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August 17, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-08-17

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TI

MICHIGAN DAILY

Home In Crucial Tiger-Yankee Battle

-i

Prof. Carr To

Seek Post On
School Board

Where To Go
By THOS. HERMAN KLEENE
Afternoon
2:00 - Michigan Theatre, "She
Learned About Sailors" with Alice
Faye and Lew Ayres.
2:00 - Majestic Theatre, "As The
Earth Turns" with Jean Muir.
2:00 - Wuerth Theatre, two fea-
tures, "Little Giant" with Edward
G. Robinson and "Looking For Trou-
ble" with Jack Oakie.

7:00-
theatres.
Canoein
ternoon a

I room,
Dan
Pavilib

Three Positions Vacant;
Sunderland, Fisher Not
Running For Re-election
A member of the University faculty,i
Prof. Lowell J. Carr of the sociology
department, is among the candidates
for the three vacancies on the Ann
Arbor School Board for whom peti-
tions are now being circulated, ac-
cording to an announcement made
yesterday by Lee Thurston, assistant
superintendent of schools.
George J. Lutz, Jr., is. the only in-
cumbent whose term expires who isI
running for re-election, the an-j
nouncement indicated, the other two,
Prof. Edson R. Sunderland of the
Law School faculty, and Dr. Charles
A. Fisher, assistant director of the
University extension division, having
already announced their intention not
to seek re-election
In addition to Professor Carr, pe-
titions are also being circulated for
Mr. Lutz and V. E. Van Ameringen,
prominent local attorney.

season's c
sented an
1933.

Of

CLASSI-IED DIR

-Associated Press Photo
The Bambino scooped up the dust in this close pl ay at the home plate in the third inning as the Amer-
ican league-leading Detroit Tigers and the second-p lace Yankees opened their crucial series with a double-
header at Yankee stadium, the Tigers winning both ga mes. The picture shows Ruth- scoring on a single by
Dickey.

Intramural Department Closes'
Successful Summer Program

Michigan Graduate
Named Idaho Dean

By R. W. WEBSTER
(In Charge of Summer Intramurals)

Hunn was third with 520 points, Begle
was fourth with 480 points.

is

The Intramural Department closed
a successful season with many en-
d tries in practically all sports offered.
There was a great amount of interest
and enthusiasm shown in all tour-
a nament play.

1 ne ta ha The tournaments with the largest
to have number of entries and greatest
is in the amount of interest were baseball, ten-
ong com- nis, golf and swimming. Other tour-
Duke be- naments conducted were handball,
squash, horseshoes, archery, badmin-'
ears, will ton, codeball and Sigma Delta Psi
er having tests.
ays Mar- The baseball league, which had 75
)me, and different men playing in it, was by far
one of the most outstanding events of
the latest the summer's program. The teams
that made up the leagu'e were thej
DULE Principals captained by Mr. Hicks, the'
home. Educational Research captained by
Mr.. Rankin, the ,Superintendents
iome. captained by Mr. Vredevoogd, and
the Teachers captained by Mr. Tem-
pleton. The Principals and Educa-
e. tional Research teams tied for team
championship, which necessitated' a
home. league play-off. The Principals fin-
ally won after a hard-fought game to
coaching keep their record free from defeats.
s play at The next largest tournament was
Schmidt, the singles tennis. This was marked
cession to' by keen competition and rivalry
stated he among all of the contestants. Cole-
es, "they man, runner-up in 1932, was defeated
ame way in the quarter-finals by Adelman, who
ble record in turn was defeated by Schneider.
t will find Schneider played Edmonds in the
Western finals, winning 7-5, 6-3, to gain the
all-campus championship.
midt had I Of the 16 pairs of tennis doubles
four tied teams the Agnew-Srigley combina-
tion defeated Coleman-Haines, Aro-
ian-Metcalf and Kelly-Rogers to win
he season the all-campus doubles champion-
r Illinois, ship.
lWestern Play in the all-campus golf tour-
e meeting nament was equally as keen and in-
teresting as the tennis singles. The
n will be outstanding players were Sowinski,
the 1933 Ray, Norman and Morairty. Ray, from
.aduation, Memphis, Tenn., defeated Sowinski
Rosequist, of Niagara Falls, N. Y., 4-2, in the
as a man semi-finals and Norman of Valley
ramer. City, N. D 4-2,in the finals to win
ethe sea- the 'championship.
4 against The innovation of the Education
k Hanley Club Golf Tournament proved very
and will popular this year. These matches
e winding were run more or less informally for
Wolver- the purpose of fellowship between the
club members, students, and faculty.
vith Mar- The members of the club were divided
to Stan- arbitrarily into two teams, one under
hio State, the leadership of Professor Washke
orthwest- and the other under Prof. Thomas
uigan. Diamond. The matches were played
e reached weekly with a great deal of enthusi-
Wolverine asm throughout the middle part of
mply that the summer session by about 20 dif-
after all ferent men. Prof. Washke's team
;ood faith won the series and Mr. Wilber Wor-
east three ley was medalist of the Whole-tour
s for his nament.
The summer swimming program in-
ie crest of itiated several summers ago, and
ng is quite which has .proved so popular for the
ate rivals last two seasons, was even more inter-
is off the petition has been more or less one-
such plea- esting this year. Heretofore, the com-
sided, but this year it was practically
impossible to predict the outcome un-
Go til the last event was over. Dick Beal
was first by the virtue of two first
Ilection places, five second places, and one
T) -Abra- third, for a total of 820 points. Y. C.
portrait of Yin was second with 660 ponits, Dave
Frederick

In the all-campus handball, Bates
defeated Dalzell, Kurty and Kazmar
to win the championship. Kazmar
defeated Greenstein in the semi-
final match to win the right to play
Bates in the finals.
In the horseshoe tournament We-
hausen defeated Kirschbam in the
semi-final match and won over Borin
in the finals.
Roy defeated Wehausen in the fin-
als to win the all-campus squash
championship.
Approximately 300 students par-
ticipated in the organized activities.
Many more enjoyed informal play as
well as many others received instruc-
tion in most all sports which brought
the total to several hundred more-
approximately 600 or 701 men being
contacted through all the- depart-
ments of the Intramural Depart-
ment during the entire Summer Ses-
sion.

Dr. Richard E. McArdle, a graduate
of the University in the class of 1923,
has been appointed dean of the
School of Forestry at the University
of Idaho, according to word received
by the local forestry school. McArdle.
succeeds Dr. Francis G. Miller, who
died last spring.
The new dean graduated with the
class of 1923, obtained his master's
degree in forestry in 1924, and after
several years with the U. S. Forest
Service, returned to the University
for graduate work and was granted
his doctor's degree in 1930.
Since that time he has been em-
ployed by the, Forest Service at the
Pacific Northwest Experiment Sta-
tion in Portland, where he has been
successively a specialist in forest
mensuration, in charge of forest fire
research, and chief of the section of
silviculture. He assumes his new du-
ties at the University of Idaho on
Sept. 1.
Dr. McArdle married Dorothy Cop-
page (M.S. '28) in 1927. They have
two cbildren.

I

Registration of voters who have
not registered or voted during the last
six years can be made at the business
office of the .board of education any
time before 6 p.m., Sept. 6, Thurs-
ton's announcement stated. To vote,
a citizen must be the owner of as-
sessed property for taxes in the school
district or else the parent or legal
guardian of a child between the ages
of 5 to 19.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISINC
i Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box Numbers , may be secured at no
ektra charge.
Cash in Advance-lic per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
Minimum three lines per insertion.
days from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2. lines daily, one
month.....................fc
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months. ..8
2 lines daily, college year ...7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year ..7Vc
100 lines used as desired ....9c
'300lines used as desired .. 8c
1,000 lines used as desired ....7c
2,000 lines used as desired ...6co
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch
of 71 point Ionic type, upper and lower
case. Add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10c per line to above rates
for bold face capital letters.
Telephone Rate-i5c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten
more insertions.I
WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 2x

WANTED:
Ind. Roo
penses. C
TRANSPOF
five doll
through
6118.
TWO WAIN

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Soxd
Careful work at low pri

or vic
Roth.

'BUSINESS
to share
Separate

TWO quiet room
near campus.
water. Phone 9

ind

P
cor
det
the
Bri

MARINES LEAVE HAITI
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti, Aug. 16.
(P)- The United States marine
ps evacuated Haiti today, the last
achment sailing at 9 a.m. aboard
transport Argonne and the U.S.S.
.dge.

fort or

C ASH

P

Ii

J~n 6ectric
WAFLEIRON
adds zest to summer supper's
at a cost Of
2 1/2c AN HOUR
WAFFLES may be served in dozens of deli-
CiOuS ways - and they make an ideal dessert
for summer suppers, for parties and im-
promptu luncheons. Needless to say, they
are at their best when prepared in an electric
waffle iron. - This handy appliance turns'
them out light and crisp and golden - a
tempting treat when served with sauces,
crushed fruit and ice cream, or any one of
countless other ways. An electric waffle
iron costs only 2 %/2c an hour to operate.
Have you ever considered how economi-
cally your other household electric appli-
ances perform their many duties? An elec-
tric iron, for example, costs only four cents
an hour to operate. .A vacuum cleaner
whisks away dust and dirt smoothly and
efficiently at a cost of one cent an hour.
An electric clock keeps time as faithfully
as the finest watch-never needing winding
or attention for a fifth of a cent a day.
An electric washer operates for two cents
an hour.
DETROIT EDTSON

'9

WAH R'S

BOC

for your USED BO

316 STATE STREET

,;

E

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSO I
LECTU

EIGHT

GREAT PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS
NO INCREASE IN PRICES

*RUTH BRYAN OWEN
"This Business of Diplomacy"
* STUART CHASE
"The Economy of Plenty"
* LYMAN BE EC H E R STOW E
"Saints, Sinners and Beechers"
* CHESTER SCOTT HOWLAND
"Hunting Whales in the Seven Seas"
(Illustrated with Motion Pictures)
* LOWELL THOMAS
"Around the World and On the Air"
* MAURICE HINDUS
"Stalin, Hitler, Roosevelt - Who Will Win?"
* BURTON HOLMES
"Around the World with Burton Holmes"
(Illustrated with Color Motion Pictures)
* MARK SULLIVAN
"Behind the Scenes in Washington"

:ction and his
in in Illinois.
ng, known as
hangs in the
.t the world's
d at the con-
n to the Uni-
become part
ing collection

Bluebooks
For EXAMS
Bring in your used Textbooks,,
to be sold at your own price.
Nominal fee for handling.
-Book Exchange
Student Supply Store.
.1111 S9 University Ave.

Associated Press Photo

I

I

Low Season Ticket Prices:
$3.00 $2.75 12,50
Eight Numbers
Single Admissions 75c & 50c

SPR ik.J(qwATrFR

i

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