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August 11, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1934-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

POU -- ' - TH1E MICHIGAN DAILY SATURA

kY

Second Issue Of
Art Magazine To
Come Out Today
Publication Is Edited By
Dr. Aga-Oglu, Lecturer
On Oriental Art Here
Held AsAuthority
Leading Article Discusses
Islamic Contribution To
Chinese Civilization

(Continued from Page 1)
lection of Mongolian paintings ob-
tained in Peiping in 1930.
A. K. Coomaraswamy, writing on
"Khwaja Khadir and the Fountain
of Life, in the Tradition of Persiai
and Mughal Art," tells several leg-
ends built up around the character
of Khwaja Khadir, master of the
flowing river of life in the Land of
Darkness, and shows how the legends
have been used as a subject by orien-
tal painters.
In the first part of an article to be
continued in subsequent issues of
"Ars Islamica" Dr. Aga-Oglu has
written "Preliminary Notes on Some
Persian Illustrated Mss. in the Top-
kapu Sarayi Muezesi." Accompany-
ing the article are miniatures of the
manuscripts published for the first
time, which, according to the author,
deserve special, attention because of
their particular importance for the
stylistic study of book painting in
Persian.
"Die Waffenschaetze im Topkapu
Sarayi Muezesi zu Istanbul - Ein
Vorglaeufiger Bpricht," the title of an
article by Hans Stoecklein discussing
the collection of weapons, shields,'
mailed shorts and other war parapha-
nalia in the museum in Istanbul.
Prof. William H. Worrell of the
Oriental Languages department has
contributed a study "On Certain Ara-
bic Terms for 'Rug.'" Pointing out
how many English words have
changed from their original mean-
ings, Professor Worrell traces the
etymology of the Arabic words for
several types of rugs and shows how
they gained their present meanings.
As a result of considerable research
on the subject Burton Y. Berry dis-
cusses "Turkish Door Furnishings."
Four sources were consulted for the
material used in the article; doors of
buildings used as historical monu-
ments, contemporary ecclesiastical
buildings, domestic buildings, and old
buildings outside of the Istanbul re-
gion.

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Scene As President Honors Michigan Graduate, Brother

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Freedom Given
ToNumbers By
Adolf Hitler
New President Of Germany-
Causes Surprise With His
First Official Act
BERLIN. Aug. 10. - (1P) -In his
first official act as both president and
chancellor, Adolf Hitler Thursday
granted unexpected freedom to thou-
sands of political prisoners incarcer-
ated in German jails and concentra-
tion camps.
Liberation of the political prisoners
was proclaimed in an official govern-
ment announcement of a new "gen-
eral amnesty law" and "amnesty for-
certain groups of political prisoners."
. The liberation order will apply, gen-
erally, only to those convicted of
minor political offenses. In no cases
will sentences for high treason, mili-
tary espionage and attempts against
life be revoked.
Aug. 2 Date Of Division
This indulgent cancellation of sen-
tences imposed by courts was re-
garded as Hitler's first step toward
obtaining a favorable public attitude
toward the plebiscite Aug. 19, in which
the German people will be asked to
approve his assumption of the au-
thority of Reichspresident.
The act was offered as a commemo-
ration of the union of the presidency
and the chancellorship. The amnesty
will apply, moreover, only to fines and
prison sentences imposed prior to Aug.
2, the date of President Paul von
Hindenburg's death.
It was announced that the general
amnesty will apply without regard
to the offense to persons fined up
to 1,000 marks or imprisoned for a
period up to six months, provided the
prisoner has no previous criminal
record.
Offenses Classified
Even persons previously convicted
will be liberated if sentences do not
exceed three months, or if fines were
less than 500 marks.
The political offenses for which
amnesty is to be extended were classi-
fied as follows:
First, these guilty of making in-
sulting remarks about Hitler;
Second, those who by spoken or
written word have attacked "the wel-
fare of the Reich, or the esteem in
which it is held," provided these of-
fenders are not known as enemies of
the state;
Third, those whose offenses grew
out of excitement in "championing
National Socialist thought."
tional Socialist thought."
Fourth, those convicted of uttering
insults or inflicting bodily attacks inC
political disputes.

-Associated Press Photo
In heat that caused scores of collapses among the vast assemblage, thousands packed Soldiers' field at
Rochester, Minn., to hear President Roosevelt speak in connection with exercises honoring Drs. William and
Charles Mayo, noted surgeons. At top the President is shown beside the plaque presented by the American
Legion to'ythe Mayo brothers.. With him are his son John, the Mayo brothers and two of their grandchildren.
Below is a general view of the crowd which heard the President. Dr. William Mayo graduated from the
University of Michigan Medical School in 1883. Honorary degrees were conferred upon him by the University
in 1900 and in 1908.

Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance-11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10e per reading line for three or
Minimum three lines per insertion.
days from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month.............C
4 lines E.U.D., 2 months.8c
2 lines daily, college year :..7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year . .7r,
100 lines used as desired ....9c
300 lines used as desired . . .8c
1,000 lines used as desired . ..7c
2,000 lines used as desired . .. 6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
of 71 point Ionic type, upper and lower
case. Acid 6e per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10c per line to above rates
for bold face capital letters.
Telephone Rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten
more insertions.
WANTED
TRANSPORTATION for one to At-
lanta, Ga. at end of school. Willing
to share expenses. Phone 4464.
LOS ANGELES and return $25. Leav-
ing August 19, returning September
15. Box 11M, Michigan Daily. 72
WANTED: Girl student wants ride to
Fort Wayne after Summer School.
Share expenses. Call 5938. 80
WANTED: A ride to Bessemer, Mich.
or vicinity. Will share expenses.
Call Ann L., 3718. 77

WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 dol
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 2x

I-" .

Wandering American Athletes Blind Boy Makes
Like German Sport Situation Friends On Ab
ULem _________ kWith Set HenyBu
DUSSELDORF, Germany, Aug. 9.. linguistic knowledge in reply to a

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- (')- Six peregrinating American I question concerning their liking for

Peter Ruthven, son of President
Alexander G. Ruthven, has contrib-
uted an article on "Two Metal Works
of the Mamluk Period." He discussesS
two pieces of engraved metal work
which have never been the subject of
publication in the collections of Cinili
Koshk Muezesi in Istanbul.
The final essay in the publication is
a criticism by Ernst Diez of an ar-
ticle by Mlle. Marguerite van Ber-
chem on the mosaics of the Dome of
the Rock in Jerusalem. .
The publication as a whole is pro-
fusely illustrated with photographs of
the various types of art considered.

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etes have found Germany much
heir liking, especially the calibre'
German competition. The matter
wine, though, is something else
n.
Sehr gut! Sehr gut!" said John Ly-
n, the big discus and weight man
he group, proudly displaying his

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Expect Battle
Over Fixing Of
NRA Coal Rate,
GRAND RAPIDS, Aug. 10.- (F) -
A bitter battle over the price fixing
in the coal industry loomed today
when it was reported that several
Grand Rapids coal dealers defied NRA
code authorities in refusing to in-
crease prices as ordered in this dis-
trict by Howard E. Blood, Detroit di-
visional NRA staff.
Several of the merchants continued
to quote prices as of July 31, whereas
an increase from $8.50 to $9.58 a ton
for car run. Pocahontas was approved
by Blood, they said.
A majority of dealers, however, are
abiding by the new price schedule.'
but were communicating with Wash-
ington authorities in an effort to
settle the disagreement. The dissent-
ing merchants contended that reliable
sources in Washington had informed
them Blood was relieved of price-fix-
ing authority.

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Roosevelt Back
At White House
After Travels
Tanned And Invigorated,
President Is Ready To
Take UpTasks
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10.,-() -
President Roosevelt tanned and in-
vigorated from his 13,000 miles of
business-pleasure travels, returned to
the White House today to grapple
with a host of New Deal problems.
The President arrived shortly before
noon after a fast trip from Chicago.
Several thousand persons were at
Union Station to greet him after
an absence of 41 days on his trip
to outlying possessions and his jour-
ney across the United States from
the west coast.
Secretaries Hull and Morgenthau
were among the officials to greet the
President on his arrival.
Embraced' within the scope of the
urgent questions confronting the ex-
ecutive's personal attention are the
widespread and devastating drouth,
labor troubles, possible new courses
for the alphabetical headliners -NRA
and AAA -Latin American issues,
preliminaries incident to the 1935 na-
val arms conferences and many
others, including:
Reciprocal tariff negotiations, un-
employment relief plans for the next
year, government financing, mone-
tary problems, and last but not least,
political'matters.

Germany and Germans.,
"Sportsmen in this country are
sehr - sehr - what do you say? - ja,
kameradschaftlich, very friendly, and
very polite. Especially is there in Ger-
many a very pronounced interest in
sports, a fine companionable spirit,
and great support for athletes."
"What do you think of German beer
and wine?" he was asked. "Even an
athlete has his glass now and then?"
Do As Rhine Folks Do
"Oh, perhaps I'll have some wine
in one of the Rhine villages," he re-
plied, "but we don't care particularly
for it. However, when one is on the
Rhine, one must do as the Rhine folks
do."
Lyman and his colleagues - Foy
Drayer, George Spitz, Ivan Fuqua and
Gene Venzke - plunged into a hard,
series of games immediately on their
arrival in Germany.
One reason is their strenuous pro-
gram. In their first week they en-
gaged in four meets against leading
'athletes not only from Germany but
also Hungary and Poland.
German Discus-Heaver Tough
"We had not had time enough to
get into condition when we started," i
Lyman said, "and we needed time toI
become acclimated."
Lyman found his hardest competi-
tion at the hands of Hans Heinrich
Sievert, new German decathlon lum-
inary and Olympic hope, who beat the
American in the discus at Frankfort
but lost to him at Dusseldorf. Seivert's
heave of 46.49 m. (152 feet 6/4 in.),
however, was the best throw.
Fuqua and Spitz have been in Ger-
many before, but this is the first time
for the others.
CONFER ON DEBT
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10. - (FP) -
A conference between American and
Soviet officials today on debts due
this Country apparently made little
progress, and one of the officials par-
ticipating said that the next few days
would reveal whether there was any
prospect of an agreement.4

MOHNTON, Pa., Aug. 10. - (R) -
Amateur radio operators in various
parts of the country have "talked" on
the air with station W3CKD-in this
little town near Reading, but few of
them know the station was built and
is operated by a youth blind since
birth.
James C. Mohn -"Sunshine Jim-
my" they call him - has been work-
ing on the station in his home since
1930. He's 22 years old and hopes
to spend the rest of his days in his
workshop, because he "gets so much
pleasure out of communicating with
boys, many of them shut-ins," and
because of the friends he makes.
In Touch With Others
Jimmy built his first short wave
receiver shortly after taking up the
study of radio.
"I was fascinated with the idea of
being able to listen to boys in different
parts of the country talking to each
other," he says. "I wrote to several,
reporting on the reception of their
signals, and they began keeping reg-
ular schedules with me. I received
my temporary license in 1932 and an
unlimited amateur radio phone op-
erator's license in 1933.
Forwards Parents' Notes
"Because of the struggle I have
nad in the past, I am better able to
appreciate what many people have
to face and so it has always been my
desire to try to spread a little sun-
shine on the air."
Mohn sends messages from parents
to boys in camps and schools. He
even aids business people, and his sta-
tion has become an institution in the
community. His fan mail is heavy.
Jimmy answers all his mail on a
typewriter. His mother and friends
read the letters to him, just as they
did his course of instructions on
radio.
EARTHQUAKE OCCURS
PANAMA, Aug. 10. -(P) - A slight
earthquake shook Panama, Cristobal
and Madden Dam today. Although
many buildings were cracked the ca-
nal locks were. undamaged.

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BOX SCORES

CLEVELAND
ABRI
Seeds, 'f.........5 1
Knickerbocker, ss . .4 0
Averill, m.........5 0
Holland, if........5 0
Trosky, lb.... ..4 2
Hale, 2b .........4 0
Burnett, 3b .......5 0
Berg,c.........4 1
Hildebrand, p.....3 1
Harder, p.........1 0

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Books-NEW-FICTION-Books

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FOR YOUR SUMMER

READING

~7e HallmarkjI
Wh~ich h6as a News agent.
Cit n te oi

Totals .........40 5
DETROIT
AB R

Carl Cramer .............STARS FELL ON ALABAMA...............$3.00
Alice Hobart ............RIVERS SUPREME......................2.50
Stark Young.... .....SO RED THE ROSE........ ............2.50.
Josephine Lawrence .....YEARS ARE SO LONG................... 2.50
Edward Shanks..........TOM FIDDLERS'S GROUND.....:..........2.50
A. P. Herbert ........... HOLY DEADLOCK .......................... 2.50
Irwin S. Cobb........... FAITH, HOPE, & CHARITY............... 2.00
Donn Byrne ............ AN ALLEY OF FLASHING SPEARS.......... 2.00
Beatrix Lehmann ........RUMOUR OF HEAVEN...................2.50
1- - 1Y.,....1 ..r 'ITTIL" ..0 IZ

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