and Louise Pliss have been'
busy this week. They've appeared in both shows.
Musical Events
Palmer Christian, Organist, Arthur Hackett,
tenor, Wassily Besekirsky, violinist, Hanns Pick,
violoncellist and Joseph Brinkman, pianist, will
unite their resources in providing an interesting
program of musical numbers at the first Summer
School concert by the University School of Music,
Tuesday evening, July 3, at 8:15 o'clock in Hill
Auditorium. The general public with the exception
of small children is invited but is respectfully re-
quested to be seated on time.
The program will be as follows:
Concerto in D .................Vivaldi-Bach
Introduction-Fugue
Largo
Allegro
Palmer Christian
Sonata Op 30 No 3...............Beethoven
Allegro assai
Tempo di Minuetto
Allegro vivace
Wassily Besekirsky and Joseph Brinkman
Trochne Blumen, Fruhlingsglaube,
Du Bist die Ruh ...............Schubert
Fruhlingsnacht, Im Wunderschonen Monat
Mai, Aus Meinen Thranen Spriessen,,

THE POOR STUDENT
The poor student is such a commonplace, woe-
is-me, almost natural sight to the Michigan cam-
pus, that almost nothing is new or appealing about
his troubles.' Now, however, he has gone, at least
for the summer. His more opulent cousins, the
teachers, are here. And we may forget.
Ann Arbor may forget the boy who sold so much
blood at the hospital for $25 a quart that
he went home anaemic. "What the hell, a little
blood," he so often said, "What the hell!" He was
right.
Forget, too, the guy who wore rubber soles inside
his shoes. You see, waiting tables for meals, run-
ning around an office for FERA, and selling beer
at night requires a lot of free sole. The boy didn't
have it, so he just put a little extra on the inside
of his shoe, until he poisoned himself. But that is
neither here nor there. He was foolish.
Forget, too, themoochers. Depression has made
a great many of th'em'. Times are solid and a fel-
low ought to forgive a fellow - his trespasses.
Alice you know, she took my kale when I had
it; so why shouldn't I let her take me out? Why?
And Helen. She picked my stuff in many a blue
book. Why shouldn't I smoke her cigarettes? She's
glad to have me around. Most women are.
Forget the poor women who have hysterics in
the professor's office because, alack adhysthey
have no job, and don't know what they are going
to do. "How do I look?" said one before going in.
"Swell, give him the works, and don't forget to
sigh and pinch your nose so you will cry!"
In she went and out she came twenty minutes
later. "It worked," she said. "He's going to raise
my grade!"
Forgetting is such sweet ease. Students have
been poor as long as there have been students.
There is no evidence of poor students dying out
or off. But today, now, the rich student is here,
at least the richer student, albeit fewer in number.
And these, too, had their hysterics in front of the
Board of Education before their back salaries were
paid so that they might come to Michigan jingling
their coins and folding their bills into neat, com-
pact wads.
"I came to Michigan," one said, "to steep my-
self in the miseries, I mean mysteries of 'how to
live well on nothing a year'." Shades of Thackeray.
THE LANDLADIES,
GOD BLESS 'EM
If the landladies of Ann Arbor would talk, what
a story there could be unfolded. But sh-shsh! Ann
Arbor must not be shocked, even with the undec-
orated truth.
Ann Arborites must not know that Mrs. Peek-
aboo has singular ways. Every night near seven-
thirty during the winter sessions, Mrs. Peek-aboo
goes flashlight in hand to see if her girls are in
or out. She wears rubber heels. And suddenly she
will stand by the front room, in the upper hall,
and click! The light is on. Once she found the cat
chewing her husband's topee. Other times she
finds her girls asleep, for her girls are always the
"best girls."
Ann Arborites must never know of Mrs. Quick.
She helps her girls keep rules, on the 'dot! Just
one minute before ten thirty in the wintertime,
Mrs. Quick coughs one long, loud cough. Then sud-
denly the porch light looms. The girls know it is
time to come in. The men have learned too.
However, Ann Arborites do know of those care-
ful landladies who cross-question prospective house
"guests." Some there be who actually ask (honest):
"Do you have religion? Do you believe in a Supreme
Being? How often do you bathe? May I rely on
your not whistling after hours? Are you a nice girl?
Will you promise not to leave your gum under my
tables?"
Ann Arborites may not have heard the reaction
to such treatment. For at least one co-ed used
the same medicine. "I wish to ascertain before
I engage a room here whether I may wash my
stockings on Sunday? Whether or not you sing
hymns late Saturday nights? If I may lock the
bathroom door? And last, but certainly not of
lesser importance, if I may put my feet on your
desk when I study?"

CO

7 ~ --

*..........MAJ ESTIC .....-.... .
JACK OAKIE SPENCER TRACY
'Looking For Trouble"
A PANIC OF FUN AND RIOT OF LAUGHTER
Tomorrow - "The Merry Frinks"

.

irmw wim

Matinees 15c . . . . . . W UERTH.
DOUBLE FEATURE PRO
Rob't Montgomery R
in
"MYSTERY OF
MR. X"

. . . . .Nights 25c
DGRAM
Richard Arlen
"GOLDEN
H ARtVST"

i
iJ

-

imiam

f

i'i i

What PREKETES

11

I

-w 7

t- --- -

SUGAR

BOWL

ATTEND MIHGNATTEND'4
L MATINEES, * A'"." .COOL MATINEES
SYLVIA SIDNEYin
"30 DA Y PRINCES
with CA RY GRANT
A Delightful Picture For Everyone!

LS. .

"'A PLACE OF INDIVIDUALITY AND DISTINCTION"
COMPLETE FOUNTAIN
TOASTED SANDWICHES

1'

REGULAR MEALS
JUICY STEAKS

LUNCHES
FROG LEGS

FISH

SALADS

DRAUGHT BEER

BOTTLED BEER (ALL KINDS)
HOME MADE CANDY

Beer and Wine to take
off the premises sold
until 2:00 A.M.
3 Bottles for a Quarter

d

"Anything served
is of the Choicest
Brand"

I

These can be obtained at the SUGAR BOWL Oat all hours.
We offer Excellent Service in a Cool, Restful Atmosphere.

l'

It'El

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan